Category Archives: alopecia

What are the main benefits of FUE over FUT Hair Transplant Procedures

ARTICLE BY DIANE SHAWE

Follicular unit transplantation (FUT) is a hair restoration technique, also known as the strip procedure, where a patient’s hair is transplanted in naturally occurring groups of 1 to 4 hairs, called follicular units. Follicular units also contain sebaceous (oil) glands, nerves, a small muscle, and occasional fine vellus hairs. In follicular unit transplantation, these small units allow the surgeon to safely transplant thousands of grafts in a single session, which maximizes the cosmetic impact of the procedure.

Additionally it is recorded that the risk of long term nerve damage, leading to chronic numbness and/or pain in the donor area can be a side effect of the FUT procedure.

Follicular unit extraction (FUE) is a great surgical option for patients who want to restore their hair with minimal discomfort and scarring. FUE is considered by many to be the most refined approach to hair transplantation.

However, with FUE, the follicles are harvested from a much greater area of the donor zone compared to FUT, estimated to be eight times greater than that of traditional strip excision so requires patients to have hairs trimmed in a much larger donor area

FUE provides an alternative to FUT when the scalp is too tight for a strip excision and enables a hair transplant surgeon to harvest finer hair from the nape of the neck to be used at the hairline or for eyebrows.

Follicular unit extraction (FUE) generally has a quicker patient recovery time and significantly lower post-operative discomfort than follicular unit transplantation (FUT).

The verdict

The survival of follicular units upon extraction (FUE) from the scalp is one of the key variables of successful hair transplantation. If follicular units are transected in the extraction process, there is a greater likelihood that they will not survive the transplant, and the hair transplant will fail. While FUT procedures using strip-harvesting of follicular units typically guarantees a large number of non-transected follicular units. It really depends on the client and the overall visual outcome they want to achieve as to which technique they use and how deep their pockets are.

Alternatives

However there are some new non evasive hair enhancement toupee in the market place which provide instant gratification and is easy on the pocket.

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10 Ways to Boost your Hair Extensions Business by Diane Shawe

Article by Diane Shawe Author: Extracts from Getting Started in the Hair Extensions Business

Sometimes you find things are going great and then the big slump takes a hold. How can you evaluate what you have done right and where you are going wrong?

Doing a SWOT analysis will give you a true picture of how your hair extension business could or should be running. It is essential to work out why some things are working in your business and why some are

SWOT stands for ‘strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats’. It is a well-known term in business and marketing. Performing a SWOT analysis is a very important part of running the business. It must be taken seriously

It is your own audit of your business no matter the size of it and should be done on a regular basis, at least annually. It’s not very complicated but could help keep you ahead of your competitors.

You may discover problems that you had no idea even existed. These can be addressed before they get out of hand. It will also highlight many assets, which could be utilised better, even opportunities, which could be taken advantage of.

The results of your SWOT analysis will be the basis for your marketing plans and decisions.

‘What they don’t tell you about getting started in the hair extension business’ summary from page 20 – 35 author Shawe D 2007

1) Form business alliances

Join up with other businesses to help each other build a bigger clientele.

Form an alliance with another business that has the same type of clientele as yours, for instance a business which involves beauty, nails, tanning, or fashion.

You can take this alliance as far as you like. You could set up shop together, or just refer clients to each other. You could do some advertising together and share the cost. Another idea is to hand out gift vouchers for each other. Each gift voucher could be for a free service.

It’s best if you both cater to clients who are at the same end of the market.

There’s not much point in marketing to people who simply can’t afford to come to your hair extension studio or pay for your services.
2. Choosing a Business

Choose a business where the people have the same business ethics as yours and a good database of clients.


3) Network

Throw the occasional cocktail party and invite the surrounding business owners, managers and employees of your choice. If you can build relationships with these people you may gain them as clients. Remember most men have girlfriends or wives and most women have other lady friends also.

They might also refer some of their customers and friends to you. Do this especially with the staff of beauty and fashion shops in your area. They are ideal people to get referrals from.
4) Get Quality Training

There are over 36 different hair extension techniques in the market place. If you really want to plan to be a success in this market, then you have to choose to become totally proficient in several techniques. There are many types of clients out there with varying hair problems, plan to be of service to you target market. Restricting yourself is restricting your potential income.


5) Be Classy (even if your working from home)

It’s best to set your hair extension studio up so that the right impact is made right from the moment the clients make an entrance or you make an entrance. Remember that the more professional the hair extension studio looks, the more you will be able to charge, as you will attract a more up market clientele. I always advise that the overall look must not out way the warmth and welcome of the studio. Clients like to feel relaxed with the staff and environment, not as if they are on show.
6) Flowers at reception or at your home always add a touch of class.

So does a smiling face, which helps to make each client’s, visit a welcoming visit right from the start. You can make the waiting area more impressive by including a great retail area, some hair extension brochures, and a book containing before and after photos. Provide some new, interesting magazines and hair books. Toss the old or torn ones out.
7) Always protect the clients clothing.

There should be a cupboard or rack for coats, or like some hair dressers have, a small dressing room for clients, who are given a gown to wear. This is a great idea as it removes the problem of high collars being in the way and clothes being ruined.


8) Get rid of shabby items.

Make sure there is a place for everything and enough storage space, so that the hair extension studio can be kept tidy. Get rid of the old wraps, used or shabby towels, and worn brushes. Never have dirty combs or tongs lying around. All of these things make a bad impression on clients.
9) No Carrier bags or damaged cases.

If you are mobile don’t turn up with carrier bags or a damaged beauty case. Make sure you are presentable and that your hair looks emaculate.
10) Don’t be afraid to change with the times.

If your hair extension studio starts to look outdated give it a facelift. Invest in the latest equipment. Make sure that the chairs not only look good, but also feel comfortable. If you are mobile make sure your equipment is up to date in line with your techniques.

The most valuable ebook for your hair extension business Click to order

What they don’t tell you Visit www.needahairmakeover.com to view a selection of 1 day courses.

Call us on 0121 318 2880 to discuss our courses we train in over 14 different techniques or if you would like to book an appointment to have your hair extensions done

Undercutting your Hair Extensions Competition


Extracted from Getting Started in the Hair Extension Business by Diane Shawe

If your hair extension studio is a real under-cutter, care will have to be taken to keep costs as low as realistic as possible.

Don’t be shy when it comes to taking money for your services. Charge for the value of the benefits that you offer.

You must put a value on your services; look at your type of clientele, hair extension location, experience of employees, your clients’ needs and, the prices of the competition.

Price is sometimes seen as a sign of quality and value. Price can attract like-minded customers. They think that because your prices are high, the technician in your hair extension studio must be good. If your prices are high, it is important to promote to the high paying customers, the value of your service.

There are a lot of competitors, so low prices alone, might not be enough to keep the low paying customers coming back. Clients who look for bargains are not only looking for low prices, but they want to get great results too.

You must determine how much value you can offer. To be of value to clients, you must know what the clients’ needs are. Understand what benefits they wish to receive, what pain they want to relieve.

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The benefits they want might be a quick service with no waiting, or it could be that they want an expert doing their hair. They might prefer certain products used on their hair, or to know that they can be squeezed in at short notice occasionally.

Their pain might be that they begrudge spending time on their hair, or that they loathe technicians who don’t listen to them. It might be that they just haven’t found the right retail products to use at home.

Profit margins will be low, so a lot of clients will have to go through the hair extension studio, just for you to be able to pay the overheads. It will most likely mean offering fewer services and probably, rushing clients through. Even the employees will have to be paid a low salary.

In some cases, this could mean that the employees are much less experienced than you may like. You really need to decide on what sort of employees you want in your hair extension studio. You will find that the best technicians won’t want to work in a cheap hair extensions studio. Not only would it hurt their reputations, but they wouldn’t work for a low salary.

Your clientele will most likely be bargain hunters who probably won’t spend on retail products either.

Charge by experience
If your employees have exceptional skills or experience, you can charge more. If you promote these benefits well, you’ll find that clients don’t mind paying extra. A lot of clients don’t mind paying for the name, or the prestige.

Some hair extension studios charge by the experience of the hair technician performing the service. As employees reach certain levels of experience, they charge more. This seems to work very well for them.

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BBC News Reports on Alopecia patients call for NHS to fund real hair wigs

People with alopecia want better access to good quality wigs to help with the psychological impacts of the condition

The NHS should fund real hair wigs for people with alopecia and better recognise the psychological impacts, people with the condition have said.

Julie Mees was diagnosed more than two years ago after her mother noticed a bald patch the size of a coin on the back of her head.The hair loss has since worsened, and she will eventually be completely bald.NHS Wales funds wigs for patients with hair loss but they are often made with synthetic hair.

The Welsh Government said health boards were given a list of approved suppliers to choose from for patients who have alopecia, burns or have lost hair because of treatments such as chemotherapy.

They also help patients with fitting and styling.But it is up to each health board how much funding they provide – meaning people in some areas could be offered more to buy a wig than others. Former lecturer Ms Mees, from Barry, said the £50 voucher she was given would only buy a synthetic wig from a specific shop, and she was not able to offset that against the cost of going private. She saved £600 of her own money for a real hair topper – a type of mini wig.

“They give you a voucher to take to a shop for what I call a ‘wiggy wig’… like a fancy dress costume, which look awful and do absolutely nothing for the person’s emotional and psychological needs,” she said. “Your hair is the first thing people see… I’ve always had long hair, it’s part of my identity.

“I’m losing it all and that’s emotionally hard, it’s very difficult.”It’s a case of if you have good finances, you can live life normally.”

Ms Mees added those overwhelmed by the search for good quality wigs could end up paying over the odds, and she had since found a supplier for half the price she originally paid.

Diane Shawe Top Hair Extensions and Hairloss Educator, Consultant and author in two of her recent blogs about hairloss tackled the subject of wigs.

Click to read articles here:

https://academyexpresscourses.com/2017/03/17/20-different-hairloss-conditions-you-should-know-about/

https://academyexpresscourses.com/2018/10/17/benefits-of-silk-base-wigs-and-why-alopecia-chemotherapy-hair-loss-condition-customers-should-use-these-types-of-wigs-by-diane-shawe/

Moira Jones’ 18-year-old son Thomas Barry, from Cardiff, has had alopecia universalis – complete loss of hair from the scalp and body. He started losing his hair when he was 11, and it was gone within three months.

Doctors believe his body is producing an allergic reaction, reacting as though hair is a disease – but no treatment has helped so far.

Ms Jones has paid more than £2,000 for two wigs for her son but neither was suitable. She said she was not helped by the NHS in her search and her son has never been offered counselling.”He was really strong, stronger than everybody else around him,” she added.

Thomas wore two beanie hats – in case one fell off – to hide his scalp during his teenage years, even during sleepovers and in the heat of summer. When he went to Camp America last summer, his hair began to grow back in the sunshine – but fell out on his return to the UK.

While Thomas’ experiences abroad have given him the confidence to go without a hat at university, Ms Jones feels the family should have received more support.

Betsi Cadwaladr, Cwm Taf, Hywel Dda, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Aneurin Bevan health boards said they fund two wigs per person annually. They said all suppliers go through a procurement process to ensure quality.

Cardiff and Vale and Powys health boards were also asked to comment. Amy Johnson, from the charity Alopecia UK , said: “For many people with alopecia, wearing a wig is an essential part of managing the psychological impact of losing their hair; those who wear wigs for medical necessity don’t see their wig as an optional luxury.

“The charity hears from individuals who struggle to go to work or school, or even leave the house. There should be provision within the NHS to support individuals with access to suitable wigs.”

Source: ews