Monthly Archives: August 2014

Worldclass Free Business Growth Bootcamp with Bill Walsh in London

Do you need to fine tune your big business idea?  Are you looking for a partner? Then this is an event not to be missed!

Bill Walsh free Business Growth Seminar in London hosted by Diane Shawe

Bill Walsh has agreed to come to the UK from the US and give a free Business Growth Session whilst I host a business success panel.To post your question to the panelists Click here 

Come to this free event and learn how to launch & build an even more successful business with one of the World’s most successful Business Coach. Normally to attend one of his sessions would cost over £1,000

When you attend you will have the opportunity to put your questions to our Business Panelist and network
with local business executives.

The educational focus is on Business Growth – Public Speaking and how to create your own VIP Masterminds. Plus everyone will receive some amazing gifts just for attending!

Here’s why you should attend:

Bill Walsh will discuss:

How to Monetise your Intellectual Property
How to Build a 12-Month Success Plan
How to Connect & Do deals with the Ultra-Successful
How to Become laser focused & ultra-productive
How to Monetise your Passion

For Complimentary Tickets visit CLICK HERE

Sponsored by Diane Shawe CEO of AVPT Ltd.

get mentoring with diane shawe business start up loans

 

Bill Walsh New book out now Oblivion Get your copy now

Do you have questions about Business Start up and Growth Bootcamp with Bill Walsh Millionaire Coach? Click here to register your question

If all the unemployed formed a country it would be the fifth largest in the world. Why does this matter?

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

Why the grip held by outdated educational institutions based on historical prestige needs to take a back seat and become student centric!

Article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

If we hadn’t had the most recent global economical crisis and the unrest in certain war torn regions had not occurred, there might have been 62 million more jobs in the world today, according to the International Labor Organisation as it is, there are over 200 million people looking for work across the globe.

To add to our worries: 75 million of these are young people, eager to take that first firm foothold in the ladder of success. We cannot allow them to become a “lost” generation.

The Great Recession has been particularly hard on older workers also, who have had difficulty finding new jobs after being unemployed for long spells. This is especially troubling because of their pressing needs for health care and retirement preparation.

It is also doubtful that the long-term unemployed are going to become more effective jobseekers simply by being forced to visit a Job centre daily if indeed they have a job centre in some parts of the world. But I am going to site that back in 1996, when the Jobseeker’s Allowance was introduced, the requirement to visit a Job centre every two weeks and provide detailed evidence of active job search did not raise overall job search effort among the unemployed.

If explicit job search requirements were not effective in a period of rapidly growing labour demand and falling unemployment, there is no good reason to expect them to be effective in the aftermath of a severe recession and one cannot certainly make a claim to recovery based on one geographical location sprinkled with opportunities driven by technology and property prices.

So clearly, jobs must be a preeminent priority in the years ahead. The major test of the new technological era is simple: can it provide decent livelihoods for all people?

Technology and rising inequality feeds into a broader concern: Technological advance creates a small cohort of big winners, leaving everybody else behind.

Certainly, those with the lowest skills are having the toughest time in today’s economy.

And yet, we also need to discuss what kind of growth this “right track” leads to. Will it be solid, sustainable, and balanced—or will it be fragile, erratic, and unbalanced?

To answer this question, we need to look at the patterns of economic activity in the years ahead, and especially the role of education, technology and innovation in driving us forward.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said: “No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.” Isaac Asimov

So I have chosen a big topic and what I want to address in my blog today, in the form of three questions:

1. First, what does this new technological era mean for the economy, especially for jobs?

2. Second, how does it relate to one of the scourges of our age—rising inequality?

3. Third, what about some solutions, including vocational education and what I refer to as the growing need to foster a new thinking around “Entreployability”

The Interlinkages between Technology and the economy

Innovation is pushing ahead at warp speed. We are certainly living through one of the most exciting periods in human history. The pace of change is so fast that even the technology of five years ago seems prehistoric.

Those of you who are students probably do not even remember a time when phones were not smart, when cameras contained film, when texts meant school books, and when wireless was a word used for old-fashioned radio!

This advance is centered on the rise of a global digital network—the “hyperconnected world”—combined with the rise of genuine machine intelligence. Today’s smart phones are more powerful than yesterday’s supercomputers. We see cars driving themselves, printers making complicated three-dimensional parts, and robots doing the most complex tasks. “Science fiction” is rapidly becoming “science fact”.

What does this all mean for our lives and livelihoods, for our common economic future?

If the previous revolutions were about using machines for brawn, this is about using machines for brains. And since technology is powering a giant leap in global interconnectivity, these are “connected” brains! Just look at some of the trends.

Certainly, we can see some worrying trends. For a start, the effects of new machine technology are not showing up in productivity statistics—at least not yet—and productivity is by far the most important driver of long-term economic growth.

Now I am not an expert on the Economy, but we are all touched by it and using common sense I for one can see that there is a looming problem. For instance one of the biggest worries is how technological innovation affects jobs put simply will machines leave even more workers behind?

You may not want to give this a second glance but even seasoned professionals can find themselves cast adrift on an unfamiliar ocean.

Rising inequality

My second point about rising inequalities is going to be brief. But here’s a little statistic for you to consider. According to Oxfam, almost half the world’s wealth is owned by one percent of the population and, stunningly, the bottom half of the world’s population owns the same as the richest 85 people in the world.

What is causing such a convulsion in the distribution of income? There is no single factor here, although it seems clear that technology is one of the major factors—it can create huge rewards for the extraordinary visionaries at the top, and huge anxieties for the ordinary workers at the bottom. The speed at which information is sent around the world means that the average disgruntled people who make up the 5 largest country can amplify unrest as they all voice their fears to the small percentage of the world wealth holders.

What about some solutions?

So finally what is the purpose of education in today’s 21 Century, I quote Jane Stanford of Standford University — “with a “spirit of equality”. One of her goals for the university was “to resist the tendency to the stratification of society, by keeping open an avenue whereby the deserving and exceptional may rise through their own efforts from the lowest to the highest stations in life”.

What has happened? Why have these large institutions priced education out of these fundamental principles?

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our humanity? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people?

It is clear that at the moment Educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material. It is evident that computers can do that for us! A 21st century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills. Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education and vocational education. I summarise in my words the following:

The purpose of education

The first and foremost purpose of education is to educate and give everyone equal opportunity as a means to succeed in life. Education is a way of igniting and enlightening the thought of an individual.

It should help learners to discriminate between knowledge and ignorance, help to create a spark and create the sense of realisation with logic and a way to reason why the other things are illogical.

The purpose of vocational education

Every man must have a vocation – a trade, a business, or a profession – (if they are able too) in order to earn his livelihood so that they can support themselves, their family and people who cannot help themselves in our society. There are institutions for imparting various types of specialised training to help people qualify for this. The specialist is in demand everywhere, – in the office as well as in factories, in educational institutions and governments.

Conclusion.

The traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility.

With the population dramatically ageing and low-level jobs increasingly swallowed up by machinery, entrepreneurship will be a necessity for many, rather than a life-style choice for some.

SMEs are of course already leading this charge but in order to gear up for the future we need to start off by asking a serious question, defining criteria’s, and examining trends, impact these trends will have and plan a way to jointly prepare current and future generations to be both employable and entrepreneurial.

We are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. And we are entering the new century with opportunity on our side but huge problems that require new thinking.

The Question we should all ask ourselves?

Do you think you have another 20 – 30 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Do you think you have another 30 – 50 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Do you think you have another 50 – 70 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Have you considered what you are going to do for the next 40- 70 years?

What will the job market look like in the next 20 years?

What will you be able to do to solve your problem which could be unemployment and patchy income streams?

What will you be able to do that will solve someone’s problem for which they will pay you a fee?

If computers might even replace our intelligence, they can never replace the capacities that make us truly human: our creativity and innovation, our passion.

So education must be the bridge between the present and future, the old and the new. But we must also build an enduring platform. By that I mean a new way of thinking about the global economy—the “new ©Entreployability the way forward.

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This is helping an individual to develop their ‘©Entreployability assets’ which comprise of their knowledge (i.e. what they know), skills (what they do with what they know) and attitudes (how they do it).

To help them keep busy or at work; engaging their skills and attentions to employ themselves independently and maintain work.

To help them organise and manages their own business, contracts or employability.

To help them be available to be hired, provide them with a safe platform to encourage them to supply soft or hard skill for solving problems or being of service for which they will be paid by another party.

Making sure that the skill they have can be updated to help support them firstly, their family and community and economy.

Looking for a short course this September to fit into your lifestyle?

Express Training courses (AVPT) have taken out all the stress of retraining by offering over 390 globally accredited courses in a way that fits in with you and your lifestyle. Now that you’ve decided to invest in your professional development it’s time to choose a study style that suits you. You can either work through a home study manual study online with an allocated personal tutor or in the classroom for an intensive one, two or three day course.

You can be confident in your future success with our fully trained and qualified

short course manuals from expresscoursestutors, they’re as dedicated to your personal development as you are about landing that big promotion, starting that passion project of a business venture, retraining or making that essential career move.

You don’t have to wait until you get home to pick up a text book and start learning, all you need is a tablet a smart phone and an eager mind. With AVPT studying and fitting your professional development around your work life and personal responsibilities has never been easier or more rewarding.

With courses covering everything from Hotel management, Leadership Skills, Marketing and Sales through to Hair extensions and of course becoming one of our virtual teaching facilitators, taking the first step towards being a better version of you has never been easier. Get in touch today and you can boost your skills and be qualified in a matter of hours instead of months

Start your own business in less than a month

Start your own business in less than a month

 

Diane Shawe M.Ed approved Business Start up Loan Mentor’ for Enterprising Women & Virgin Startup

Diane Shawe Host KCW Enterprise Womens Club

Diane Shawe Host KCW Enterprise Womens Club

PRESS RELEASE

Contact: Diane Shawe M.Ed

London UK, Tuesday 5th August 2014 – A successful UK entrepreneur and CEO has announces that she is now working with Enterprising Women to begin providing support and assistance to women from all walks of life who are looking to secure funding for brand new business ventures.

Diane Shawe Start up loan mentor

Diane Shawe Start up loan mentor

The range of supportive mentor services now available provides individuals with comprehensive guidance and support to identify and secure start-up funding, available from a range of providers. Diane Shawe is an accredited and certified ‘Enterprising Women’ startup loans mentor, ‘Virgin Startup Mentor’ and a registered leadership training provider for government backed ‘GrowthAccelerator’ initiative.

virgin startup loan mentors

Virgin startup loan mentors

The specific funding providers offer clients a viable means to secure the required capital to get their businesses off the ground through a range of financial contributions and matched funding. In addition to the practical support and advice to secure the startup loans required, Diane Shawe offers comprehensive mentoring which goes beyond forms and paperwork guidance. Drawing on her extensive experience in achieving decades of business success, she is able to pass on critical experience which money simply can’t buy.

About Diane Shaw M.Ed

leadership coursed for women diane shawe expresscourses

Growing your business? find out how GrowthAccelerator could help.

Diane Shawe M.Ed has proven her ability and aptitude in the business world with a string of successes and accolades including being the chief executive officer of a leading professional and vocational training provider, an acclaimed keynote speaker, published author, certified WEBE a member of the Chartered Management Institute (FCMI) and was recently a 2014 finalist at the Federation Small Business London for Innovation. For further information on the ‘business startup loan mentor’ program, please visit http://www.get.mentoring.dianeshawe.info or alternatively use the contact details shown with this release.

 

 

Hair pulling disorder (Trichotillomania) often unreported article by Diane Shawe

Silent Sufferers of Trichotillomania

Silent Sufferers of Trichotillomania

Compulsive hair pulling, understanding and treating with hair extensions.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

Trichotillomania (pronounced /ˌtrɪkəˌtɪləˈmniə/ TRIK-ə-TIL-ə-MAY-NEE, also known as trichotillosis or hair pulling disorder) is an impulse disorder characterised by the compulsive urge to pull out (and in some cases, eat) one’s own hair leading to noticeable hair loss and balding, distress, and social or functional impairment. It appears in the ICD chapter 5 on Mental and behavioral disorders and is often chronic and difficult to treat.

Trichotillomania may be present in infants, but the mis conception that the peak age of onset is 9 to 13 understated to say the least.  It is estimated that 3.4 % of women suffer this and around 1.5% men.

Crowning Glory hair extension technique

Crowning Glory hair extension technique

It may be triggered by depression or stress. Owing to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to accurately predict. Common areas for hair to be pulled out are the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows, legs, arms, hands, nose and the pubic areas.

I have been involved in the hair extension sector for over 30 years.  I have seen clients attend my salon and whilst waiting to get their hair extensions put in I have witnessed them pulling their hair out.

Often these clients are unaware that they have a disorder are sometime highly strung or very nervous.

So what are the symptons?

People who suffer from trichotillomania are said to often pull only one hair at a time and these hair pull episodes can last for hours at a time. Trichotillomania can go into remission-like states where the individual may not experience the urge to “pull” for days, weeks, months, and even years.

I had a client who would bit by bit feel the urge to snip of single hair strands at a time and could not stop snipping with her very small scissors.  It was vital for her to have these scissors at hand at all times.

Individuals with trichotillomania exhibit hair of differing lengths; some are broken hairs with blunt ends, some new growth with tapered ends, some broken mid-shaft, or some uneven stubble. Scaling on the scalp is not present, overall hair density is normal, and a hair pull test is negative (the hair does not pull out easily). Hair is often pulled out leaving an unusual shape. Individuals with trichotillomania may be secretive or shameful of the hair pulling behavior.

Hook & Latch Technique No glue, threads or cornrows.

Hook & Latch Technique No glue, threads or cornrows.

An additional psychological effect can be low self-esteem, often associated with being shunned by peers and the fear of socialising due to appearance and negative attention they may receive.

Some people with trichotillomania wear hats, wigs, false eyelashes, eyebrow pencil, or style their hair in an effort to disguise the probem. There seems to be a strong stress-related component and some individuals with trichotillomania may feel they are the only person with this problem due to the low rates of reporting.

Hair dressers are usually the first to work with clients who may have this problem, and whilst washing, blow drying and back combing with hair spray or using big rollers under a hair dryer to add volume, this does not assist the client in the long term.

Hair enhancement (hair extensions) techniques have come a long way.  Techniques such as Crowning glory, Hair to skin, lace wigs, the net weave and the hook and latch can provide instant gratification.

During this process I have also witnessed the clients change of habit in pulling out their hair because they pay much more attention to not pulling out their hair extensions.

Habit reversal Training can help.

Whilst I agree that certain Habit reversal training (HRT) has the highest rate of success in treating trichotillomania. HRT has been shown to be a successful adjunct to medication as a way to treat trichotillomania. With HRT, the individual is trained to learn to recognise their impulse to pull and also teach them to redirect this impulse. I believe that hair extensions speed up this process because the suffer has a completely different mindset to the hair that has been added to help disguise their problem whilst giving the appearance of a lovely healthy head of hair.

Net Weave Hair enhancement technique

Net Weave Hair enhancement technique

Any hair enhancement technique should be light, non intrusive, well blended and easy to manage.  One of the most effective techniques could be the Hook and Latch hair extension technique.  However if the client has damaged the hair line, the most effective system would be a lace wig applied without using any bonding agents.

The Hair Extension Training Academy offer five hair enhancement techniques designed to work with clients who suffer from alopechia, trichotillomania, hair loss due to medication or severe thinning hair.

Try out our 1 day hook and latch hair extension technique course and you can see for yourself the benefits to the client.

1 day hair extension course for just 150.00 UK