Category Archives: Management

10 Ways to Boost your Hair Extensions Business by Diane Shawe

Article by Diane Shawe Author: Extracts from Getting Started in the Hair Extensions Business

Sometimes you find things are going great and then the big slump takes a hold. How can you evaluate what you have done right and where you are going wrong?

Doing a SWOT analysis will give you a true picture of how your hair extension business could or should be running. It is essential to work out why some things are working in your business and why some are

SWOT stands for ‘strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats’. It is a well-known term in business and marketing. Performing a SWOT analysis is a very important part of running the business. It must be taken seriously

It is your own audit of your business no matter the size of it and should be done on a regular basis, at least annually. It’s not very complicated but could help keep you ahead of your competitors.

You may discover problems that you had no idea even existed. These can be addressed before they get out of hand. It will also highlight many assets, which could be utilised better, even opportunities, which could be taken advantage of.

The results of your SWOT analysis will be the basis for your marketing plans and decisions.

‘What they don’t tell you about getting started in the hair extension business’ summary from page 20 – 35 author Shawe D 2007

1) Form business alliances

Join up with other businesses to help each other build a bigger clientele.

Form an alliance with another business that has the same type of clientele as yours, for instance a business which involves beauty, nails, tanning, or fashion.

You can take this alliance as far as you like. You could set up shop together, or just refer clients to each other. You could do some advertising together and share the cost. Another idea is to hand out gift vouchers for each other. Each gift voucher could be for a free service.

It’s best if you both cater to clients who are at the same end of the market.

There’s not much point in marketing to people who simply can’t afford to come to your hair extension studio or pay for your services.
2. Choosing a Business

Choose a business where the people have the same business ethics as yours and a good database of clients.


3) Network

Throw the occasional cocktail party and invite the surrounding business owners, managers and employees of your choice. If you can build relationships with these people you may gain them as clients. Remember most men have girlfriends or wives and most women have other lady friends also.

They might also refer some of their customers and friends to you. Do this especially with the staff of beauty and fashion shops in your area. They are ideal people to get referrals from.
4) Get Quality Training

There are over 36 different hair extension techniques in the market place. If you really want to plan to be a success in this market, then you have to choose to become totally proficient in several techniques. There are many types of clients out there with varying hair problems, plan to be of service to you target market. Restricting yourself is restricting your potential income.


5) Be Classy (even if your working from home)

It’s best to set your hair extension studio up so that the right impact is made right from the moment the clients make an entrance or you make an entrance. Remember that the more professional the hair extension studio looks, the more you will be able to charge, as you will attract a more up market clientele. I always advise that the overall look must not out way the warmth and welcome of the studio. Clients like to feel relaxed with the staff and environment, not as if they are on show.
6) Flowers at reception or at your home always add a touch of class.

So does a smiling face, which helps to make each client’s, visit a welcoming visit right from the start. You can make the waiting area more impressive by including a great retail area, some hair extension brochures, and a book containing before and after photos. Provide some new, interesting magazines and hair books. Toss the old or torn ones out.
7) Always protect the clients clothing.

There should be a cupboard or rack for coats, or like some hair dressers have, a small dressing room for clients, who are given a gown to wear. This is a great idea as it removes the problem of high collars being in the way and clothes being ruined.


8) Get rid of shabby items.

Make sure there is a place for everything and enough storage space, so that the hair extension studio can be kept tidy. Get rid of the old wraps, used or shabby towels, and worn brushes. Never have dirty combs or tongs lying around. All of these things make a bad impression on clients.
9) No Carrier bags or damaged cases.

If you are mobile don’t turn up with carrier bags or a damaged beauty case. Make sure you are presentable and that your hair looks emaculate.
10) Don’t be afraid to change with the times.

If your hair extension studio starts to look outdated give it a facelift. Invest in the latest equipment. Make sure that the chairs not only look good, but also feel comfortable. If you are mobile make sure your equipment is up to date in line with your techniques.

The most valuable ebook for your hair extension business Click to order

What they don’t tell you Visit www.needahairmakeover.com to view a selection of 1 day courses.

Call us on 0121 318 2880 to discuss our courses we train in over 14 different techniques or if you would like to book an appointment to have your hair extensions done

Undercutting your Hair Extensions Competition


Extracted from Getting Started in the Hair Extension Business by Diane Shawe

If your hair extension studio is a real under-cutter, care will have to be taken to keep costs as low as realistic as possible.

Don’t be shy when it comes to taking money for your services. Charge for the value of the benefits that you offer.

You must put a value on your services; look at your type of clientele, hair extension location, experience of employees, your clients’ needs and, the prices of the competition.

Price is sometimes seen as a sign of quality and value. Price can attract like-minded customers. They think that because your prices are high, the technician in your hair extension studio must be good. If your prices are high, it is important to promote to the high paying customers, the value of your service.

There are a lot of competitors, so low prices alone, might not be enough to keep the low paying customers coming back. Clients who look for bargains are not only looking for low prices, but they want to get great results too.

You must determine how much value you can offer. To be of value to clients, you must know what the clients’ needs are. Understand what benefits they wish to receive, what pain they want to relieve.

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The benefits they want might be a quick service with no waiting, or it could be that they want an expert doing their hair. They might prefer certain products used on their hair, or to know that they can be squeezed in at short notice occasionally.

Their pain might be that they begrudge spending time on their hair, or that they loathe technicians who don’t listen to them. It might be that they just haven’t found the right retail products to use at home.

Profit margins will be low, so a lot of clients will have to go through the hair extension studio, just for you to be able to pay the overheads. It will most likely mean offering fewer services and probably, rushing clients through. Even the employees will have to be paid a low salary.

In some cases, this could mean that the employees are much less experienced than you may like. You really need to decide on what sort of employees you want in your hair extension studio. You will find that the best technicians won’t want to work in a cheap hair extensions studio. Not only would it hurt their reputations, but they wouldn’t work for a low salary.

Your clientele will most likely be bargain hunters who probably won’t spend on retail products either.

Charge by experience
If your employees have exceptional skills or experience, you can charge more. If you promote these benefits well, you’ll find that clients don’t mind paying extra. A lot of clients don’t mind paying for the name, or the prestige.

Some hair extension studios charge by the experience of the hair technician performing the service. As employees reach certain levels of experience, they charge more. This seems to work very well for them.

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Taking a look at food Fads and Trends by Diane Shawe

I dont often write about food, but when you think about it, it plays a major part in our daily life.

I researched and found some observations from the Compass Group UK & Ireland, the Food People who compile a list of the top 10 food trends we can expect to emerge or, in some cases, continue into next year.

Multi-cuisine restaurants

Serving up dishes that take inspiration from all sorts of exciting and international sources are coming to the fore at the same time as nano-specialists that pour all their energy into mastering single ingredients.

When you look at the world of food, you realise that food trends are really being driven by consumers and what they need and want.

The other point that’s important to consider is the difference between a trend and a fad, A fad is confined to one category, channel or geography and usually just lasts for one season or year.

A good way to spot trends that will stand the test of time is to identify the ones that have one or more wider social drivers, such as health and wellbeing, or seeking experiences that support them.”

BBQ 2.0
Different barbecue techniques inherited from around the world will become part of restaurant theatre, Consumers will continue to crave the charred and smoky flavours from a barbecue.

As we see more chefs and barbecue operators starting to think of the barbecue or fire as an incredibly versatile cooking method, rather than an institution confined by history we can expect this momentum to continue with alternatives
to meats, such as fish and game, vegetables, new cuisines and desserts from the barbecue.

Who’s doing it: Temper, London W1F

healthy-food

Global larder
As travel has become more affordable and technology ensures the world becomes better connected, the lines that divide regional fare have blurred.

Chefs and home cooks are growing, buying and cooking with ingredients more typical of exotic cuisines than with their own flare, forget about geographical barriers – flavour profiles from across the globe are being used in our kitchens, as consumers become more aware of the unusual flavour imparted by these world ingredients.

Who’s doing it: the Providores, London W1U

Multi-cuisine cooking
This is a food movement that is less about fusion and more about choice,

Quantity and quality are key, as influences and ingredients move from specific regional classics to global favourites, taking their seat at the world table.
Who’s doing it: Caravan, London N1C

Nano-specialism
This is almost the perfect counter-trend to multi-cuisine cooking, focusing as it does on expertise, excellence and the narrative.

“Now is the time to be a specialist in your field,” says Banks. “Make your food shine, showing it off to its best possible potential. These specialists are showcasing individual ingredients and creating surprising and delicious dishes with only one main ingredient.

“These nano-specialists are becoming masters of the humble avocado or bag of crisps, as boundaries are pushed and experimentation takes over.”

Who’s doing it: Yolk, London EC2M

Provenance
Consumers are more interested in where their food comes from than ever – from the breed to the farm and the farmer’s name. But why do they want so much information?

Gorgeous Group’s Bargh says: “In a world of consumer distrust, knowing the back story helps to create an element of trust and transparency between the consumer and the retailer, brand and chef, and gives consumers the ability to create a real emotional connection.”

Compass’s Davies agrees: “People seek honest stories they can trust in an uncertain world. It feels good to know who made your food or drink, where it comes from and how it was cared for.”
Who’s doing it: Lyles, London E1

Authenticity
Simon Parton, Compass Group UK & Ireland’s head of food and beverage innovation, says: “Authenticity is a delicate balance. At the very top level, it means total authenticity of the recipe and the ingredients. This is expensive, so to most of us authenticity means capturing the essence of the cuisine, the flavours, the key ingredients, the colours and smells; not breaking the rules by using the wrong meat, for instance.”
Who’s doing it: Hill & Szrok, London E8

Veg-centric cooking
Meat-free dining has become a lifestyle choice for today’s health-conscious and environmentally aware consumers and it’s one that they’re choosing to dip in and out of.

“Veg-centric cooking is a trend that’s been bubbling away for a while,” says Nick Vadis, culinary director at Compass Group UK & Ireland. “That’s why we’ve developed our new vegetarian Root Kitchen concept for the business. But the people asking for it are not necessarily vegetarian.”

Vadis describes this group as ‘flexitarian’, while the Food People refers to them as ‘reducetarians’.

“This isn’t about being perfect, it’s about moderation of our carnivorous side,” says Banks. “Reducing any processes that harm the planet and finding cleaner ways to live and eat is better for our bodies and better for the world.”
Who’s doing it: Root, Bristol

Waste not, want not
The arguments for reducing waste are so compelling, for both the planet (less waste to landfill; conservation of natural resources) and hospitality operators (reduced costs), that the real question should be why not?

So it’s little wonder that food businesses are becoming increasingly innovative when it comes to lowering the levels of waste they produce.

“Restaurants are promoting themselves as having ‘no food waste’, using not only nose-to-tail but also root-to-tip [of fruit and vegetable]. Never before has so much of every plant and animal been used,” says Banks.

“There are a few operators that are responding to the desire from consumers to live within a sustainable food ecosystem. And it is extremely difficult to do if it is done properly. To quote Doug McMaster from Silo: ‘I don’t have a bin in my kitchen.’ Just think about that for a moment. Nothing is thrown away – no food, no packaging, nothing. That would completely change how a kitchen operates. He admits it’s very difficult, but it does mean you get very creative.”
Who’s doing it: Silo, Brighton

Craft carbs
We can kiss goodbye to ‘plastic white bread’, says the Food People, as the craft of bread baking returns and a trend for artisan, flavoured and luxury loaves emerges.

Of course, craft carbs go well beyond bread, as Banks explains: “Forget about cheap and cheerful, carbs have taken on a luxurious edge, elevating their position from midweek staple to fine dining. Fresh, authentic pasta made with finely milled ancient grains, or bright, vibrant tagliatelle coloured with vegetables.”
Who’s doing it: Trullo, London N1

tacos

Food by occasion…
… rather than food by type because, says Bargh: “Consumers are choosing to eat according to their mood, rather than the nationality of the food.”

This means, for example, that diners are looking for dishes that can provide a kick-start to their day, rather than food that is typically associated with breakfast. Banks says this is a trend that is particularly prevalent in the health space, but from an operator’s perspective, it’s not necessarily an easy appetite to satisfy: “The challenge is getting consumers to understand and articulate what they want at a more functional level.”
Who’s doing it: Detox Kitchen, London (various locations)

Food on the go
The grab-and-go food trend is expected to evolve in 2018 and it’s an opportunity not to be missed by hospitality businesses. The market was valued at £20.1b in 2016, with robust consumer demand for quick and quality food leading to substantial growth and no signs of it slowing down.

“On-the-go is the buzzword driving this trend,” says Parton. “We are all busy people – the average lunch in the UK is only 34 minutes – so we insist on eating on the go. Research we conducted found the sandwich has remained the favoured lunchtime choice, chosen by 63% of the UK workforce. We’ve done a massive amount of work to make sure we’re leading the way in delicious and convenient food. ‘On the go’ must not mean we compromise on quality and enjoyment.”
Who’s doing it: Pret a Manger/Leon, various locations

Whilst I agreed with some of the findings I was not overly surprises. The UK is becoming one big cultural melting pot, but you would think the only place this is happening is London.

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Discrepancy in pay exists despite the proportion of black men with bachelor’s degrees increasing

Black male graduates in the UK earned £7,000 a year less from 2007 to 2017 than white males.
That’s according to a report by the Resolution Foundation, which highlighted that this discrepancy in pay exists despite the proportion of black men with bachelor’s degrees increasing 24 percentage points over the past two decades, compared to a 15 point increase for white men.

The think tank also revealed the average pay gap between white and Pakistani and Bangladeshi non-graduate men is more than £4 an hour.

So Is #Adult #Education Broken?

#DianeShaweAuthor explores the main failings in education for an economy—powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

What has happened?

How can we make this new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of earning? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an every changing economy. It is evident that computers can do that for us!

Will the current type of Adult Education keep you in Employment?

Diane Shawe’s latest publication ‘Is Adult Education Broken suggests that a 21st-century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

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More and more top fortune company’s are giving way to automation primarily to drive costs down, improve reliability, security and accuracy.

Diane believes that we need to make sure that the type of education supplied can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs.

Education has to become student-centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education by looking back in order to move constructively forward.

There has always been a great deal of lip service given to the idea of learning by doing, but not much has been done about it. Diane recommends John Dewey book, Democracy, and Education 1916.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adult-Education-Broken-Diane-Shawe-ebook/dp/B07BWBMGFM

A thought provoking read get your copy today

Why Hair, Beauty & Hair Extensions Salons should Update their S.W.O.T Report

SWOT your personality & management style could save your business.

Article by Diane Shawe Author

Changing trends, diverse client base and increasing competitors are all hallmarks of change. How easily do you adapt to change and when was the last time you looked at your salons Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threaths.

One of the hardest things you will ever have to approach is getting an overview of how people perceive you after running your business for over a year. It is often said that sometimes the business owner can be the biggest obstacle to their business developing and growth. It’s worth getting an honest appraisal about yourself from a staff or clients. I don’t recommend family or friends as we often behave differently with strangers.

You might not like what you hear and you should make it easy for them to tell you. But Just like you would want an honest reference about a person before you employ them, you should seek an honest appraisal of how you are perceived by others.

This may help you make some adjustments before you embark on new business development and growth and help you get the best out of yourself at the earliest stages.

Swot analysis pointers

Your SWOT analysis should be made up of a separate SWOT for each component of the business. You must really examine each segment, probing every detail.

Determine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats for:

• hair, beauty and hair extensions business sector in your region

• the services you provide

• staffing issues

• clients

• competition

• market

• current marketing strategy

The following are a few examples of areas to look at:

Hair, beauty and hair extension sector in your region

• direction headed

• management

•Hair, Beauty and hair extension ethics

• customer service

• goals

• sales targets

• profit margins

• resources

services you provide

• cost to produce each service

• quality of services

• range of services

• demand for services

• pricing

staffing issues

• demand

• staff training

• potential

• communication

• cost to employ

• rapport with clients

• expertise

• attitude

• your management style

• what are your business values

clients

• most profitable target market

• customer profile

• quality of existing clientele

• quantity of clients

• needs and wants

• buying motivations

• how potential customers could perceive you

competition

• number of competitors

• their strengths, weaknesses

• your strengths, weaknesses

• their target markets

market

• the larger economy and how your business fits in

• market trends

• legislation changes

• position in the economic cycle

current marketing strategy

• position of hair, beauty and hair extension products and services in the market

• market perception of hair extensions and hair enhancement products and services

• advertising methods and relationship to social media

• advertising cost

• sales strategies

• sales promotions

• retail display

• market perception of retail

Performing and updating your SWOT analysis will give you a true picture of how your Hair, Beauty & Hair Extensions business could or should be running. It is essential to work out why some things are working in your business and why some aren’t.

You may discover problems that you had no idea even existed. These can be addressed before they get out of hand. It will also highlight many assets, which could be utilised better, even opportunities, which could be taken advantage of.

Discover the staffs’ perceptions of the business. Don’t be afraid or get upset to hear their criticisms, use them wisely. Some of your staff could have ideas that if used, would make huge differences to the hair extension studio. Quite often it is the smallest changes that make the biggest impact

The results of your SWOT analysis will be the basis for your marketing plans and decisions.

Extracted from Getting Started in the Hair Extensions Business by Diane Shawe’s eBook available on Amazon right now at: https://www.amazon.com/Diane-Shawe/e/B0052WG8V

IQ scores are falling -It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people

IQ scores are falling and have been for decades, new study finds

Guest Blogger: Rory Smith, CNN

IQ scores have been steadily falling for the past few decades, and environmental factors are to blame, a new study says.

The research suggests that genes aren’t what’s driving the decline in IQ scores, according to the study, published Monday.
Norwegian researchers analysed the IQ scores of Norwegian men born between 1962 and 1

991 and found that scores increased by almost 3 percentage points each decade for those born between 1962 to 1975 — but then saw a steady decline among those born after 1975.

Similar studies in Denmark, Britain, France, the Netherlands, Finland and Estonia have demonstrated a similar downward trend in IQ scores, said Ole Rogeberg, a senior research fellow at the Ragnar Frisch Center for Economic Research in Norway and co-author of the new study.

“The causes in IQ increases over time and now the decline is due to environmental factors,” said Rogeburg, who believes the change is not due to genetics.
“It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people, to put it crudely. It’s something to do with the environment, because we’re seeing the same differences within families,” he said.

These environmental factors could include changes in the education system and media environment, nutrition, reading less and being online more, Rogeberg said.

The earlier rise in IQ scores follows the “Flynn effect,” a term for the long-term increase in intelligence levels that occurred during the 21st century, arguably the result of better access to education, according to Stuart Ritchie, a postdoctoral fellow in cognitive ageing at the University of Edinburgh whose research explores IQ scores and intelligence and who was not involved in the new study.

Researchers have long preferred to use genes to explain variations in intelligence over environmental factors. However, the new study turns this thinking on its head.

Intelligence is heritable, and for a long time, researchers assumed that people with high IQ scores would have kids who also scored above average. Moreover, it was thought that people with lower scores would have more kids than people with high IQ scores, which would contribute to a decline in IQ scores over time and a “dumbing down” of the general population, according to Rogeberg.

Anyone who has seen the film “Idiocracy” might already be familiar with these ideas. In the scientific community, the idea of unintelligent parents having more kids and dumbing-down the population is known as the dysgenic fertility theory, according to Ritchie.

The study looked at the IQ scores of brothers who were born in different years. Researchers found that, instead of being similar as suggested by a genetic explanation, IQ scores often differed significantly between the siblings.

“The main exciting finding isn’t that there was a decline in IQ,” Ritchie said. “The interesting thing about this paper is that they were able to show a difference in IQ scores within the same families.”

The study not only showed IQ variance between children the same parents, but because the authors had the IQ scores of various parents, it demonstrated that parents with higher IQs tended to have more kids, ruling out the dysgenic fertility theory as a driver of falling IQ scores and highlighting the role of environmental factors instead.

What specific environmental factors cause changes in intelligence remains relatively unexplored.

Access to education is currently the most conclusive factor explaining disparities in intelligence, according to Ritchie. In a separate study that has not been released, he and his colleagues looked at existing research in an effort to demonstrate that staying in school longer directly equates to higher IQ scores.

But more research is needed to better understand other environmental factors thought to be linked to intelligence. Robin Morris, a professor of psychology at Kings College in London who was not involved in Ritchie’s research, suggests that traditional measures of intelligence, such as the IQ test, might be outmoded in today’s fast-paced world of constant technological change.

Morris states that “we need to recognise that as time changes and people are exposed to different intellectual experiences, such as changes in the use of technology, for example social media, the way intelligence is expressed also changes. Educational methods need to adapt to such changes,” Morris said.

Diane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken” goes on to state in her publication that “No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

In her thought provoking book she explains that we are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge which increasingly is increasingly becoming automated. We are entering the new century with opportunity on our side with huge problems that require new thinking.

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning?

How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?

Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

Inside her publication she explores

: Failure to find a fomular to develop teachers convergent and divergent facilitatingskills

: failure to consider cultural relevance

: failure to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills

: failure to prepare students about taking personal responsibility

: failure to encourage international engagement

:failure to manage growth of academic misconduct

Download your copy today https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07BWBMGFM/

Finally a frightening statistic:

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world” Isaac Asimov

Why Having The Right People Around You Matters To An Entrepreneur

Starting and running a business can be very lonely and exposes you to bouts of isolation. When this happens the need to be loved, needed, and pampered is very strong and there is nothing wrong with that.

Ones self esteem can suffer and this can be compounded by historical experiences (childhood, family etc) and frustration and exhaustion when trying to lift your business of the ground and working a 12 hours day.

Being an ideas person, being creative and wanting recognition for that is achieved when the evidence is people buying your services or products.

The people you have surrounding you is very important, they have to be of a similar stock because they get it, they move into activities that support your dream and help you benefit from your hard work.

Many women are brilliant because most of them run several things at once if they are mums, wife, daughters, designer, marketeer, sales person, social media expert, bookeeper, packer and distributors and the list goes on.

The main point is to have total confidence in who you are, listen to tapes and watch video that continually empowers you. Mix with the pack that stimulates and motivates you and you them. When you live like this all who is to be in your life will gravitate towards you and give you joy and support.

You will easily be able to then identify anyone around you that does not naturally fit into your gang because they don’t naturally make you feel better, they add weight to your life and focus on distracting you.

But we are born with free will and you can use it to experience your life in what ever way YOU want.

The ultimate responsibility is your.

How My Teacher Almost Dashed My Dreams Of Writing

wear your pretty shoes well by diane shawe884346925..jpg

When I was 8 years old I remember my teacher Mr Lester ripping up my homework and accusing me of copying the story I wrote for my homework that week. I remember it was a story about being lost in the woods at night, I use to be afraid of the dark back then.

I cried and said I hadn’t copied it, he gave me detention on top of that and called me a liar.

I was so embarrassed and ashamed I never did well in English Literature again just to spite him I thought but really he had squashed my confidence.

16 books later all published on Amazon with my most recent which took 3 years to write and a healthy vibrant blog with over 35k followers which I have been nurturing since 2010

Do you think adults in position of influence realise what they can do to a child?

Never let negative people define who you are or what you want to become.

Coaching is also important and if you want to propel your vision coaching can help you stay laser focused with a strategic plan

Download your copy on #amazon today https://goo.gl/gm9t2U

Diane Shawe’s eBooks are available on Amazon right now at: https://www.amazon.com/Diane-Shawe/e/B0052WG8V6

Why Black men will be Disproportionately Devastated by Industries drive towards Automation

 Black men and disproportionate employment

Black male graduates in London and throughout the UK are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts, figures suggest. In 2016 there was an unemployment rate of 18% for black male graduates aged 16 to 24 in the capital.

According to the data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the rate for their white counterparts was 10%. A government spokesperson said the employment rate for ethnic minorities was “at a record high”. So if the graduates, the brightest and best are having such a hard time what about the lower skilled or unqualified black men?

But for now lets focus on London. More than 83,000 young men in London are from black and mixed black ethnic groups, making up about one in five of young men in the capital.

Research by the National Audit Office (NAO) has found that along with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women, black men consistently have the lowest employment rates in the UK.

BBC London contacted 50 of London 500 top graduate employers last year across the banking, accounting, medical, legal and retail sectors. Eleven were able to provide data relating to their employment of black men specifically. Those 11 organisations recruited 1,803 graduates in 2016. Of those, 30 were black men.

The NHS leadership academy, for trainee managers, was among those which did not recruit any among its intake of 112 graduates.

Larry Elliott Economics Editor for the Guardian headlined on 4th April 2018 that Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD he goes on to write:

The west’s leading economic thinktank has warned its members that they are failing to prepare workers for an automation revolution that will leave 66 million people at risk of being replaced by machines in the coming years.

A new report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the most vulnerable – one in seven workers on average across the 32 countries studied – were less likely to be receiving help than those whose jobs were more secure.

The OECD said 14% of jobs in developed countries were highly automatable, while a further 32% of jobs were likely to experience significant changes to the way they were carried out.

Low-skilled people and youth were among those most at risk, according to the report, with the jobs at highest risk tending to be in low-skill sectors such as food preparation, cleaning and labouring. Workers in fully automatable jobs were more than three times less likely to have participated in on-the-job training, over a 12-month period, than workers in non-automatable jobs. Those most at risk were also less likely to participate in formal education or distance learning.

In September 2017 Mr Lammy a Tottenham MP reviewed the BAME people in the criminal justice system and found that in the UK black people who make up just 3% of the UK population make up 12% of the people in prison at a cost to the tax payer of £309m each year.

Whilst the report highlighted failings on the part of police forces, courts and prisons, it was identified that other issues like one parenthood, school exclusions, low income and high unemployment disproportionately affect some ethnic minority groups and have been linked to higher levels of criminality.

Is Adult Education for Graduates BrokenDiane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken?’ states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat for all groups, but has always inexplicably affected the BAME groups. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”.

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Isaac Asimov quote sharpens our focus

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

A recently published book by #DianeShaweAuthor ‘Is #Adult #Education Broken’?  explores the main failings in the educational system for an economy powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. What are the lessons to be learnt?

Download a copy from #amazon today Claim you copy now

Here’s the Main Reasons Adult Education is Broken and I’ll Prove It To You

Is Adult Education Broken?

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (4)

Adult education has become undervalued in an overpriced educational infrastructure.

The people who need the most help are already systematically ripped off by greedy loan companies, NHS parking, having to pay charges for drawing out their own money from private ATM machines in poorer boroughs, pre-paid electric meter’s to name but a few.

The more you seem to need help the more you seem to have to pay.

Off course, the arguments are always about risk, but to compound on top of their needs, a premium, just to make sure the risk is compensated for is questionable indeed. But another kind of ripping off is taking place. ‘Free online education’ you may ask ‘why is this a rip-off people”?
I will answer this from my perspective initially and then make further arguments as to why we should be very concerned about this un-policed, unchallenged butchery of the values originally infused into our adult educational system.

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (2)So if you all but think Adult Education is Broken and all but given up, this book spills the beans on what has gone wrong, what questions need to be addressed and if certain issues are tackled by Government, then there’s Hope,

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into
          account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

So the big Question is – What has happened?

  • Why have these large institutions priced education out of some fundamental principles?
  • Why on the other spectrum are all these free courses flooded the market?
  • How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning?
  • How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with or without experience and not just for the youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (5)
“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

                                                  Isaac Asimov

 
Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area.  Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an every changing economy.

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those
                                     who can best manage change.”                       Darwin

Throughout the ages, every human society has experienced challenges adjusting to population growth, maintaining structural order and creating channels for future generations. How well a society prepares the next generation for survival is imperative for the society as a whole but we have stalled in this process.

There seems to be a range of systemic failures such as

: failure to find a formula to develop teachers convergent and divergent Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (3)facilitating skills
: failure to consider cultural relevance
: failure to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills
: failure to prepare about taking personal responsibility
: failure to provide adequate technology and supporting curriculum
: failure to encourage international engagement
: failure to manage growth of academic misconduct

Diane Shawe Author states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”

With the population dramatically aging and low-level jobs increasingly swallowed up by machinery, entrepreneurship will be a necessity for many, rather than a lifestyle choice for some.

SMEs are of course already leading this charge but in order to gear up for the future we need to start off by asking a serious question, defining criteria’s and examining trends, impact these trends will have and plan a way to jointly prepare current and future generations to be both employable and entrepreneurial.

We are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. And we are entering the new century with an opportunity on our side but huge problems that require new thinking.

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