Category Archives: Hairloss

Celebs 5 most popular Hair Colours this Autumn


Jet Black

All-black everything can be daunting, the Kardashian have made it very popular however for a fresh take on this Autumn favorite, try warming up jet-black with ribbons of chestnut highlights. A few piecey, cool-toned strands like Olivia Munn’s look especially stellar on olive skin tones.

Dark Bronde

Already have a darker brownish-blond shade like Khloé Kardashian’s? Ask for a glaze. “With exposure to summer sun, your hair tends to fade and get bleached out.

Warm Copper

Consider this a marriage between dusty rose gold and deep auburn, with a warm metallic spark all its own.

On the brighter end of the copper spectrum sits Emma Roberts’ “cayenne red,” because of the rich red gleam that runs through the color. The shade contrasts her light complexion, and, maybe it’s just us, but it reminds us of autum. If you choose to go this route, it’s vital to keep the red hue from falling flat, so follow these celebrity-endorsed tips for keeping your red as vibrant as possible.

High-Contrast Roots

For anyone who dyes their hair, you understand how annoying root touch-ups can be. Instead of rushing into the salon, let your roots work in your favor this fall. By growing out your hair without a salon touch-up, it takes on a naturally lived-in appearance that celebrities like Hailey Baldwinhave proved to be fans of.

The best part of high-contrast roots, like Joan Smalls’ chic look  is that there’s pretty much zero upkeep. Simply let your roots grow in and your blond ends grow out, and sooner or later—boom—you’ve got yourself ombré hair.

Ombré

If you thought ombré was over, think again, because it’s still going strong. Get Jenna Dewan Tatum’s perfect two-tone look by going cool on top, warm on the bottom. Have your colorist add a caramel-color tone from midlengths to ends in order to soften a natural brunette base.

Sandy Beige

Great news for those of you who love ultra-blond highlights in the summertime: By adding some beige-toned streaks like Behati Prinsloo’s to your hair for fall, you’ll end up with incredibly beautiful dimension and richness. Keep the color lasting longer with a few of our favorite shine-inducing hair products.

For a different take on the shade, like Jordyn Woods’ here, aim for a sandy allover color that gradually deepens, just a touch, at the roots.

About Need a Hair Makeover

Are you tired of your hair style and sick of waiting for your hair to get to the length you want, sick of chemicals, sick of your unmanagable hair? sick of thin lack lustra hair?

Well we can help using Hair Extensions. So for some women this is a no-brainer.  With over 16 different hair extensions techniques there is bound to be one technique that can safely help achieve your hair goal in a short time.

So if you have short hair but want it long, straight hair but want it curly or the other way round, thin hair but want it thick, highlights without chemicals or just want some hair ,Well we have a amazingly fantastic deal to help you get started.

Free consultation
Free colour match
Free refreshments
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Free friendly smile

WhatsApp or message 07532 798395
Facebook.com/needahairmakeover

Download our latest  #hairextensions advice app from googleplay http://tinyurl.com/m36fkyc or book an appointment http://www.needahairmakeover.com.


Diva Celebs Hair Land of Extremely Long Hair Extensions Hots Up

Every Celebrity That Has Long-as-Hell Hair Right Now

Article by Diane Shawe Author
See how celebrities from Nicki Minaj to Kim Kardashian are all-out working the extra-long hair trend? Other stars are going X-treme long and adding inches with sweeps of butt-grazing hair.

So although short lobs were going strong with celebrities like Bella Hadid and Kylie Jenner cropping their cuts just a month or two ago the hair-toss boomerangs they now have access to has started trickling down to the ordinary guys on the street.

There’s long hair, and then there’s extra long hair. The former is the uninteresting look which is now considered average! The latter is a luxury reserved for one-name A-listers like Kim, Nicki, Rihanna, Ariana…the list goes on.

Nothing says “I’m rich and important” like stick-straight, shiny, or long bouncy wavy butt-length (or in Nicki’s case, ankle-length) strands– says Diane Shawe expert hair extensions consultant and author.

Just think of the amount of upkeep it requires, the price of extensions or custom wigs, and the sheer implausibility of doing regular-person, day to day activities with 32 inches of hair affixed to your head?

You need to be Somebody to pull it off–so it’s no wonder the divas of our time have taken to owning the look lately but, the look is out there on the streets now and some girls are even rocking Xtreme long braids to achieve that ultimate head turning attention.

So how can you achieve this look on the streets without spending thousands?

PONYTAILS

Pre made ponytails starting from £40- £120 depends on the length and density.

WIGS

High grade heat tolerant Wigs are the best because you can blow out the look to keep the locks looking shiny and in good condition. Prices vary but an investment from £70 – £300 and you can rock that look anytime throughout the year.

HAIR EXTENSIONS

Clip-ins for fun

Great but can be heavy and could come away easily.

Wefts for weaving

Great a little more secure best used on people who already have long hair.

Prices start from £250 – £700 for Brazilian virgin human hair 26 inches

For more information click here to download our android app

Selection of Celebs with extreme long hair extensions

Billie hadid

Rita Oramoo

Ariana Grande

Shay Mitchell

Gigi Hadid

Jessica Alba

Kylie Jenner

Kourtney Kardashian

Chrissy Teigen

Jourdan Dunn

Taraji P. Henson

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.appswiz.hairextensionsadvice&hl=enJulianne Hough

Why it is important to use gloves when dying hair or hair extensions

What is paraphenylenediamine and where is it found?

How can paraphenylenediamine cause skin irritation when dying hair or hair extensions and where is it found?


Article by Diane Shawe Monday M.Ed 

Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is a chemical substance that is widely used as a permanent hair dye. It may also been found in textile or fur dyes, dark coloured cosmetics, temporary tattoos, photographic developer and lithography plates, photocopying and printing inks, black rubber, oils, greases and gasoline.

People working with PPD such as hairdressers or hair extensions technicians may develop dermatitis on their hands; patch testing usually reveals hypersensitivity to PPD. Occupational allergy to PPD has been found in a milk tester whom through laboratory work was in frequent contact with PPD solution. Dermatitis on the hands and occasional spreading to the arms and upper chest occurred.


YouTube is the undisputed champion in free visual knowledge transfer. I have seen lots of hair technicians demonstrating how to dye hair and often they are not using gloves.

Unprocess virgin Hair Extensions


In 2015/6 alone nearly £15m worth of treated human hair – has been washed and sometimes dyed – was imported into the UK, according to Customs and Excise. 

It comes mainly from India, China and Europe. On top of that almost £10m worth of wigs,  false beards, eyebrows and eyelashes made from the stuff were also imported. 

Those in the trade estimate the hair extension industry alone is worth £60m in this country, although there are no official figures.

When it comes to our tresses, the rarest and most expensive is natural blonde hair, Des Tobin a professor of cell biology at Bradford University, who has studied hair and the trade.

“About 90% of the world’s population has dark brown hair,” he says. “It’s actually really hard to get natural, adult hair that is blonde. The rarity of hair colour will dictate the price. Blonde hair can cost up to three times as much as dark hair.”

Recently we have seen a flood of natural Virgin remy hair which is unprocessed enter the market place. It is a lot cheaper so an increase in home and salon hair bleaching and toning is on the rise.

PPD in Hair Dye and the importance of gloves

Millions are spent annually on home hair dyes, salon balayage and multi colour ombre colours. The use of PPD as a hair dye is popular because it is a permanent dye that gives a natural look. Hair can also be shampooed without becoming decoloured and perming to achieve waves or curls can be done without difficulty. 

PPD hair dyes usually come packaged as 2 bottles, one containing the PPD dye preparation and the other containing the developer or oxidizer. PPD is a colourless substance that requires oxygen for it to become coloured. It is this intermediate, partially oxidised state that may cause allergy in sensitive individuals. Fully oxidized PPD is not a sensitiser thus individuals with PPD allergy can wear wigs or fur coats dyed with PPD safely.

What are the reactions to PPD allergy?

Reaction caused by the use of hair dye in mild cases usually only involves dermatitis to the upper eyelids or the rims of the ears. In more severe cases, there may be marked reddening and swelling of the scalp and the face. The eyelids may completely close and the allergic contact dermatitis reaction may become widespread.

Severe allergy to PPD can result in contact urticaria and rarely, anaphylaxis. PPD has also been suspected of precipitating contact leukodermaand vitiligo in genetically predisposed individuals.

What should you do to avoid PPD allergy?


For the Technician


If you are a hairdresser or hair extensions technician, rule one when working with any chemical that could cause dermatitis is to wear gloves. I have seen many youtube demo videos were the technician is not wearing any gloves. 


For the Client


If your client have an allergy to PPD  you should avoid the use of all oxidation type hair dyes. These are usually recognised by coming in a 2-bottle preparation. If you have been informed by your client or you should have completed a client consultation form checking for allergy history (most clients won’t know what PPD is) to be safe perform a patch test or suggest a semi-permanent hair dyes which may be a suitable alternative but approximately 10% of individuals who are allergic to PPD also react to these; 


Patch testing


Patch testing to confirm sensitivity should be performed prior to their use. Metallic hair dyes and vegetable rinse hair dyes may be used but these do not provide permanent colouring. Some newer permanent and semipermanent hair dyes use para-toluenediamine sulfate (PTDS) instead of PPD. This is likely to be tolerated by about 50% of people who are allergic to PPD. Patch testing is recommended prior to use.

Related substances to PPD which may also cause an allergic reaction


Azo dyes: used in semi-permanent and temporary hair dyes, ballpoint pen inks, gasoline and diesel oil, and as colouring agent in foods and medications 
Benzocaine and procaine: these are local anaesthetics used by doctors and dentists

Sulfonamides, sulfones, sulfa drugs: 

PPD allergy may make you sensitive to the use of these drugs also, discuss with your doctor before changing or stopping your medication
Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA): this is used in sunscreens and creams that are readily available in over-the-counter preparations. You should only used sunscreens that are labeled ‘PABA-free’. Ask your pharmacist for suitable alternatives.

Para-aminosalicylic acid: used for tuberculosis

Alternative names for paraphenylenediaminePPD or PPDAPhenylenediamine basep


-Phenylenediamine4
-Phenylenediamine1,4
-Phenylenediamine4
-Benzenediamine1,4
-Benzenediaminepara
-Diaminobenzene (p-Diaminobenzene)para
-Aminoaniline (p-Aminoaniline)Orsin™Rodol™Ursol™ 


Please seek professional advice from you GPS or Chemist if unsure.


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