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10 Ways to Boost your Hair Extensions Business by Diane Shawe

Article by Diane Shawe Author: Extracts from Getting Started in the Hair Extensions Business

Sometimes you find things are going great and then the big slump takes a hold. How can you evaluate what you have done right and where you are going wrong?

Doing a SWOT analysis will give you a true picture of how your hair extension business could or should be running. It is essential to work out why some things are working in your business and why some are

SWOT stands for ‘strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats’. It is a well-known term in business and marketing. Performing a SWOT analysis is a very important part of running the business. It must be taken seriously

It is your own audit of your business no matter the size of it and should be done on a regular basis, at least annually. It’s not very complicated but could help keep you ahead of your competitors.

You may discover problems that you had no idea even existed. These can be addressed before they get out of hand. It will also highlight many assets, which could be utilised better, even opportunities, which could be taken advantage of.

The results of your SWOT analysis will be the basis for your marketing plans and decisions.

‘What they don’t tell you about getting started in the hair extension business’ summary from page 20 – 35 author Shawe D 2007

1) Form business alliances

Join up with other businesses to help each other build a bigger clientele.

Form an alliance with another business that has the same type of clientele as yours, for instance a business which involves beauty, nails, tanning, or fashion.

You can take this alliance as far as you like. You could set up shop together, or just refer clients to each other. You could do some advertising together and share the cost. Another idea is to hand out gift vouchers for each other. Each gift voucher could be for a free service.

It’s best if you both cater to clients who are at the same end of the market.

There’s not much point in marketing to people who simply can’t afford to come to your hair extension studio or pay for your services.
2. Choosing a Business

Choose a business where the people have the same business ethics as yours and a good database of clients.


3) Network

Throw the occasional cocktail party and invite the surrounding business owners, managers and employees of your choice. If you can build relationships with these people you may gain them as clients. Remember most men have girlfriends or wives and most women have other lady friends also.

They might also refer some of their customers and friends to you. Do this especially with the staff of beauty and fashion shops in your area. They are ideal people to get referrals from.
4) Get Quality Training

There are over 36 different hair extension techniques in the market place. If you really want to plan to be a success in this market, then you have to choose to become totally proficient in several techniques. There are many types of clients out there with varying hair problems, plan to be of service to you target market. Restricting yourself is restricting your potential income.


5) Be Classy (even if your working from home)

It’s best to set your hair extension studio up so that the right impact is made right from the moment the clients make an entrance or you make an entrance. Remember that the more professional the hair extension studio looks, the more you will be able to charge, as you will attract a more up market clientele. I always advise that the overall look must not out way the warmth and welcome of the studio. Clients like to feel relaxed with the staff and environment, not as if they are on show.
6) Flowers at reception or at your home always add a touch of class.

So does a smiling face, which helps to make each client’s, visit a welcoming visit right from the start. You can make the waiting area more impressive by including a great retail area, some hair extension brochures, and a book containing before and after photos. Provide some new, interesting magazines and hair books. Toss the old or torn ones out.
7) Always protect the clients clothing.

There should be a cupboard or rack for coats, or like some hair dressers have, a small dressing room for clients, who are given a gown to wear. This is a great idea as it removes the problem of high collars being in the way and clothes being ruined.


8) Get rid of shabby items.

Make sure there is a place for everything and enough storage space, so that the hair extension studio can be kept tidy. Get rid of the old wraps, used or shabby towels, and worn brushes. Never have dirty combs or tongs lying around. All of these things make a bad impression on clients.
9) No Carrier bags or damaged cases.

If you are mobile don’t turn up with carrier bags or a damaged beauty case. Make sure you are presentable and that your hair looks emaculate.
10) Don’t be afraid to change with the times.

If your hair extension studio starts to look outdated give it a facelift. Invest in the latest equipment. Make sure that the chairs not only look good, but also feel comfortable. If you are mobile make sure your equipment is up to date in line with your techniques.

The most valuable ebook for your hair extension business Click to order

What they don’t tell you Visit www.needahairmakeover.com to view a selection of 1 day courses.

Call us on 0121 318 2880 to discuss our courses we train in over 14 different techniques or if you would like to book an appointment to have your hair extensions done

Is there really a global skill race?

new rules of engagement towards long term employability-Entreployability the new breed by Diane Shawe jan 2014If there is a global skill race, who’s winning?

Governments all over the world want their countries to have high-value, high-skill economies, and they realise that the first step towards this aim is to have a well-educated workforce. In the UK, an appreciation of the connection between economic success and education has led to widening participation in university, as well as lifelong learning, being politicised as a priority.

But many Commentary from the organisations such as the Teaching and Learning Research Programme shows that this policy prescription may not be enough to avert a significant attack on skilled and professional employment in the UK.

Policy-makers have yet to appreciate the fundamental shifts which are now taking place in the way companies use skilled people. Large firms are increasingly aware that emerging economies, especially but not exclusively India and China, are building up their education systems at a rapid rate. Leading corporations are abandoning the idea that high-end activities such as research and design have to go on in the high-cost economies of Europe, North America or Japan. Instead, they are developing ways in which high-value work can be standardised, as manual work already has been. Once this is achieved, high-skill people in low-cost countries suddenly become an attractive option for multinationals.

This means that we may be entering an era in which many of the young people now investing heavily in their education across the developed world may struggle to attain the comfortable jobs and careers to which they aspire. They risk being bypassed by decisions to send work that would once have come their way naturally to people in Asia and elsewhere, who bring the same skills to employers at much lower prices.

We know that many people would argue that UK employers should provide work for UK people, but with the global competitive markets forcing prices down, UK employers need to remain competitive if they are indeed wanting to sell any of their services.

The Challenge

At least 26 million unemployed people have been looking for work across Europe during the long, hot summer of 2013. They will not be the only ones looking.

Millions of school and university leavers will join them in the search. Millions more are looking for more work than they already have – another part-time job, or a full-time job in place of part-time work.

And millions of others are not registered as unemployed but are also searching for paid work to supplement their income: pensioners in need; partners of someone in work whose wage has fallen; students who are studying full-time but cannot survive without a job on the side; children who are officially too young to work but whose families need the money.

Four key components that contribute to the challenges we all face ahead:

  1. Multi-Generational Workplace
  2. Technological Development
  3. Inexperienced
  4. Globalisation

13 Questions governments around the world will need to address that will affect you and your children’s children.

In order to help shape the
debate over labour and entrepreneurial policy for the twenty-first century we need to get involved in asking these questions throughout our communities, educational institute’s and economists. Questions such as:

  1. How do we ensure that workers get the skills they need to succeed in the twenty-first century workplace? (Not just the young people but those unemployed now)
  2. Will employers hire and train workers who initially lack skills?
  3. What happens to the worker laid off from a manufacturing job at age 55 —does he get training in new technologies or is he stuck in lower-wage jobs like groundskeeper, security guard, and warehouse stock controller?
  4. How do we make sure that people with disabilities have access to the technologies that facilitate their participation in the workplace?
  5. How will e-commerce impact employment?

To find out more, order your copy of ‘The new rules of engagement for long term employability’ By Diane Shawe

new rules of engagement towards long term employability-Entreployability the new breed by Diane Shawe jan 2014