Category Archives: appointments

Global Personal Bloggers of Influence for 2017

When twitter came out and account holders tweeted what they ate, we all thought twitter had a short life span.  Now the media rummages through top celebrities tweets to find something sensationable to report about.  Would be employers have been know to use candidates social media postings as evidence against them.
The era of the Personal style bloggers use to get caricatured as either geeks or pretty, brainless girls who dress up for their camera-wielding boyfriends and post their results to a WordPress blog.
But wait a minute, with instagram, Facebook, linkedin and twitter integration most of these bloggers have grown quiet influential with hundred of thousands of followers. Over the past decade, these independent publishers have become a real force in the fashion industry — not just snapping up front row seats at fashion shows, but landing major campaigns and collaborations with brands, becoming regular guests on TV shows like “Today” and “America’s Next Top Model,” and turning their blogs into multimillion-dollar businesses. Some have become household names. Independent European bloggers are harder to pin down as most of them are linked to magazines.
Chiara Ferragni, Hanneli Mustaparta and Nicole Warne. Photo: Clemens Bilan/Stringer

Chiara Ferragni, Hanneli Mustaparta and Nicole Warne. Photo: Clemens Bilan/Stringer

To determine the ranking, consideraction was given to:

  • Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest followers, as well as website traffic. These numbers gave us a snapshot of how many people these bloggers are reaching every day.
  • Brand extensions. We gave props to bloggers who have used their influence to create original products.
  • It factor. We talked to industry insiders about whom advertisers are loving right now, and who is moving the most products via affiliate links.
  • Google News searches. Headline makers were rewarded for extending their reach beyond their own network.
Chiara Ferragni. Photo: Jason Merritt for Getty Images Entertainment

Chiara Ferragni. Photo: Jason Merritt for Getty Images Entertainment

1. Chiara Ferragni, The Blonde Salad 
The 27-year-old Italian, who now lives in Los Angeles, has the broadest reach of any individual fashion blogger on our list, with more than 3 million Instagram followers. She’s a global star, as popular in Europe as she is in the U.S. What’s more, links from her site drive traffic and conversions, according to many of the brands with whom she has partnered. She was also recently named to an expert panel that will help determine the shortlist.

Oh, and she graced the cover of Lucky magazine’s February issue along with fellow bloggers Nicole Warne and Zanita Whittington.

2. Aimee Song, Song of Style 
Song, 28, is a Los Angeles-based interior designer whose straightforward street-style shots have made her popular with brands and readers alike. Song also has an incredible Instagram following — 1.9 million — and has worked hard to build her YouTube audience as well, with more than 28,000 subscribers to her channel.

3. Wendy Nguyen, Wendy’s Lookbook 
Yet another L.A.-based blogger, Nguyen, 31, is best known for her YouTube channel, which currently boasts 600,000-plus subscribers. (Her 2011 video, “25 Ways to Tie a Scarf” has been viewed over 29 million times.) Nguyen’s point of view is unique in that she grew up in the foster system, and has opened up about her experiences to her readers.

Kristina Bazan. Photo: Frazer Harrison for Getty Images Entertainment

Kristina Bazan. Photo: Frazer Harrison for Getty Images Entertainment

4. Kristina Bazan, Kayture 
This Swiss-model blogger, 21, has an impressive reach on Facebook — with more than 1.1 million likes — in addition to a major presence on Instagram, Twitter, etc. Bazan is a favorite of high-end brands: she’s worked with Louis Vuitton, Hugo Boss and Piaget, among others.

5. Julie Sariñana, Sincerely Jules
The 29-year-old blogger, who lives in Los Angeles, started her site in 2009 — early, compared to many of her peers. Her easy, approachable style has translated well into her own line of t-shirts, printed with often inspirational, occasionally irreverent, quotes.

6. Rumi Neely, Fashion Toast 
Neely, 31, launched Fashion Toast in 2007. Her particular style of blogging — photo-heavy posts featuring cool clothes and model poses — has greatly influenced the generation of influencers who have followed her. While Neely has collaborated with established brands in the past, she recently launched her own line. Are You Am I, a collection of slip dresses, tap pants and distinctly cut tees, is notable for its specificity. For fans who want to emulate Neely’s style — and there are plenty of them — there is nothing more perfect.

7. Nicole Warne, Gary Pepper Girl 
One of three bloggers to land Lucky‘s February 2015 cover, the Sydney-based Warne, 25, first launched Gary Pepper as a vintage e-commerce site in 2009. Warne started out blogging and modeling the clothes as a way to market the website, and by 2011, it was one of the largest online vintage retailers in Australia. However, the young entrepreneur’s side project soon became the main event, and in 2012 she shut down the e-commerce leg of Gary Pepper to focus on her blog-driven business.

Blair Eadie. Photo: Cindy Ord for Getty Images Entertainment

Blair Eadie. Photo: Cindy Ord for Getty Images Entertainment

8. Blair Eadie, Atlantic-Pacific 
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers.

9. Julia Engel, Gal Meets Glam 
The San Francisco-based Engel, 23, is seen as an up-and-comer in the space. She’s already amassed a large following across platforms, from Pinterest to Instagram. Appealing to the same sorts of readers who worship Lauren Conrad’s pretty aesthetic, Engel’s site is easy to navigate, with lots of opportunities to shop affiliate links.

10. Nicolette Mason 
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target’s new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including “Today” and “Good Morning America.” Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image.

11. Shea Marie: Peace, Love Shea 
The Los Angeles-based blogger and TV host, 27, has the high-fashion-meets-Southern-California look brands eat up. She’s worked with the likes of Dior, Gucci, H&M and Guess.

Bryanboy. Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris for Getty Images Entertainment

Bryanboy. Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris for Getty Images Entertainment

12. Bryanboy 
The OG fashion blogger and best friend of Fashion Toast‘s Rumi Neely, the New York-based, Philippines-bred Bryan Grey Yambao has transformed from an online-diary keeper to a celebrity and fashion insider. While other bloggers from his era have fallen off the map, Yambao, 32, has remained relevant by branching out. Memorable projects include a collection with furrier Adrienne Landau and a hosting spot on several seasons of “America’s Next Top Model.”

13. Elin Kling
The New York-based Kling, who is Swedish, was one of the first bloggers to collaborate with a brand on a collection. (In 2011, H&Mreleased a Kling-designed line.) But her fantastic stand-alone label, Toteme, has transformed Kling, 31, from a blogger to a full-fledged designer.

14. Zanita Whittington
The Stockholm-based Aussie, 28, was one of Lucky‘s February cover stars. Along with modeling and blogging, Whittington is also serious about photography. Her site is a sort of “how to” for aspiring bloggers, with service pieces on starting a blog and building an audience.

Gabi Gregg. Photo: Ilya S. Savenok for Getty Images Entertainment

Gabi Gregg. Photo: Ilya S. Savenok for Getty Images Entertainment

15. Gabi Gregg, Gabifresh
One of three plus-size bloggers chosen to star in the campaign for Target’s new Ava & Viv collection, Gregg started her blog in 2008 when she couldn’t find an entry-level job in fashion journalism. Now 28 and based in Los Angeles, the blogger has appeared on the “Today” show, designed a sell-out swimwear collection, and partnered with brands including Misguided, Nordstrom and Laura Mercier.

16. Danielle Bernstein, We Wore What
The New York-based blogger, 23, started her site as an FIT undergrad eager to capture the style of her fellow students. It soon transformed into a personal style forum, leading to a design project with Topshop.

17.  Jessica Stein, Tuula Vintage
This Sydney-based blogger, 25, spends a good chunk of her time traveling, and sharing her adventures via Instagram. (She’s currently parked in the Maldives.) Brands like Dior Beauty partner with her for the obvious reasons: she has great taste and an enviable life.

Susanna Lau. Photo: Cindy Ord for Getty Images Entertainment

Susanna Lau. Photo: Cindy Ord for Getty Images Entertainment

18. Susanna Lau, Style Bubble
Forever the no. 1 blogger to fashion insiders, the 31-year-old Lau is now one of the industry’s leading voices. While her creative outfit posts are still appreciated, she is even more loved for her sharp opinion, contributing to publications including Elle UK and Business of Fashion, as well as posting regularly on her own site.

19. Chriselle Lim, The Chriselle Factor
With a massive YouTube following, the Los Angeles-based wardrobe stylist, 29, offers her audience plenty of tips and tricks via video. She’s worked with brands including Coach and Banana Republic.

20. Jane Aldridge, Sea of Shoes
Another blogging pioneer, the Dallas-based Aldridge started her site at age 15. Eight years later, she’s still at it, partnering with brands like Lovegold and Cartier on a regular basis.

Six tips to encourage your hair clients to come back

Tweet Campaign Crash Courses Academy (31)What you can do to encourage clients to come back so you meet your weekly minimum thresh hold.

 extracted from Getting Started in the Hair Extension Business by Diane Shawe

Your database has much more marketing potential than you probably realise. You can refer to it when doing promotions and it will act as a reminder system. I have always captured my client’s details so that I can send them special offers and guess what by creating a Whatsapp group you can reach them in the click of a button.

It is a way of keeping records of client’s visits with you. You will keep dates, services and products used or recommended customers’ goals and important dates. If a client rings for an appointment, but isn’t sure what to book for, you will have the answer by checking your well-kept records.  Also take a nice photo of your finished work, email it to the client it does not cost much and they can use it on their facebook.  Show them how good you made their hair look when they last visited.

When running competitions or conducting a survey, make sure to get the prospects’ details. Every time you get a new enquiry, complete a proper consultation form. When collecting details, always ask for name, address, phone number, e-mail address and birthday. It’s very useful for marketing afterwards. Get as much detail as you can.

The more you can find out about clients, the better you will be able to serve them. Make sure you inform the client that their information will not be sold or passed on to any other party and will remain confidential.

As an incentive for them to give you their details you could offer a gift voucher or discount coupon for each survey that is completed and returned.

Keep in regular contact with your customers by e-mail or by post. Don’t let them forget about you which they may do if you don’t keep reminding them about your business.

It’s important to refresh your database regularly. Any clients that haven’t been heard from in over six months could be given a courtesy call. Check everyone’s details and if you find that some customers have moved, remove them from the database.

You don’t want to waste money sending mail-shots to people who havemoved.

1.  Send reminders

Use your database as a reminder system. It is a good idea to send text messages as reminders to appointments.  Keep detailed records of each client’s product and service history, so that you know when they are due for an appointment and also, what type of service they are due for. It’s also wise to record what prices you have charged them.

Send your clients a reminder text message if they are overdue for an appointment. Tell them how long it’s been since they last had their hair done. Tell them that they are overdue and tell them what service their hair is due for. A cheap and easy way to keep them updated it by creating a whatapp group. So don’t forget to get their numbers.

When you write to them, advise them of any promotions you are offering. If you have any news like new products, new services or new staff, mention that as well.

2. Questionnaire questions

It is a good idea to consider sending out a questionnaire at least once a year to find out what you are doing wrong so that you can change it, or doing right so that you can improve or upgrade it.

 

Sometimes it’s a good idea to ask them to give answers with a rating, where you give them a box to tick. Also give them room to explain their answer.

 Here are a few examples of questions you could ask:

  • Was your last appointment carried out to your full expectation?

  • Was your last appointment carried out on time?

  • Were you happy with the technician who attended to you?

  • Were you made to feel important?

  • Did you receive a full consultation about your service?

  • Were you advised of suitable retail products for your hair?

  • Were you attended to immediately upon arriving?

  • Are there any services you would like to see improved?

  • Are there other services you would like to see provided?

You could add the following to quality check your products and services.

 Please rate the following as either: poor, average, good, very good, excellent.

  • overall customer service

  • hair extension appearance

  • hair extension cleanliness

  • staff appearance

  • staff attitude

  • friendliness of staff

  • quality of service

  • quality of products used

  • choice of retail products

  • value for money

3. Teach clients about hair maintenance

Get your clients to come in more often by telling them when to come back.

Tell them how often they should have their hair re tightened or for barbers you could look at intervals and suggest special allocated times for them.

Teach them how to look after their hair with retail products. Teach them about the benefits of the products, so that they feel the need to buy them.

Get them into the habit of booking you to do their hair for special occasions.

Sometimes clients just need a bit of nudging.

Provide a ‘frequently asked questions’ list

Present your clients with a well presented FAQ list. Do this at regular intervals, changing the look of the list and some of the questions each time. Offer some free advice and promote your services and products at the same time.

If you make a list of questions and answers, you can educate your clients about the latest styles, hair maintenance, retail products and the services you provide.  You could post it on your website.

Give any information that will help promote your business, making it as detailed as you like, but be careful not to bore the clients.

By asking the right questions you can plant ideas about services or products that the clients might not have thought of before.

When giving answers make them short and clear, but add a reason for each answer.

Always explain the benefits. If clients can see a benefit or extra value in doing or using something, they are more likely to take your advice. Anyone can tell them that a product is great, but they need to know what’s in it for them.

Remember your clients at Christmas time

At Christmas time send your customers a Christmas card. Thank them for their past custom and tell them how much you are looking forward to seeing them next year.

Some customers might expect you to close you studio around holiday time. Quote the days that you will be closed and also, mention any extra hours that the hair extension will be open.  If you are going away, tell them which of your staff can look after them in the meantime.

Christmas is a good time to also take some nice photos of your clients and either print them out or email it to them in the form of an online Christmas card that they could send to friends.

 4. Look ahead, book ahead

All clients should be asked if they would like to book their next appointment.

Tell them that by booking ahead, they can book their preferred day, time and technician. This might be more convenient for them, rather than having to wait for an appointment if their technician is booked out when they call for an appointment.

In the course of the conversation, find out if the client has any function or special occasion coming up. Ask if the client would like sprucing up for the occasion and if so, book the appointment before the client leaves the hair extension studio.

The client may be attending a function in a few months. This might give you a chance to book in a couple of appointments a bit closer to each other than usual so that the client’s hair is done just in time for the function. It’s more profitable to squeeze in an extra booking like this, than to let the client wait longer and only have one appointment.

 5. Provide loyalty cards

 One way of getting clients to keep coming back is to give them a free service every now and then. Give the clients a loyalty card each and explain how the concept works. For example, the loyalty card contains boxes that are stamped each time the client visits you. You could offer differing numbers depending on spend and after reaching a certain number the client receives a service to a specified value free.

Alternatively you could give free products with the cards or you could even give a gift certificate from another business that you have an alliance with.

6. Follow up

When clients have been to the hair extension studio for the first time, it’s good to call them up a few days later and ask if they are happy with their hair.

This is a way to show them that you value them as clients. They will be pleased that you made the effort.

If they’re not happy with their hair, it gives you a chance to offer to make

changes, so that you don’t lose them as clients.  If you find out that clients aren’t pleased with the hair extensions, you have the opportunity to change things, so that other clients aren’t affected by the same problems.

Any feedback is good feedback. Make sure to use the feedback to your advantage.