Tag Archives: adult education

The Effects of Grade Inflation on Education

So what is Grade Inflation and what are the effects?

Article by Diane Shawe Author extracts from ‘Is Adult Education Broken’

Grade inflation is the tendency to award progressively higher academic grades for work that would have received lower grades in the past.

  • Grade inflation makes it more difficult to identify the best students, as more students are awarded the highest available grade.
  • Grade inflation is not uniform between schools. This places students in more stringently graded schools and departments at an unfair disadvantage.
  • Grade inflation is not uniform among disciplines.
  • Grade inflation makes it more difficult to compare students who took their exams at different times.

The effects of Compliance Professionals

The rise of the campus compliance professional as expert utilising the perfects means of
gaining media influence with their established position. Though the means of gaining influence
are common, their aims vary from political, economic, to personal. Thus the label of
compliance professional applies to diverse groups of people, including propagandists,
marketers, pollsters, salespeople and political advocates. It’s interesting to note that education is not really targeted

The effects of Grade Point Averages (GPA)

According to a study published in 2014, a one-point increase in high school GPA translated to
an 11.85-percent increase in annual earnings for men and a 13.77 percent annual earnings
increase for women. However, the higher percentage increase was not found to be enough
for women to catch up to men: women with a 4.0 high school GPA still made less, on average,
than men with a 2.5 GPA. We are now seeing evidence of this in unequal gender pay for the same job

College and post-college students often wonder how much weight their GPA carries in future
employment. The employer, company and industry play the largest factor in answering this question.

According to Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., senior vice president of human resources for IAC/Interactive Corp, a company with over 33,000 employees, an applicant’s GPA is the single best indicator of future success in job employment. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, since 2001 there has been an increase in employers looking at and making hiring decisions based on, a candidate’s GPA.

In addition, Job Outlook 2005 survey reported that 70 percent of employers looked at an applicant’s GPA, increasing to 75 percent in 2010. Those looking at and weighing in college GPA reported that their cut off was a GPA of 3.0 or lower (Morsch 2 CL 2007-2010)

GPA is not the only factor that determines future employment. Many employers look for other
pertinent characters such as leadership, teamwork, flexibility and attitude. They may also look at the reputation of the college attended and other work related experiences such as
internships. In a 2010 student survey for recruiters, 45 percent of the students who had
completed an internship had already received a job offer. Many of these jobs were within the
company that they interned for.

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Although GPA seems to be important in the hiring process, other variables may contribute to
the likelihood of getting hired. If a student’s GPA is below a 3.0 or what the employer is looking for, it is suggested to calculate your GPA for only the classes within your major for your resume.

The effects of Consumer Confusion

Confusion occurs when a consumer fails to correctly understand or interpret products and
services. (Turnbell 2002 -2003). This, in turn, leads to them making imperfect purchasing
decisions. This concept is important to marketeers because consumer confusion may result in reduced sales, reduced satisfaction with products and difficulty communicating effectively with the consumer. It is a widely studied and broad subject which is a part of Consumer behaviour and Decision making.

The effects of Choice overload, financial pressures

Choice overload (sometimes called over choice in the context of confusion) occurs when the
set of purchasing options becomes overwhelmingly large for a consumer. A good example is a wine in the UK where supermarkets may present over 1000 different products leaving the consumer with a difficult choice process. Whilst large assortments do have some positive
aspects (principally novelty and stimulation and optimal solutions) any assortment greater
than around 12-14 products leads to confusion and specifically transferring the ownership of
quality assurance to the consumer.

What this means in practice is reduced levels of satisfaction with purchases from large assortments as a consumer may be left with doubt that they have succeeded in finding the “best” product. Choice overload is growing with every large database of online free courses such as Moodle, University offering large choices of taster courses which can often be misinterpreted as real courses.

Taking it all in

By no stretch of the imagination have I scratched the surface of all the different methods of
reviewing standards, methodologies, global rankings and other factors that suggest the
system(s) is failing to adequately prepare students and adults who are still in our system and will be for another 30 years to adjust to rapidly changing technology.

How can educators,prepare individuals for entrance into the global marketplace?

This is done by reviewing potential hindrances and shortcomings, of which I am going to list in my opinion the most relevant ones so that educators around the world can better explore and devote their best and brightest to finding solutions to shape educational strategies with a proactive approach designed to improve overall outcomes for success.

Before I begin I quote a reference from Charles Darwin

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best
manage change.”

Throughout the ages, every human society has experienced challenges adjusting to population
growth, maintaining structural order and creating channels for future generations. How well a society prepares the next generation for survival is imperative for the society as a whole but we have stalled in this process because we seem to be accumulating a pool of adults (who were once the next generation) who appear to be helpless in this new found world of information and technology -The intangible and more important how to work with the tangible.

One critical element of preparation in the 21st century is the ability to engage all ages and
cultures beyond communal borders. At the centre of this struggle for growth and prosperity is education.

I will now explore some of the current educational strategies which are failing to prepare the current adult generation sufficiently enough to enter the global workforce and sustain their family, community and contribute to their countries economic prosperity.

How to avoid being Ripped of by Mobile Hair Extension Technicians.

Tina is classed as a vunerable person. After suffering many health issues including cancer, Tina wanted to attend a forthcoming wedding looking lovely and having hair like she use too.

She made contact with a mobile person who had been advertising for over 4 years on gumtree. (Now there is nothing wrong with gumtree it offer an effective service) She explained her problem and what she wanted. The technician said she could provide the service, quoted her several hundreds of pounds and said she would personally deliver and fit the bespoke wig the following week after requesting a £200 deposit.

The following week she turned up on the doorstep of her now client, put the wig on her head, added some glue collected several hundreds of pounds by bank transfer and requested she receive another £10 cash for a taxi to the train station.

The following week this clients head was on fire, she had an allergy reaction to the glue and nylon base and the wig kept falling off her head.

The technician failed to do a pre consultation, measure her head, find out about any allergies or even do a pre fitting.

So here are the things you should look out for prior to doing business with a mobile hair and beauty self employed person

A) Do they have insurance

Whether you are working from home or a commercial site you can get businesses insurance. Normally insurance companies want evidence of your qualifications and experience.

B) Do they have a certificate of Business registration

All businesses should register with their local authority who will do a site visit to see if you comply with health and safety. They seems thou a certificate of registration once thou comply.

C) Do they have a website or facebook page

Often they will display previous clients photos or reviews. Contact details and trading address.

D) Do they have references or reviews

Facebook, google or blogs will give you a window into what clients think of their services.

E) Do they have a letterhead or invoice

Apart from setting a good tone, contact details sms brand is clearly visible.

F) Do they have terms and condition of service and sales

This is important. It gives you am ideas of how they will deal with problem, guaranteed work and what you can expect from them.

G) What is there money back or put it right policy.

It is important to understand this and get it in writing, even a text message to your phone from there’s is evidence

Dont be afraid to ask. Your risk assessment will pay off

Needless to say we were there to help her with her hair goals and achieved the results she wanted.

Discrepancy in pay exists despite the proportion of black men with bachelor’s degrees increasing

Black male graduates in the UK earned £7,000 a year less from 2007 to 2017 than white males.
That’s according to a report by the Resolution Foundation, which highlighted that this discrepancy in pay exists despite the proportion of black men with bachelor’s degrees increasing 24 percentage points over the past two decades, compared to a 15 point increase for white men.

The think tank also revealed the average pay gap between white and Pakistani and Bangladeshi non-graduate men is more than £4 an hour.

So Is #Adult #Education Broken?

#DianeShaweAuthor explores the main failings in education for an economy—powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

What has happened?

How can we make this new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of earning? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an every changing economy. It is evident that computers can do that for us!

Will the current type of Adult Education keep you in Employment?

Diane Shawe’s latest publication ‘Is Adult Education Broken suggests that a 21st-century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

Download your copy from Amazon today

More and more top fortune company’s are giving way to automation primarily to drive costs down, improve reliability, security and accuracy.

Diane believes that we need to make sure that the type of education supplied can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs.

Education has to become student-centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education by looking back in order to move constructively forward.

There has always been a great deal of lip service given to the idea of learning by doing, but not much has been done about it. Diane recommends John Dewey book, Democracy, and Education 1916.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adult-Education-Broken-Diane-Shawe-ebook/dp/B07BWBMGFM

A thought provoking read get your copy today

IQ scores are falling -It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people

IQ scores are falling and have been for decades, new study finds

Guest Blogger: Rory Smith, CNN

IQ scores have been steadily falling for the past few decades, and environmental factors are to blame, a new study says.

The research suggests that genes aren’t what’s driving the decline in IQ scores, according to the study, published Monday.
Norwegian researchers analysed the IQ scores of Norwegian men born between 1962 and 1

991 and found that scores increased by almost 3 percentage points each decade for those born between 1962 to 1975 — but then saw a steady decline among those born after 1975.

Similar studies in Denmark, Britain, France, the Netherlands, Finland and Estonia have demonstrated a similar downward trend in IQ scores, said Ole Rogeberg, a senior research fellow at the Ragnar Frisch Center for Economic Research in Norway and co-author of the new study.

“The causes in IQ increases over time and now the decline is due to environmental factors,” said Rogeburg, who believes the change is not due to genetics.
“It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people, to put it crudely. It’s something to do with the environment, because we’re seeing the same differences within families,” he said.

These environmental factors could include changes in the education system and media environment, nutrition, reading less and being online more, Rogeberg said.

The earlier rise in IQ scores follows the “Flynn effect,” a term for the long-term increase in intelligence levels that occurred during the 21st century, arguably the result of better access to education, according to Stuart Ritchie, a postdoctoral fellow in cognitive ageing at the University of Edinburgh whose research explores IQ scores and intelligence and who was not involved in the new study.

Researchers have long preferred to use genes to explain variations in intelligence over environmental factors. However, the new study turns this thinking on its head.

Intelligence is heritable, and for a long time, researchers assumed that people with high IQ scores would have kids who also scored above average. Moreover, it was thought that people with lower scores would have more kids than people with high IQ scores, which would contribute to a decline in IQ scores over time and a “dumbing down” of the general population, according to Rogeberg.

Anyone who has seen the film “Idiocracy” might already be familiar with these ideas. In the scientific community, the idea of unintelligent parents having more kids and dumbing-down the population is known as the dysgenic fertility theory, according to Ritchie.

The study looked at the IQ scores of brothers who were born in different years. Researchers found that, instead of being similar as suggested by a genetic explanation, IQ scores often differed significantly between the siblings.

“The main exciting finding isn’t that there was a decline in IQ,” Ritchie said. “The interesting thing about this paper is that they were able to show a difference in IQ scores within the same families.”

The study not only showed IQ variance between children the same parents, but because the authors had the IQ scores of various parents, it demonstrated that parents with higher IQs tended to have more kids, ruling out the dysgenic fertility theory as a driver of falling IQ scores and highlighting the role of environmental factors instead.

What specific environmental factors cause changes in intelligence remains relatively unexplored.

Access to education is currently the most conclusive factor explaining disparities in intelligence, according to Ritchie. In a separate study that has not been released, he and his colleagues looked at existing research in an effort to demonstrate that staying in school longer directly equates to higher IQ scores.

But more research is needed to better understand other environmental factors thought to be linked to intelligence. Robin Morris, a professor of psychology at Kings College in London who was not involved in Ritchie’s research, suggests that traditional measures of intelligence, such as the IQ test, might be outmoded in today’s fast-paced world of constant technological change.

Morris states that “we need to recognise that as time changes and people are exposed to different intellectual experiences, such as changes in the use of technology, for example social media, the way intelligence is expressed also changes. Educational methods need to adapt to such changes,” Morris said.

Diane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken” goes on to state in her publication that “No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

In her thought provoking book she explains that we are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge which increasingly is increasingly becoming automated. We are entering the new century with opportunity on our side with huge problems that require new thinking.

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning?

How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?

Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

Inside her publication she explores

: Failure to find a fomular to develop teachers convergent and divergent facilitatingskills

: failure to consider cultural relevance

: failure to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills

: failure to prepare students about taking personal responsibility

: failure to encourage international engagement

:failure to manage growth of academic misconduct

Download your copy today https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07BWBMGFM/

Finally a frightening statistic:

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world” Isaac Asimov

Will the current type of Adult Education keep you in long-term Employment?

Diane Shawe’s latest publication ‘Is Adult Education Broken suggests that a 21st-century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

It is not enough to leave everything up to our governments or educational institutions. Every adult should read this book because the questions outline in this publication affects us all, our children and how we decide to educate them and ourselves.

More and more top fortune company’s are giving way to automation primarily to drive costs down, improve reliability, security and accuracy.

Download your copy today

More and more get rich online schemes pop up each day as people are desperate to secure income to meet their daily needs and even aspirations. Sadly most of these schemes only leverage saving out of peoples accounts or worse they get into debt to try and secure a better future.

Diane believes that we need to make sure that the type of education supplied can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs. Creating a new generation of ‘Entreployability’ Read ‘The new rules of engagement towards long term employability..by Diane Shawe

Education has to become student-centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education by looking back in order to move constructively forward.

Is #Adult #Education Broken? #DianeShaweAuthor explores the main failings in education for an economy—powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. A thought-provoking read.

Download your copy on #amazon today https://goo.gl/gm9t2U

Destiny’s Child reunited and you won’t believe what they looked like!

Destiny’s Child reunited Saturday night for a performance at the Stellar Gospel Music Awards!

Yes, yes, yes: Beyoncé and Kelly Rowland joined former groupmate Michelle Williams at the Las Vegas event to sing Michelle’s song “Say Yes.” Awesome in and of itself, but the trio made it even better by dressing in their signature “same but different” outfits, with variations of white jackets and jeans.

This was the first time the ladies performed together since 2012, when they joined Beyoncé for a medley of “Bootylicious,” “Independent Women Part 1” and “Single Ladies” during Bey’s Super Bowl halftime show.

Is Adult Education Broken away from its Historical Purpose?

The historical purpose of education

First let me quote Jane Stanford of Standford University

“with a ‘spirit of equality’, one of my goals for the university is to resist the tendency and the stratification of society, by keeping open an avenue whereby the deserving and exceptional may rise through their own efforts from the lowest to the highest stations in life”.

According to various hypothesis and statements, the first and foremost purpose of education is to educate and give everyone equal opportunity as a means to succeed in life. Education is a way of igniting and enlightening the thought of an individual.

It should help learners to discriminate between knowledge and ignorance, help to create a spark and create the sense of realisation with logic and a way to reason why the other things are illogical.
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The purpose of vocational education

Every man must have a vocation – a trade, a business, or a profession – (if they are able too) in order to earn his livelihood so that they can support themselves, their family and people who cannot help themselves in our society. There are institutions for imparting various types of specialised training to help people qualify for this. The specialist is in demand everywhere, – in the office as well as in factories, in educational institutions and governments.

The Interlinkages between Technology and the economy

Innovation is pushing ahead at warp speed. We are certainly living through one of the most exciting periods in human history. The pace of change is so fast that even the technology of five years ago seems prehistoric.

Those of you who are students probably do not even remember a time when phones were not smart when cameras contained film when texts meant school books, and when wireless was a word used for old-fashioned radio! In view of this whilst conducting my mini research for this paper, I began to wonder how some of the following statements and themes became interwoven into the core of education and who started this process?

So let’s take a look at some of these themes and schemes, like me I think you will begin to wonder what happened to simply teaching someone something properly.

Extracts from the latest book by Diane Shawe – Is Adult Education Broken

Why Black men will be Disproportionately Devastated by Industries drive towards Automation

 Black men and disproportionate employment

Black male graduates in London and throughout the UK are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts, figures suggest. In 2016 there was an unemployment rate of 18% for black male graduates aged 16 to 24 in the capital.

According to the data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the rate for their white counterparts was 10%. A government spokesperson said the employment rate for ethnic minorities was “at a record high”. So if the graduates, the brightest and best are having such a hard time what about the lower skilled or unqualified black men?

But for now lets focus on London. More than 83,000 young men in London are from black and mixed black ethnic groups, making up about one in five of young men in the capital.

Research by the National Audit Office (NAO) has found that along with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women, black men consistently have the lowest employment rates in the UK.

BBC London contacted 50 of London 500 top graduate employers last year across the banking, accounting, medical, legal and retail sectors. Eleven were able to provide data relating to their employment of black men specifically. Those 11 organisations recruited 1,803 graduates in 2016. Of those, 30 were black men.

The NHS leadership academy, for trainee managers, was among those which did not recruit any among its intake of 112 graduates.

Larry Elliott Economics Editor for the Guardian headlined on 4th April 2018 that Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD he goes on to write:

The west’s leading economic thinktank has warned its members that they are failing to prepare workers for an automation revolution that will leave 66 million people at risk of being replaced by machines in the coming years.

A new report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the most vulnerable – one in seven workers on average across the 32 countries studied – were less likely to be receiving help than those whose jobs were more secure.

The OECD said 14% of jobs in developed countries were highly automatable, while a further 32% of jobs were likely to experience significant changes to the way they were carried out.

Low-skilled people and youth were among those most at risk, according to the report, with the jobs at highest risk tending to be in low-skill sectors such as food preparation, cleaning and labouring. Workers in fully automatable jobs were more than three times less likely to have participated in on-the-job training, over a 12-month period, than workers in non-automatable jobs. Those most at risk were also less likely to participate in formal education or distance learning.

In September 2017 Mr Lammy a Tottenham MP reviewed the BAME people in the criminal justice system and found that in the UK black people who make up just 3% of the UK population make up 12% of the people in prison at a cost to the tax payer of £309m each year.

Whilst the report highlighted failings on the part of police forces, courts and prisons, it was identified that other issues like one parenthood, school exclusions, low income and high unemployment disproportionately affect some ethnic minority groups and have been linked to higher levels of criminality.

Is Adult Education for Graduates BrokenDiane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken?’ states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat for all groups, but has always inexplicably affected the BAME groups. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”.

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Isaac Asimov quote sharpens our focus

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

A recently published book by #DianeShaweAuthor ‘Is #Adult #Education Broken’?  explores the main failings in the educational system for an economy powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. What are the lessons to be learnt?

Download a copy from #amazon today Claim you copy now

Download your free report on Strategies for Modernising Corporate Elearning by Diane Shawe

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on learning outcome cover by diane shawe

Does managing change manangement change anything

order your home study manualIt would seem that the world is changing fast, but has it been any slower than it was before?  Technology has helped to give the perception of  speed.  Sometimes we can feel out of control as things around us shift an often the ground from under our feet tremble with change.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

Responding to today’s kind of changes requires a new set of skills. Different levels of understanding, self leadership and governance.

What are the seven key areas one needs to consider and build into a Change management programme to aid collective understanding and collaborative progress?

Defining Change?

  • Why organisations or people fail?
  • What are various types of change?
  • What are various phases of growth?
  • What are major established theories on change management and how do they compare with each other?
  • What is the difference between leading and managing?

How Change Affects People

  • How do people respond to change?
  • What goes through people’s mind when they are confronted with change in different stages?
  • How ideas spread and what does this mean for change management?

How Organisational Change Works

  • What are the 8 stages of change and what should you consider in each stage to maximise the likelihood of success?
  • What are the principles of effective change?
  • What are the common problems when managing changes that if neglected can seriously impact the change process?

Managing Resistance

  • Why people resist change?
  • How can you deal with this resistance?
  • What are the techniques available to persuade people on change?
  • How can you engage stakeholders considering their power and interest?

How to Manage Change

  • What are the critical three components of a change management programme?
  • What tools can you use to manage and monitor employee skills and identify skill gaps?
  • How to develop employee skill profile?
  • What are various options in filling these skill gaps and what are each methods advantages and disadvantages?

Mentoring, Coaching and Motivating

  • How critical is motivation in the context of change management?
  • What is Skill/Will Matrix and how can you use it for coaching and managing change?
  • What is mentoring, what is coaching and what is the difference between them?
  • How can you use the GROW model to provide effective coaching?

Management Tools

  • What are the tools used for brainstorming ideas on change and structuring your plans and activities?
  • What tools can you use to identify what works for change and what works against it?
  • What tools can you use to monitor the scope of change and make sure that your plans are consistent and are applied at the right level?

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