Tag Archives: education and training

10 Costly Hair Extensions Mistakes by Diane Shawe

Celebrities on Red carpets and magazines have normalised hair extensions. Hair Extensions have been a trending topic among many women on YouTube. It is arguable that the main reason for the popularity of hair extensions is that one can get instant gratification. That extension adds to the thickness and fullness of hair in a shorter period of time than waiting for hair to grow.

As a woman, confidence is in constant flux, I know we all have those days that we just feel great. Our skin is glowing, our eyeliner went on just right, and our hair is lying the right way. And then we have those weeks where we just feel like our look has passed its expiration date.

Diane Shawe Author of ‘Getting Started in the Hair Extension Business’ and ‘How Hair Extensions are Sourced, Graded and Treated’ introduces the top 10 costly mistakes new and experienced clients make with their hair extensions.

1. Buying advertised premium Hair Extensions Cheaply

There is nothing wrong with cheap hair extensions but, when someone is marketing grade AAA virgin Brazilian double drawn human hair 18inches for £15 or $23 a bundle what sounds to Good to be true is often untrue.

If you do decide to buy this type of hair my advice is that they are only meant to be worn for fun or a couple of times.

Often cheap hair extensions are produced from mixed fibers and can look very glossy and healthy. If Worn excessively or worn to bed they will frizz and become matted.

All the other issues mentioned below would also be related.

So if you want your hair tho look like your favourite celebrity remember they are paying the going rates for the best.

2. Using Hair spray

Most hair extensions are processed abroad. In line with exporting regulations they have to be sprayed and sealed with an insect repellent so that insects cannot cross borders or the hair become infested by lice. Some hair extensions could be in packaging several months or a couple of years!

They are also subjected tho high pressure treatments such as colouring, perming and straightening. They then have tho be rehydrated and often gloss sealed to look enriching so you will buy and war them.

Hairspray from a can destroys all this. If you want to use a spray use pump action instead.

3. Leaving hair loose in bed

I advise all my clients to tie up their hair extensions at need time. Why?

To keep them from getting dried out from moisture from constantly being rubbed against the pillows.

To stop them becoming matted which would result in stressful brushing which causes premature loosening.

4. Wrong Brush

If your new tho hair extensions the brutish you choose to use will determine how your hair extensions look and are maintained.

The roots of your hair and the top of your hair extensions needed to be kept free from tangles short that the hair moves freely and naturally

You need to be able to brush your hair through so as to keep it tangle free workout tugging or causing pre mature loosening

The right brush will also help to make your hair look healtier and shiny.

5. Washing everyday

Hair Extensions do not produce their own oils, you have yup supplement and hydrate them yourself.

Washing them everyday will result in pre mature loosening as the water weighs them down and the oils in the shampoo makes them slide down with the weight of the water.

I know the objective is to probably wash your own greasy hair but it is best you separate the top of your own hair and wash that each day or use a reputable dry shampoo.

It is best to only wash your semi permanent hair extensions once a week to get the longest wear out of them.

6. Dehydration

Hair extensions will become dry and brittle and matt even more when they are dehydrated.

Central heating, air conditioned and being under electric lighting everyday and point 5 contributes to the drying out of hair extensions.

I recommend using a none oil based daily leave in conditioner. Spray from the roots through to the end every morning and before going to bed.

On the topic of Itchy scalp

People with normal to dry scalps will experience itching when wearing hair extensions because the hair extensions are absorbing what little moisture you have on your scalp so its making your scalp even more dry. Its important to spray the leave in conditioner onto your scalp.

With regards to clipins read my article about clipin.

7. Changing hair Extensions colour

In my professional opinion there should be no need to colour hair extensions because most of the popular colours are in distribution.

However as 90% of hair extensions come from Asia were all natural hair colour is black the only hair I will personally work with is 100% natural virgin hair.

If you are not experienced in knowing the difference between blended hair, human hair and virgin hair don’t attempt to re-colour it could be an expensive mistake.

8. Not preparing for holiday

OMG the amount of disaster stories I have heard with regards to this subject matter. Customers spend hundreds on lovely hair prior to flying out on that dream holiday only to end up with a partner or friend cutting it out. This is a big subject and the best I can do is recommend you download my care brochure by clicking here.

9. Oil based products

When you pour oil into water it floats, oil coats things, only the ingredient it is carrying penetrates. So when you put too much oil on your hair extensions it weighs them down, it sticks to your hair and attract the invisible particles to stick to your hair (the bits you see under a purple ultralight)

Try to use none oil based products, try not to commit murder by serums on your hair extensions.

10. Going to bed with wet hair

Why would you want to go to bed with your hair wet? Why would you be washing your hair that late anyway, why not in the morning? It makes no sense! Rant over… Just don’t do it! Matting, Tugging, Loss of hair so extensions look thinner, pre mature loosening I think you get the message.

Other articles you might find interesting

10 Signs You Need a Hair Makeover
https://www.all-about-hair-extensions.com/single-post/2017/12/19/10-Signs-You-Need-a-Hair-Makeover

Checkout our Face Shape Blog it might help https://academyexpresscourses.com/2017/08/04/matching-your-face-shape-to-a-hair-extension-hairstyle/

More info on Clipin hair Extensions

https://academyexpresscourses.com/2015/07/08/clip-in-hair-extensions-can-cause-traction-alopecia-if-worn-for-over-5-hours-a-day/

Is Adult Education Broken away from its Historical Purpose?

The historical purpose of education

First let me quote Jane Stanford of Standford University

“with a ‘spirit of equality’, one of my goals for the university is to resist the tendency and the stratification of society, by keeping open an avenue whereby the deserving and exceptional may rise through their own efforts from the lowest to the highest stations in life”.

According to various hypothesis and statements, the first and foremost purpose of education is to educate and give everyone equal opportunity as a means to succeed in life. Education is a way of igniting and enlightening the thought of an individual.

It should help learners to discriminate between knowledge and ignorance, help to create a spark and create the sense of realisation with logic and a way to reason why the other things are illogical.
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The purpose of vocational education

Every man must have a vocation – a trade, a business, or a profession – (if they are able too) in order to earn his livelihood so that they can support themselves, their family and people who cannot help themselves in our society. There are institutions for imparting various types of specialised training to help people qualify for this. The specialist is in demand everywhere, – in the office as well as in factories, in educational institutions and governments.

The Interlinkages between Technology and the economy

Innovation is pushing ahead at warp speed. We are certainly living through one of the most exciting periods in human history. The pace of change is so fast that even the technology of five years ago seems prehistoric.

Those of you who are students probably do not even remember a time when phones were not smart when cameras contained film when texts meant school books, and when wireless was a word used for old-fashioned radio! In view of this whilst conducting my mini research for this paper, I began to wonder how some of the following statements and themes became interwoven into the core of education and who started this process?

So let’s take a look at some of these themes and schemes, like me I think you will begin to wonder what happened to simply teaching someone something properly.

Extracts from the latest book by Diane Shawe – Is Adult Education Broken

Why Black men will be Disproportionately Devastated by Industries drive towards Automation

 Black men and disproportionate employment

Black male graduates in London and throughout the UK are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts, figures suggest. In 2016 there was an unemployment rate of 18% for black male graduates aged 16 to 24 in the capital.

According to the data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the rate for their white counterparts was 10%. A government spokesperson said the employment rate for ethnic minorities was “at a record high”. So if the graduates, the brightest and best are having such a hard time what about the lower skilled or unqualified black men?

But for now lets focus on London. More than 83,000 young men in London are from black and mixed black ethnic groups, making up about one in five of young men in the capital.

Research by the National Audit Office (NAO) has found that along with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women, black men consistently have the lowest employment rates in the UK.

BBC London contacted 50 of London 500 top graduate employers last year across the banking, accounting, medical, legal and retail sectors. Eleven were able to provide data relating to their employment of black men specifically. Those 11 organisations recruited 1,803 graduates in 2016. Of those, 30 were black men.

The NHS leadership academy, for trainee managers, was among those which did not recruit any among its intake of 112 graduates.

Larry Elliott Economics Editor for the Guardian headlined on 4th April 2018 that Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD he goes on to write:

The west’s leading economic thinktank has warned its members that they are failing to prepare workers for an automation revolution that will leave 66 million people at risk of being replaced by machines in the coming years.

A new report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the most vulnerable – one in seven workers on average across the 32 countries studied – were less likely to be receiving help than those whose jobs were more secure.

The OECD said 14% of jobs in developed countries were highly automatable, while a further 32% of jobs were likely to experience significant changes to the way they were carried out.

Low-skilled people and youth were among those most at risk, according to the report, with the jobs at highest risk tending to be in low-skill sectors such as food preparation, cleaning and labouring. Workers in fully automatable jobs were more than three times less likely to have participated in on-the-job training, over a 12-month period, than workers in non-automatable jobs. Those most at risk were also less likely to participate in formal education or distance learning.

In September 2017 Mr Lammy a Tottenham MP reviewed the BAME people in the criminal justice system and found that in the UK black people who make up just 3% of the UK population make up 12% of the people in prison at a cost to the tax payer of £309m each year.

Whilst the report highlighted failings on the part of police forces, courts and prisons, it was identified that other issues like one parenthood, school exclusions, low income and high unemployment disproportionately affect some ethnic minority groups and have been linked to higher levels of criminality.

Is Adult Education for Graduates BrokenDiane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken?’ states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat for all groups, but has always inexplicably affected the BAME groups. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”.

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Isaac Asimov quote sharpens our focus

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

A recently published book by #DianeShaweAuthor ‘Is #Adult #Education Broken’?  explores the main failings in the educational system for an economy powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. What are the lessons to be learnt?

Download a copy from #amazon today Claim you copy now

Why employers and training organisations need to take heed of this global trend

Diane Shawe CEO AVPT

Diane Shawe CEO

The Changing face of Skills and Training

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed CEO

In a report conducted by Kelly Global Workforce Index in 2013 over 120,000 respondents from 31 countries across the Americas, EMEA an APAC regions where asked several questions about Skills and Training.

When asked to identify the main motivation for earning new skills or undertaking training, the largest share of employees 57% cited the opportunity for promotion with their current employer. A further 47% cited the opportunity to work in another organisation, and 42% planned to enter a new field of work.

Globally, 60% of worker are either actively seeking further education or training (23%) or considering it (37%).  The APAC region stands out as a skilling hotspot, with 69% of those surveyed either considered or seeking further training for a new field.

Across the globe, there are markedly different approaches to the notion of additional training and professional development. The highest rates of planned upskilling are predominantly in developing economies, while the lowest rates tend to be in some of the most prosperous nations.

Russia heads the list for training intensity, with an astonishing 92% planning some form of training. Also high on the list are Thailand, Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, Puerto Rico and Malaysia.

Surprisingly the lowest rates of planned training are in France, Luxembourg, the US and Switzerland.

Among professional and technical employees, those most likely to be actively seeking to upgrade their skills are in Math, Engineering and IT, while the least likely are in Science, Health Care and Education.

Investing in Training that Works

For training to be meaningful it needs to be relevant and practical – not “training for training sake”.

When asked to identify the mot desirable means of furhering their skills, the overwhelming preference was for on-the-job experience and training, identified by 70% of respondents, significantly ahead of the next hightest ranked “continued education and training” cited by 58%

Building a durable Skills base

The last two decades have radically altered the way skill are acquired and developed. Skill are no longer “front-end loaded” onto a career. Rather they are increasingly embedded as part of lifelong learning and development.

The upgrading and renewal of skills plays a critical role in personal and professional development. It also has a vital role in broader workforce development, which is the cornerstone of organisational efficiency and productivity.

All skills have a finite life, and in industries subject to high rates of technological change and innovation, the lifespan of skills is becoming shorter. Increasingly, new skills will need to be learned and deployed throughout a working life.

It is clear that decisions about training and professional development are now an integral part of the employment equation, and have an important bearing on employee moral, performance and retention.

What Employers can do

  • Consider opportunities for training and personal development.
  • Help to build a culture of continuous learning so that employees are encouraged to develop and use new skills
  • Encourage employees to think about career plans and the type of skills and training they need to stay equipped.
  • Consider training as a key element in employee attraction and retention.
  • Champion individuals who have devoted time to upskilling so they can become ambassadors for an organisation.

The landscape has changed

The scale and duration of the downturn has forced may employees to look afresh at the whole area of training and professional development – one that was previously guided by employers.  Employees now recognise that they cannot solely rely on an employer to direct in this important element of their lives.

A new generation of workers is taking on much greater responsibility for their training and professional development, including the way it is provided and funded.

The global economic shock-waves have unleashed a new orthodoxy and a unforeseen outcomes has a new generation of employees are more independent, globally focused and adaptive.  The new challenges for global employers is to understand why the landscape has changed and prudently look beyond the present and where the best skilled workforce will be and what work will look like in 10 or 15 years.

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses