Tag Archives: automation

IQ scores are falling -It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people

IQ scores are falling and have been for decades, new study finds

Guest Blogger: Rory Smith, CNN

IQ scores have been steadily falling for the past few decades, and environmental factors are to blame, a new study says.

The research suggests that genes aren’t what’s driving the decline in IQ scores, according to the study, published Monday.
Norwegian researchers analysed the IQ scores of Norwegian men born between 1962 and 1

991 and found that scores increased by almost 3 percentage points each decade for those born between 1962 to 1975 — but then saw a steady decline among those born after 1975.

Similar studies in Denmark, Britain, France, the Netherlands, Finland and Estonia have demonstrated a similar downward trend in IQ scores, said Ole Rogeberg, a senior research fellow at the Ragnar Frisch Center for Economic Research in Norway and co-author of the new study.

“The causes in IQ increases over time and now the decline is due to environmental factors,” said Rogeburg, who believes the change is not due to genetics.
“It’s not that dumb people are having more kids than smart people, to put it crudely. It’s something to do with the environment, because we’re seeing the same differences within families,” he said.

These environmental factors could include changes in the education system and media environment, nutrition, reading less and being online more, Rogeberg said.

The earlier rise in IQ scores follows the “Flynn effect,” a term for the long-term increase in intelligence levels that occurred during the 21st century, arguably the result of better access to education, according to Stuart Ritchie, a postdoctoral fellow in cognitive ageing at the University of Edinburgh whose research explores IQ scores and intelligence and who was not involved in the new study.

Researchers have long preferred to use genes to explain variations in intelligence over environmental factors. However, the new study turns this thinking on its head.

Intelligence is heritable, and for a long time, researchers assumed that people with high IQ scores would have kids who also scored above average. Moreover, it was thought that people with lower scores would have more kids than people with high IQ scores, which would contribute to a decline in IQ scores over time and a “dumbing down” of the general population, according to Rogeberg.

Anyone who has seen the film “Idiocracy” might already be familiar with these ideas. In the scientific community, the idea of unintelligent parents having more kids and dumbing-down the population is known as the dysgenic fertility theory, according to Ritchie.

The study looked at the IQ scores of brothers who were born in different years. Researchers found that, instead of being similar as suggested by a genetic explanation, IQ scores often differed significantly between the siblings.

“The main exciting finding isn’t that there was a decline in IQ,” Ritchie said. “The interesting thing about this paper is that they were able to show a difference in IQ scores within the same families.”

The study not only showed IQ variance between children the same parents, but because the authors had the IQ scores of various parents, it demonstrated that parents with higher IQs tended to have more kids, ruling out the dysgenic fertility theory as a driver of falling IQ scores and highlighting the role of environmental factors instead.

What specific environmental factors cause changes in intelligence remains relatively unexplored.

Access to education is currently the most conclusive factor explaining disparities in intelligence, according to Ritchie. In a separate study that has not been released, he and his colleagues looked at existing research in an effort to demonstrate that staying in school longer directly equates to higher IQ scores.

But more research is needed to better understand other environmental factors thought to be linked to intelligence. Robin Morris, a professor of psychology at Kings College in London who was not involved in Ritchie’s research, suggests that traditional measures of intelligence, such as the IQ test, might be outmoded in today’s fast-paced world of constant technological change.

Morris states that “we need to recognise that as time changes and people are exposed to different intellectual experiences, such as changes in the use of technology, for example social media, the way intelligence is expressed also changes. Educational methods need to adapt to such changes,” Morris said.

Diane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken” goes on to state in her publication that “No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

In her thought provoking book she explains that we are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge which increasingly is increasingly becoming automated. We are entering the new century with opportunity on our side with huge problems that require new thinking.

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning?

How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?

Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

Inside her publication she explores

: Failure to find a fomular to develop teachers convergent and divergent facilitatingskills

: failure to consider cultural relevance

: failure to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills

: failure to prepare students about taking personal responsibility

: failure to encourage international engagement

:failure to manage growth of academic misconduct

Download your copy today https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07BWBMGFM/

Finally a frightening statistic:

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world” Isaac Asimov

Will the current type of Adult Education keep you in long-term Employment?

Diane Shawe’s latest publication ‘Is Adult Education Broken suggests that a 21st-century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

It is not enough to leave everything up to our governments or educational institutions. Every adult should read this book because the questions outline in this publication affects us all, our children and how we decide to educate them and ourselves.

More and more top fortune company’s are giving way to automation primarily to drive costs down, improve reliability, security and accuracy.

Download your copy today

More and more get rich online schemes pop up each day as people are desperate to secure income to meet their daily needs and even aspirations. Sadly most of these schemes only leverage saving out of peoples accounts or worse they get into debt to try and secure a better future.

Diane believes that we need to make sure that the type of education supplied can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs. Creating a new generation of ‘Entreployability’ Read ‘The new rules of engagement towards long term employability..by Diane Shawe

Education has to become student-centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education by looking back in order to move constructively forward.

Is #Adult #Education Broken? #DianeShaweAuthor explores the main failings in education for an economy—powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. A thought-provoking read.

Download your copy on #amazon today https://goo.gl/gm9t2U

Why Black men will be Disproportionately Devastated by Industries drive towards Automation

 Black men and disproportionate employment

Black male graduates in London and throughout the UK are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts, figures suggest. In 2016 there was an unemployment rate of 18% for black male graduates aged 16 to 24 in the capital.

According to the data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the rate for their white counterparts was 10%. A government spokesperson said the employment rate for ethnic minorities was “at a record high”. So if the graduates, the brightest and best are having such a hard time what about the lower skilled or unqualified black men?

But for now lets focus on London. More than 83,000 young men in London are from black and mixed black ethnic groups, making up about one in five of young men in the capital.

Research by the National Audit Office (NAO) has found that along with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women, black men consistently have the lowest employment rates in the UK.

BBC London contacted 50 of London 500 top graduate employers last year across the banking, accounting, medical, legal and retail sectors. Eleven were able to provide data relating to their employment of black men specifically. Those 11 organisations recruited 1,803 graduates in 2016. Of those, 30 were black men.

The NHS leadership academy, for trainee managers, was among those which did not recruit any among its intake of 112 graduates.

Larry Elliott Economics Editor for the Guardian headlined on 4th April 2018 that Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD he goes on to write:

The west’s leading economic thinktank has warned its members that they are failing to prepare workers for an automation revolution that will leave 66 million people at risk of being replaced by machines in the coming years.

A new report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the most vulnerable – one in seven workers on average across the 32 countries studied – were less likely to be receiving help than those whose jobs were more secure.

The OECD said 14% of jobs in developed countries were highly automatable, while a further 32% of jobs were likely to experience significant changes to the way they were carried out.

Low-skilled people and youth were among those most at risk, according to the report, with the jobs at highest risk tending to be in low-skill sectors such as food preparation, cleaning and labouring. Workers in fully automatable jobs were more than three times less likely to have participated in on-the-job training, over a 12-month period, than workers in non-automatable jobs. Those most at risk were also less likely to participate in formal education or distance learning.

In September 2017 Mr Lammy a Tottenham MP reviewed the BAME people in the criminal justice system and found that in the UK black people who make up just 3% of the UK population make up 12% of the people in prison at a cost to the tax payer of £309m each year.

Whilst the report highlighted failings on the part of police forces, courts and prisons, it was identified that other issues like one parenthood, school exclusions, low income and high unemployment disproportionately affect some ethnic minority groups and have been linked to higher levels of criminality.

Is Adult Education for Graduates BrokenDiane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken?’ states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat for all groups, but has always inexplicably affected the BAME groups. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”.

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Isaac Asimov quote sharpens our focus

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

A recently published book by #DianeShaweAuthor ‘Is #Adult #Education Broken’?  explores the main failings in the educational system for an economy powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. What are the lessons to be learnt?

Download a copy from #amazon today Claim you copy now