Monthly Archives: December 2015

Chunking information as a learning strategy: Micro Learning by Diane Shawe

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

One of my educational heroes is George A. Miller[1], a Princeton professor who died a few years ago. Miller is considered one of the greats of twentieth-century psychology. I often quote Miller’s law (for those who have heard me speak it is about a toaster that talks) and am struck by his effect on modern learning. At AVPT Short Courses ltd, we are proud that we can deliver very high quality online learning in days rather than years.

The courses are accessible by using tablets, ipads, smart phones and laptops and works on the principle of chunking up material into bite size micro content.  This aide’s memory, improves recall and the  ability to learn rapidly. So what is the science of chunking?

‘Chunking’ refers to organising or grouping separate pieces of information together. When information is ‘chunked’ into groups, you can remember the information easier by remembering the groups as opposed to each piece of information separately. The types of groups can also act as a cue to help you remember what is in each group. Chunking, in psychology, is a phenomenon whereby individuals group responses when performing a memory task. Tests where individuals can demonstrate “chunking” commonly include serial and free recall tasks. All three tasks require the individual to reproduce items that he or she had previously been instructed to study.

There are several ways to chunk information. Chunking techniques include grouping, finding patterns, and organising. The technique you use to chunk will depend on the information you are chunking. Sometimes more than one technique will be possible but with some practice and insight it will be possible to determine which technique will work best for you.

You can organise information into groups arbitrarily. For example if you have to remember a 10 digit number you can group it into pairs of numbers and remember 5 two digit numbers.

Another way to chunk information is by finding patterns in the information. When you find a pattern in information you just need to remember the pattern rather than a list of separate pieces of information. For example, if you have to remember the letter sequence ADGJMPSVY you may notice that these letters are just every third letter of the alphabet. So instead of remembering each individual letter, you can just remember the pattern used to find these letters.

Another chunking technique involves organising the information based on its meaning. For example, let’s say you have to memorise the age of everyone in a group of people. You can chunk the information by organising people by their age, then, for each age group, remember the people that belong to that group.

Chunking information can also help overcome some of the limitations of short term memory. We can generally only have 7 plus or minus 2 things in our short term memory at a time. However, by chunking information we can remember more. For example, if you have to commit a list of 11 numbers to your short term memory you likely won’t be able to. However, by grouping the numbers into chunks, you will greatly increase your chances of doing it.

The word ‘’chunking’’ is from a 1956 paper by my hero George Miller, The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information[2]. At a time when information theory was beginning to be applied in psychology, Miller observed that some human cognitive tasks fit the model of a “channel capacity,” characterised by a roughly constant capacity in bits, but short-term memory did not. A variety of studies could be summarised by saying that short-term memory had a capacity of about “seven plus-or-minus two” chunks.

Miller wrote that “With binary items the span is about nine and, although it drops to about five with monosyllabic English words, the difference is far less than the hypothesis of constant information would require. The span of immediate memory seems to be almost independent of the number of bits per chunk, at least over the range that has been examined to date.” Miller acknowledged that “we are not very definite about what constitutes a chunk of information.” Miller noted that according to this theory, it should be possible to effectively increase short-term memory for low-information-content items by mentally recoding them into a smaller number of high-information-content items. “It is a little dramatic to watch a person get 40 binary digits in a row and then repeat them back without error. However, if you think of this merely as a mnemonic trick for extending the memory span, you will miss the more important point that is implicit in nearly all such mnemonic devices. The point is that recoding is an extremely powerful weapon for increasing the amount of information that we can deal with.”

Using this as a basis, AVPT Short courses is committed to micro content and the chunking methodology to take out the traditional rote learning styles and avoiding large tracts of materials, making them more accessible and improving learning results. As a result of Miller’s work we can justifiably claim that achieve learning in days, not years. Thanks George!


[1] George Armitage Miller  died o July 22, 2012. He was one of the founders of cognitive psychology.  He also made seminal contributions to psycholinguistics and cognitive science in general. He authored several books and directed the development of WordNet, an online word-linkage database usable by computer programs. He authored the paper, “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two,” which experimentally discovered an average limit of seven for human short-term memory capacity.

[2] Miller, G.A. (1956), The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information. Psychological Review, 63, 81-97.

Get qualified whist on the move

Get qualified whist on the move

10 Top Tips on How to Influence Online buying by Diane Shawe

Try out 5 Courses this Christmas for just £25.00

Try out 5 Courses this Christmas for just £25.00

The trends and predictions are already in for 2016. Many digital advancements will be made in 2016, from the rise of mobile messaging apps to mobile commerce finally gaining some mojo. 

You the reader even you are becoming more savvy and intend to be heard when things are not going right.  Smartphone use is driving up the number of inbound calls to businesses. Voice-activated search has been rising steadily. Consumers are talking to personal assistants through their smartphones and cars, and those “assistants” are getting smarter. And with the rise of smart watches and connected home devices, they’re talking to a wider variety of devices from various locations.

Marketers need to be prepared and ready to optimise digital content for speech-based (not keyword) queries and learn how to make sure that content can be discovered by personal assistants.

– So what about small businesses, the lone sole trader, what can you do to influence online buying?

  1. Change your ads Your prospects could get bored seeing the same ad all the time. Statistics show people usually see the same ad 7 times before they actually buy. Just change them enough to keep them from being over-exposed. For example, if your ad said. “FREE Killer Marketing E-book!”, you could change it later on to “FREE Sizzling Marketing E-book!”
  2. Give people a deadline to order. Tell people if they order by January 15 2016, they will get a discount or free bonuses. This will create an urgency so they don’t put off buying. Another example, “Order before 8:00 p.m. and get a second product of your choice for free!”
  3. Publish testimonials on your ad copy. They will give your business credibility and you’ll gain people’s It’s important to include the person’s full name and location with the testimonial.
  4. Allow people to make money reselling the product or Tell people they can join your affiliate program if they order. You could pay them per sale, per click, per referral, etc. Just provide them with proven and tested marketing materials, detailed statistics and plenty of affiliate training.
  5. Offer a buy-one, get-one-free deal. If you sell more than one product, this type of deal works People will feel they are getting more for their money and will order quicker. You could also offer them a ‘buy one, get one half’, ‘buy two, get the third one free’, ‘buy two, get a free watch’.
  6. Have them sign up to get access to download a free e-book. The subject of the e-book should be related to your target audience. You could have them sign up to a opt-in list or your regular The e-book should have high perceived value so they’ll take the time to sign up. Landing pages are really good for this.
  7. Give your visitors a free membership inside your Members Only web site or closed membership group on LinkedIn or Facebook. Have them sign up to receive a user name and password or an exclusive invitation. Members groups are particularly good on LinkedIn and your blogs because each time you post some news they get an automatic update.
  8. Offer your visitors free consulting via e-mail. Have them fill out a web form to e-mail you with their When you answer their questions, include an offer for a product you sell or highly recommend products that could help them. You could join the product’s affiliate program to earn commission if they take your advice.
  9. Give people free bonuses when they order your product or The free bonuses could be books, jewelry, reports, newsletters, etc. Make their bonuses sound extra valuable by listing their retail value, either separately or together in one amount, or limiting how long you will offer the bonuses. (you can partner with free gift websites)
  10. Provide free package and postage with all orders. If you can’t afford it, you could offer free P&P on orders over a specific You could also offer a rebate on their P&P costs. Most customers probably won’t send in the rebate card unless it’s a huge shipping cost, for example, £30 or more

Try our Audio Courses this Christmas.

Niche Marketing Made Easy

Produce Persuasive Copyright

Building online Traffic and List Systems

Email Marketing secrets

How to set up and generate a powerful Blog website

The Affiliate Chemistry

7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Internet Business Optimisation

12 Effective selling techniques

50 Best and Worse Business Deals of all time

20 Advertising Tips

Art of Making money

Breakthrough Sales Solutions

Clever Profit Generating Insights

How to Combine Cooperation & Competition

Customer Tested – Buying Triggers

How to work with change

Explosive Influence Tactics

Extreme Persuasion Strategies

Manage your Intellectual Capital

The Servant Power Leadership

Visit www.crashcourses.academy and select 5 course and start listening, watching and learning today.

Where does the hair come from for Hair Extensions? by Diane Shawe

where does hair extensions come from by diane shaweDiane Shawe Author of “How Hair Extensions are Sourced, Treated and Graded” states that the first question all new customers ask is “where did the hair come from”?

They want to know about the geography and even history of the hair and so should you. In her book she covers this question by explaining the characteristics of each variety and summarises the pros and cons.

For instance dealing with the different hair origins.

Get your copy today from amazon.co.uk

Get your copy today from amazon.co.uk

· Origin: China, Eastern Europe, Russia and India

· Grade: Virgin, Cuticle, Non-Cuticle, Processed, Single Drawn, Double Drawn, Remy and Non-Remy

· Type: Caucasian, Asian

Diane’s book goes on to explain in some detail the differences, here we summarise the pros and cons from different regions.

Chinese Hair (Aka Asian Hair): A thick fibre that is naturally straight and dark brown to black in colour.

Advantages: High Quantity, Durability and Low Cost. It is the strongest human hair and is able to withstand multiple chemical and mechanical processes.

Disadvantages: Chinese hair requires extensive chemical processing to output hair that simulates European texture, colour and body. The majority of the hair is collected and processed as double drawn.

Indian Hair (aka Asian Hair, Italian Hair): A variety of fibre types from fine and straight, medium thick with body wave and curly to thick coarse hair. “Italian hair” is actually Indian hair that has been processed in Italy or Spain and then sold at premium prices.

Advantages: High Quantity, Good Quality, Variety and Low Manufacturing Cost. Indian hair is popular to use for custom made hairpieces because it can be made to resemble European hair. When not cuticle correct (non-remy) hair requires heavy-duty chemicals to remove cuticle layers. It is still at a high risk for severe tangling problems.

Disadvantages: Low Quality and Higher Retail Cost. Indian hair still requires quite a lot of chemical processing to make it appear as European hair. To reduce time and materials, many manufacturers choose to work with non-remy Indian hair that results in a poorer quality and most exporters handle the hair badly.

European Hair

(Aka Russian Hair, Caucasian Hair): A fine to medium density fibre that is naturally straight to slight wave and available in a variety of natural colours, most commonly dark blonds to medium browns. The Virgin colours will often be streaked with lighter shades or the ends will be much lighter than the roots due to weathering.

Advantages: High Quality. True Caucasian hair, whether originating from Russia, Eastern Europe or even the United States, is the best quality for the European and American market.

Disadvantages: Low Quantity and quantity and High Cost. It has always been an availability problem and is becoming more difficult to source lengths longer than 15 inches and of a good quality.

For more information about Diane’s extensive work on hair loss and consultancy, please see her website

For a copy of her book you can visit Amazon and download the full version or a sample “How Hair Extensions are Sourced, Treated and Graded”

Getting you qualified in the Hair Extension Sector

Getting you qualified in the Hair Extension Sector

 

Managing Pressure and Maintaining work balance

How to manage pressure at work 1 day course

When things are extremely busy at work and you have your hands full with many tasks and dealing with difficult people, having skills you can draw on are essential for peace of mind and growth. This one-day course will help participants understand the causes and costs of workplace pressure, the benefits of creating balance, and how to identify pressure points. They will also learn how to apply emotional intelligence, increase optimism and resilience, and develop strategies for getting ahead.

This one-day workshop will help participants learn how to:

  • o   Apply a direct understanding of pressure points and their costs and payoffs
  • o   Speak in terms related to emotional intelligence, optimism, and resilience
  • o   Create a personalized toolkit for managing stressors and anger
  • o   Work on priorities and achieve defined goals

 Cick to book your seat now.

Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Under Pressure!

To begin the course, participants will explore the causes and costs of workplace pressure as well as the benefits of creating balance. Participants will also learn what their pre-assignment score means.

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

Next, participants will learn how to identify their pressure points and create an action plan to manage them. They will also learn some tips for facing problems and when to seek help.

Emotional Intelligence

In this session, participants will learn about the seven human emotions and Plutchik’s wheel of emotions. They will also learn how to validate emotions in others, build optimism, and develop resilience.

Coping Toolkit

This session will give participants some ways to manage stress, cope with anger, and express themselves assertively.

Getting Organised

To wrap things up, participants will learn some ways to get organised and reduce pressure set up a action plan.

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

https://academyexpresscourses.com/2014/03/28/high-blood-pressure-hypertension-the-new-aids-epidemic/

nido how to move forward

http://www.shortcourses.expert

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