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Outsourcing your knowledge

Albert EinsteinWhy knowing less helps you to do more.

Diane Shawe M.Ed. 

When you think about the power of your brain and how we learn, memorise and recall all those facts, it can get very confusing. Having taught for nearly 25 years and trained some of the brightest professionals over last 10 years, I believe that knowledge is divided in two distinct areas. We can either know about a subject ourselves or we know where we can retrieve information on that subject. The massive amount of information available online has opened an infinite library of easily and quickly retrievable information with simple search engines. I like to think of it as an organic external hard drive, an outsourced memory we can plug in at any time. Some have argued that the internet dilutes the most traditional kind of knowledge: knowing a subject ourselves. They argue that in some way it makes our brains less efficient, diminishing our intelligence and destroying our inner hard drives and memory.

You may remember (if you are of a certain age) that when you were young, you knew by heart the phone number of your closest friends. Since the introduction of digital directories on smartphones there is no longer any reason to memorise numbers by heart.   On the other hand, how many hundreds more contacts do you have now compared to then thanks to the digital directories? In reality, how much more connected are you? The real deal of the information age is not that it allows us to know more, but that it allows us to know less in terms of depth of what we know, as mentioned by David Brooks, a New York Times columnist, in his famous 2006 NY Times article[1] The Outsourced Brain.

neuroscience brain“Memory? I’ve externalised it.” He said, “I am one of those baby boomers who are making this the “It’s on the Tip of My Tongue Decade.” But now I no longer need to have a memory, for I have Google, Yahoo and Wikipedia. Now if I need to know some fact about the world, I tap a few keys and enjoy the vast resource of the external mind.”

I think the positive side of this is that we are free to expand our awareness of subjects we did not have space, or availability, to explore before. Our memory now has a different function: it is a digital index that remembers the existence of a subject and what are the best leads to find information on that subject. I too had thought that the magic of the information age was that it allowed us to know more facts. Then I realised that the magic of the information age is that it allows us to know less.

It provides us with external cognitive servants, silicon memory systems if you will, with collaborative online filters, consumer preference algorithms and networked knowledge. We thus can give these servants the massive raw data and liberate ourselves to think, explore and be creative. You can use your brain to learn new skills, the soft skills that are the true measure of success.

Your outsourced memory (the internet, the cloud and more) allows you to be aware of the existence of information you would never have come across before when you were limited to what your inner memory could hold. It allows you to increase the quantity (and thus the quality) of the information that you can process because you do not always have to worry about memorising every single detail of it. It allows you to use more brain power in linking concepts and applying them rather than remembering them. It empowers you to think and process information faster because your brain has the space to hold links to so much different information, and in doing so it expands your subjective time. Back in the analogue era, the difference between a deep brain and a shallow brain was the availability of information and the choice of whether to take in that information or not came second.

As an educationalist and technophile, combined with my outsourced memory I have the capacity to think deeper. Now that (nearly) everything is available, the power is back to you: it is up to you to take responsibility of what content goes into your mind and how you use your outsourced memory.

Now you have begun to outsource your brain and now have room to do something rather special with your neo-cortex. Enjoy.

 

Chunking information as a learning strategy: Micro Learning by Diane Shawe

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

One of my educational heroes is George A. Miller[1], a Princeton professor who died a few years ago. Miller is considered one of the greats of twentieth-century psychology. I often quote Miller’s law (for those who have heard me speak it is about a toaster that talks) and am struck by his effect on modern learning. At AVPT Short Courses ltd, we are proud that we can deliver very high quality online learning in days rather than years.

The courses are accessible by using tablets, ipads, smart phones and laptops and works on the principle of chunking up material into bite size micro content.  This aide’s memory, improves recall and the  ability to learn rapidly. So what is the science of chunking?

‘Chunking’ refers to organising or grouping separate pieces of information together. When information is ‘chunked’ into groups, you can remember the information easier by remembering the groups as opposed to each piece of information separately. The types of groups can also act as a cue to help you remember what is in each group. Chunking, in psychology, is a phenomenon whereby individuals group responses when performing a memory task. Tests where individuals can demonstrate “chunking” commonly include serial and free recall tasks. All three tasks require the individual to reproduce items that he or she had previously been instructed to study.

There are several ways to chunk information. Chunking techniques include grouping, finding patterns, and organising. The technique you use to chunk will depend on the information you are chunking. Sometimes more than one technique will be possible but with some practice and insight it will be possible to determine which technique will work best for you.

You can organise information into groups arbitrarily. For example if you have to remember a 10 digit number you can group it into pairs of numbers and remember 5 two digit numbers.

Another way to chunk information is by finding patterns in the information. When you find a pattern in information you just need to remember the pattern rather than a list of separate pieces of information. For example, if you have to remember the letter sequence ADGJMPSVY you may notice that these letters are just every third letter of the alphabet. So instead of remembering each individual letter, you can just remember the pattern used to find these letters.

Another chunking technique involves organising the information based on its meaning. For example, let’s say you have to memorise the age of everyone in a group of people. You can chunk the information by organising people by their age, then, for each age group, remember the people that belong to that group.

Chunking information can also help overcome some of the limitations of short term memory. We can generally only have 7 plus or minus 2 things in our short term memory at a time. However, by chunking information we can remember more. For example, if you have to commit a list of 11 numbers to your short term memory you likely won’t be able to. However, by grouping the numbers into chunks, you will greatly increase your chances of doing it.

The word ‘’chunking’’ is from a 1956 paper by my hero George Miller, The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information[2]. At a time when information theory was beginning to be applied in psychology, Miller observed that some human cognitive tasks fit the model of a “channel capacity,” characterised by a roughly constant capacity in bits, but short-term memory did not. A variety of studies could be summarised by saying that short-term memory had a capacity of about “seven plus-or-minus two” chunks.

Miller wrote that “With binary items the span is about nine and, although it drops to about five with monosyllabic English words, the difference is far less than the hypothesis of constant information would require. The span of immediate memory seems to be almost independent of the number of bits per chunk, at least over the range that has been examined to date.” Miller acknowledged that “we are not very definite about what constitutes a chunk of information.” Miller noted that according to this theory, it should be possible to effectively increase short-term memory for low-information-content items by mentally recoding them into a smaller number of high-information-content items. “It is a little dramatic to watch a person get 40 binary digits in a row and then repeat them back without error. However, if you think of this merely as a mnemonic trick for extending the memory span, you will miss the more important point that is implicit in nearly all such mnemonic devices. The point is that recoding is an extremely powerful weapon for increasing the amount of information that we can deal with.”

Using this as a basis, AVPT Short courses is committed to micro content and the chunking methodology to take out the traditional rote learning styles and avoiding large tracts of materials, making them more accessible and improving learning results. As a result of Miller’s work we can justifiably claim that achieve learning in days, not years. Thanks George!


[1] George Armitage Miller  died o July 22, 2012. He was one of the founders of cognitive psychology.  He also made seminal contributions to psycholinguistics and cognitive science in general. He authored several books and directed the development of WordNet, an online word-linkage database usable by computer programs. He authored the paper, “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two,” which experimentally discovered an average limit of seven for human short-term memory capacity.

[2] Miller, G.A. (1956), The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information. Psychological Review, 63, 81-97.

Get qualified whist on the move

Get qualified whist on the move

Where does the hair come from for Hair Extensions? by Diane Shawe

where does hair extensions come from by diane shaweDiane Shawe Author of “How Hair Extensions are Sourced, Treated and Graded” states that the first question all new customers ask is “where did the hair come from”?

They want to know about the geography and even history of the hair and so should you. In her book she covers this question by explaining the characteristics of each variety and summarises the pros and cons.

For instance dealing with the different hair origins.

Get your copy today from amazon.co.uk

Get your copy today from amazon.co.uk

· Origin: China, Eastern Europe, Russia and India

· Grade: Virgin, Cuticle, Non-Cuticle, Processed, Single Drawn, Double Drawn, Remy and Non-Remy

· Type: Caucasian, Asian

Diane’s book goes on to explain in some detail the differences, here we summarise the pros and cons from different regions.

Chinese Hair (Aka Asian Hair): A thick fibre that is naturally straight and dark brown to black in colour.

Advantages: High Quantity, Durability and Low Cost. It is the strongest human hair and is able to withstand multiple chemical and mechanical processes.

Disadvantages: Chinese hair requires extensive chemical processing to output hair that simulates European texture, colour and body. The majority of the hair is collected and processed as double drawn.

Indian Hair (aka Asian Hair, Italian Hair): A variety of fibre types from fine and straight, medium thick with body wave and curly to thick coarse hair. “Italian hair” is actually Indian hair that has been processed in Italy or Spain and then sold at premium prices.

Advantages: High Quantity, Good Quality, Variety and Low Manufacturing Cost. Indian hair is popular to use for custom made hairpieces because it can be made to resemble European hair. When not cuticle correct (non-remy) hair requires heavy-duty chemicals to remove cuticle layers. It is still at a high risk for severe tangling problems.

Disadvantages: Low Quality and Higher Retail Cost. Indian hair still requires quite a lot of chemical processing to make it appear as European hair. To reduce time and materials, many manufacturers choose to work with non-remy Indian hair that results in a poorer quality and most exporters handle the hair badly.

European Hair

(Aka Russian Hair, Caucasian Hair): A fine to medium density fibre that is naturally straight to slight wave and available in a variety of natural colours, most commonly dark blonds to medium browns. The Virgin colours will often be streaked with lighter shades or the ends will be much lighter than the roots due to weathering.

Advantages: High Quality. True Caucasian hair, whether originating from Russia, Eastern Europe or even the United States, is the best quality for the European and American market.

Disadvantages: Low Quantity and quantity and High Cost. It has always been an availability problem and is becoming more difficult to source lengths longer than 15 inches and of a good quality.

For more information about Diane’s extensive work on hair loss and consultancy, please see her website

For a copy of her book you can visit Amazon and download the full version or a sample “How Hair Extensions are Sourced, Treated and Graded”

Getting you qualified in the Hair Extension Sector

Getting you qualified in the Hair Extension Sector

 

Managing Pressure and Maintaining work balance

How to manage pressure at work 1 day course

When things are extremely busy at work and you have your hands full with many tasks and dealing with difficult people, having skills you can draw on are essential for peace of mind and growth. This one-day course will help participants understand the causes and costs of workplace pressure, the benefits of creating balance, and how to identify pressure points. They will also learn how to apply emotional intelligence, increase optimism and resilience, and develop strategies for getting ahead.

This one-day workshop will help participants learn how to:

  • o   Apply a direct understanding of pressure points and their costs and payoffs
  • o   Speak in terms related to emotional intelligence, optimism, and resilience
  • o   Create a personalized toolkit for managing stressors and anger
  • o   Work on priorities and achieve defined goals

 Cick to book your seat now.

Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Under Pressure!

To begin the course, participants will explore the causes and costs of workplace pressure as well as the benefits of creating balance. Participants will also learn what their pre-assignment score means.

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

Next, participants will learn how to identify their pressure points and create an action plan to manage them. They will also learn some tips for facing problems and when to seek help.

Emotional Intelligence

In this session, participants will learn about the seven human emotions and Plutchik’s wheel of emotions. They will also learn how to validate emotions in others, build optimism, and develop resilience.

Coping Toolkit

This session will give participants some ways to manage stress, cope with anger, and express themselves assertively.

Getting Organised

To wrap things up, participants will learn some ways to get organised and reduce pressure set up a action plan.

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

https://academyexpresscourses.com/2014/03/28/high-blood-pressure-hypertension-the-new-aids-epidemic/

nido how to move forward

http://www.shortcourses.expert

0203 551 2621

How to become a Ace Networker by Diane Shawe

CPD FrameworkYou know, sometimes all you need is 20 seconds of insane courage.  Just literally 20 seconds of just embarrassing bravery.  And I promise you, something great will come of it.

Life is meant to be an adventure.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

If your life is anything less than interesting and inspiring to other people, you’re doing something wrong. The range of possible thrills and spills at your disposal is limited only by your imagination and the choices you make. You are not too old. You are not too young. You don’t need to wait until you get a promotion, Get that big deal, have a funny success story. You don’t need more savings. You don’t need to wait until you’re finished university. You don’t need to wait for a better time.

Right now is the only moment you ever have. You can apply this to so many aspects of your life. 

Don’t you hate when you’ve showed up at a networking event late or on your own and you’re the only person who isn’t part of the conversation? Every time you try to say something you seem to get interrupted or ignored; and the more you try to take part, the more awkward things get. So you stare off into space, pretend to watch something or pull out your mobile phone and act like you just got a text message.

Nobody enjoys being a networking wallflower. No matter how shy or introverted you claim to be, beyond our fragile, wounded egos, we all so badly want to be a part of the conversation, to be paid attention, to have as much fun as everyone else. Sitting on the side lines is just boring and uncomfortable.

Sometimes all you need is 20 seconds of insane courage.

You reduce your nerves by mastering your start. This is essential because people can get so nervous before a communication that they:

  • Don’t make a good job of it.  For example, their presentations become a robotic read-through of boring slides, with zero personality and charm;
  • Or don’t even do it at all.  For example, when people say “I’m just too busy to go to that networking event”, but really mean “I’m too nervous, so I’ve de-prioritised it”

Both are understandable.  You can often reduce or even eliminate your nerves when you know how to start.  After all, if you’re clear what your first three sentences are and, by clear, I mean you know them word-for-word – you know you’ll start well.  So you do.  And then things tend to go well through the rest of it.

Networking?  You only need to know (1) who you’ll approach and (2) what you’ll say when you do:

  • If you see someone you know and like, go up to them and say “hello”!
  • If you don’t know/like anyone, go to someone standing on their own and say “mind if I join you?”

You’ll choose your own opening lines of course.  But do choose them.  Don’t hope it will turn out well when it matters, because it probably won’t.  Or it won’t be as good as it could have been.  Or you won’t even do it.

The key to making the transition from networking wallflower to networking Ace is to develop strong social skills, a great opening 20 seconds and to go in with the right mind set. The art of talking to strangers is a learnable skill. Through practice, you can go from frustrated networker to choosing your own adventure, by taking massive action to meet new people. It is the core skill of moving from the social side lines to centre stage. If you go out to social gatherings, but are uncomfortable anywhere but in your tiny little bubble of friends, those fake text message moments are virtually guaranteed.

10 tips on becoming social media influencer by Diane Shawe

When you go networking, make it your goal to amuse yourself by exchanging energy with people. This is the state of mind from which your entire social experience will flow. Instead of hanging out, treat networking as an intense form of play. Striving for acceptance is torture. It turns you into an energy vampire and only further annoys people who already weren’t that interested in you. Instead of seeking others’ approval, become the CEO of your own networking environment. Invest your attention into only those people, places, and things that amplify your energy and show you a good time.

Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.

Howard Thurman

Identify a communication you’re nervous about. Script, edit and practise how you’ll start. After that, it only takes 20 seconds of bravery and some planning.

Are you ready?

Are you focused, productive, transactional or inspirational? by Diane Shawe

shortcourses expert bannerBeing busy isn’t the same as being productive, but how do you assess what you need to do to improve both your productivity and your staff?

Would an online Personal Training Need Analysis that takes about 10 minutes help?

Then  CLICK HERE TO TRY ONE FREE Personal Training Needs Analysis and in as little as two hours you can judge for yourself if it would be of use in your business.

Would it help if you could find out how to get the best out of your employees?

Would it help to be able to speed up Pre-Interview selections, Staff Appraisals, Training Needs, Personal Development, Management Selection, Team building and any of those otherwise expensive long winded, time consuming and expensive process?

Well click on our complimentary link to see how it works, I promise you will not be disappointed.

What most people, employers, entrepreneurs and even some educational institutions do not have in today’s current environment is time, the necessary resources and the infrastructure they need to support and achieve learning objectives cost effectively.

Out with the Old in with the new but who is going to be ready at the ‘Start Line’ with all the right tools to assist with the new Continued Competences?

We can offer a person centric online Personal Training Needs analysis tools and  reports to aid in the development of any individuals or organisations growth. The profiles and learning programmes are designed to help reduce risk and to create action and results.  Goal setting is no good without implementation.

We invite you with our compliments to click and complete 10 simple questions and we will send you back a report so that you can see how it works and give us your feedback.

In order to better identify and appraise an individual to pinpoint specific training needs, the Speed of Implementation and adaption to change will confirm who gets ahead or sustain growth by using technology to help with self appraisal, self reflection and personal development.

However, the new skill set or competencies, aims to define the standards needed to enter, compete and remain in the profession which mainly comprise of the following:

  1. Ethics, professionalism and judgment;
  2. Financial Literacy and Technical ability;
  3. Managing yourself and your work;
  4. Working with other people.

That said, in order to meet these new core competencies, individuals and organisations will be required to undergo a process of self-reflection through a high-level Personal Training learning needs analysis to identify their own learning gaps; as well as identify gaps specific to those needed by the organisation they work with. Ideally, this process will be recorded and accompanied by an evaluation of the success of the learning completed and ultimately, organisations will be required to make an annual declaration that they have considered and taken action to address Point of Need training.

We look forward to your feedback once you get your free report back and then maybe we can discuss the speed of implementing this process throughout your business or consulting services.

Just click here now and in just 10 minutes you would have completed 10 questions and we will send you back the results.

 

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on learning outcome cover by diane shawe

 

“The only thing worse than training people and having them leave, is not training them and having them stay”

 

What do we do..

We specialise in resourcing short courses via a pre-populated LMS solution for Point of Need Training via mobile devices so that all different levels of staff can access training whilst on the move using their own device supported by one off our virtual tutors to help them complete their online 4 weeks course.

Why mentoring for women running a business has become critical

mentoring by diane shaweWhy Mentoring is important

It was revealed last year in a article that young women are more likely to fall into personal insolvency than young men of the same age. The figures, which were quite alarming if you’re a woman, showed that nearly eight out of 10,000 young women became insolvent last year, compared to just four men in 10,000

“Mentor: Someone whose hindsight can become your foresight”

Mentoring is a powerful personal and development tool. It is a partnership between two people (mentor and mentee) normally working in a similar field or sharing similar experiences – or conversely, perhaps you are looking to enter a new field and would like support from someone who has been there before. It is a helpful, supportive relationship based on mutual trust and respect.

What is a mentor

Mentoring is most often defined as a professional relationship in which an experienced person (the mentor) assists another (the mentoree) in developing specific skills and knowledge that will enhance the less-experienced person’s professional and personal growth.

What is a Coach

Coaching is training or development in which a person called a “coach” supports a learner in achieving a specific personal or professional goal. The learner is sometimes called a “coachee”. Occasionally, “coaching” may mean an informal relationship between two people, of whom one has more experience and expertise than the other and offers advice and guidance as the latter learns; but coaching differs from mentoring in focusing on competence specifics, as opposed to general overall development.

Some coaches use a style in which they ask questions and offer opportunities to challenge the learner to find his or her own answers. This helps the learner find answers and new ways of achieving their goals based on their own values, preferences and perspectives.

So your mentor is your guide who can help you to find the right direction, be a sounding board and support you in developing solutions for you and your business or lifestyle.

Getting Financed – A fair share for Women startup

Start-Up Loans are funded by the Government both for people starting up and new businesses trading for less than two years. They are easy to apply for and typically people borrow between £2,000 and £10,000, although there is no limit. Enterprising Women’s parent company YTKO has now been approved as a national provider of Start-up Loans, which means that Enterprising Women can now bring them to you!

WHY PRE START UP SUPPORT IS ALSO IMPORTANT

The Enterprising Women  also offer a wealth of pre-start support through their sister organisation Outset, as well as post-finance mentors to help keep you on track. So if you’re a new business (trading for less than two years months) looking to fund your growth or just starting out, – or know someone who is – click here to find out more.

The Start Up Loans Company is a UK-wide, government backed scheme, which offers a repayable loan to individuals over the age of 18 who have a viable business idea but no access to finance. The scheme funds businesses in every sector. As well as financial backing, all loan recipients are given access to a mentor, free training events and exclusive business offers.

If you are yet to start, or in your first two years of trading, then you will probably be eligible to apply. People typically borrow between £2,000 and £10,000 (the maximum loan is £25,000) and all loans come at a competitive, fixed rate of interest at 6.2% APR.

The Start Up Loans Application Process:

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Get mentoring with diane shawe business start up loans

Do women still derail each other in the workplace?

women derailing women by Diane Shawe 2015Are women other women’s own worst enemies at work?

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

There was an interesting essay a few weeks ago in the New York Times about workplace infighting among women. The piece describes how women can sometimes derail each other in the office. Is this true? One study by the Workplace Bullying Institute, for example, found that female office bullies, who commit verbal abuse, sabotage performance or hurt relationships, aim at other women more than 70% of the time. (Male workplace bullies, by contrast, tend to be equal-opportunity offenders, targeting both men and women.)

There are several theories why some women hurt other women in the workplace, but surely this must also apply to men… so lets check out some of the theories

Scarcity:

One is scarcity: there are few spots at the top, so women at higher levels are reluctant to help other women who could potentially usurp them.

D.I.Y Bootstrap Theory:

Another reason a bit more basic is called the “D.I.Y. Bootstrap Theory.” Some women reason that if they had to pull themselves up on their own, why should they help anyone else?

Fear of showing Favoritism;

Women may also be worried about showing favoritism toward other women, so instead, they can end up going too far in the other direction and go out of their way to not help their female colleagues.

Over Emotional:

And then there’s the idea that some women are over-emotional, which leads them to take challenges or criticism personally, hold grudges or get caught up in petty arguments.

The way forward

Becoming simply aware of these habits is not quite enough anymore “If we really want to clear one of the last remaining hurdles to gender parity and career success, let’s start by really understanding how to be resilient, focused, leadership skills, personal wealth management and personal profiling.

Readers, what do you think? If you’re a woman, have you experienced being derailed or undermined at a time of importance both to you career and self-esteem? How did you handle it? Have managers or colleagues been more supportive of your performance or do you feel like games are being played well if your tired of being tired here is a seminar for you…

Five Steps to avoiding being undermined and derailed Seminar 17th February 2015 at the Doubletree Hilton Westminster Hotel.
Five experienced speakers who will focus on:

How can you make yourself be heard without shouting?
Do you feel like you are constantly being derailed?
Are you uncomfortable about how to present yourself in front of a camera?
Do you need clarity on what type of Manager/leader you are?
Are you at that point in your life where you seriously need to carve out a financial haven for the future?

Download your free report on Strategies for Modernising Corporate Elearning by Diane Shawe

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on learning outcome cover by diane shawe

Is crowdfunding all that it’s cracked up to be?

Kick starting your business with crowd sourcing 1 day course

Crowdfunding is the newest way to raise money for startups who need capital. But not all crowdfunding is alike. Learn how to determine which crowdfunding platform is the best one for your business.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

All kinds of projects such as Businesses, nonprofits, artists, and entrepreneurs have all succeeded in raising some startup or expansion funds by presenting their campaigns on one of the many crowd funding platforms that have sprung up in recent years mainly due to the failure of banks to champion real business growth that requires an element of risk.

But as it becomes even more popular, the organisers are now wanting to ensure that their investors get a return on their often small investments. Crowdfunding isn’t a simply process of signing up for a service and listing your financial needs. The first step is finding the platform that is just right for your business and one other thing to take into consideration is the crowdfunding body assessing if your right for them.

Listed below is a brief Introduction to Various Types of Crowdfunding Sites and their links.

Like many other things, crowdfunding sites come in a lot of different shapes and sizes. There are crowdfunding sites for nonprofits and social causes: crowdfunding the peer to peer piggy bank

These are just a few. There are plenty more.

Crowdfunding sites for independent artists and people spearheading creative projects include:

If you want to start a business or find investors for your million dollar project, then perhaps one of these crowdfunding sites will be more your speed:crowd funding Growing_Fund by

LendInvest is a marketplace lending platform for residential and commercial mortgages. All loans on the LendInvest platform are secured by a registered legal charge against property in the UK.

Mortagage Peer to Peer Lending

Crowdfunding sites such as Kickstarter, Fundable and Indiegogo are responsible for some of the coolest projects coming out right now. The sky’s the limit when it comes to these projects. Everything from a music label deal to food companies, there is something for everyone.

Just check out the coolest top ten successes listed by Matthew Toren,
Serial Entrepreneur, Mentor and co-founder of YoungEntrepreneur.com
whiteboard schema : crowdfunding cs5
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