Tag Archives: online college

Outsourcing your knowledge

Albert EinsteinWhy knowing less helps you to do more.

Diane Shawe M.Ed. 

When you think about the power of your brain and how we learn, memorise and recall all those facts, it can get very confusing. Having taught for nearly 25 years and trained some of the brightest professionals over last 10 years, I believe that knowledge is divided in two distinct areas. We can either know about a subject ourselves or we know where we can retrieve information on that subject. The massive amount of information available online has opened an infinite library of easily and quickly retrievable information with simple search engines. I like to think of it as an organic external hard drive, an outsourced memory we can plug in at any time. Some have argued that the internet dilutes the most traditional kind of knowledge: knowing a subject ourselves. They argue that in some way it makes our brains less efficient, diminishing our intelligence and destroying our inner hard drives and memory.

You may remember (if you are of a certain age) that when you were young, you knew by heart the phone number of your closest friends. Since the introduction of digital directories on smartphones there is no longer any reason to memorise numbers by heart.   On the other hand, how many hundreds more contacts do you have now compared to then thanks to the digital directories? In reality, how much more connected are you? The real deal of the information age is not that it allows us to know more, but that it allows us to know less in terms of depth of what we know, as mentioned by David Brooks, a New York Times columnist, in his famous 2006 NY Times article[1] The Outsourced Brain.

neuroscience brain“Memory? I’ve externalised it.” He said, “I am one of those baby boomers who are making this the “It’s on the Tip of My Tongue Decade.” But now I no longer need to have a memory, for I have Google, Yahoo and Wikipedia. Now if I need to know some fact about the world, I tap a few keys and enjoy the vast resource of the external mind.”

I think the positive side of this is that we are free to expand our awareness of subjects we did not have space, or availability, to explore before. Our memory now has a different function: it is a digital index that remembers the existence of a subject and what are the best leads to find information on that subject. I too had thought that the magic of the information age was that it allowed us to know more facts. Then I realised that the magic of the information age is that it allows us to know less.

It provides us with external cognitive servants, silicon memory systems if you will, with collaborative online filters, consumer preference algorithms and networked knowledge. We thus can give these servants the massive raw data and liberate ourselves to think, explore and be creative. You can use your brain to learn new skills, the soft skills that are the true measure of success.

Your outsourced memory (the internet, the cloud and more) allows you to be aware of the existence of information you would never have come across before when you were limited to what your inner memory could hold. It allows you to increase the quantity (and thus the quality) of the information that you can process because you do not always have to worry about memorising every single detail of it. It allows you to use more brain power in linking concepts and applying them rather than remembering them. It empowers you to think and process information faster because your brain has the space to hold links to so much different information, and in doing so it expands your subjective time. Back in the analogue era, the difference between a deep brain and a shallow brain was the availability of information and the choice of whether to take in that information or not came second.

As an educationalist and technophile, combined with my outsourced memory I have the capacity to think deeper. Now that (nearly) everything is available, the power is back to you: it is up to you to take responsibility of what content goes into your mind and how you use your outsourced memory.

Now you have begun to outsource your brain and now have room to do something rather special with your neo-cortex. Enjoy.

 

Is free online courses dumbing down adult education?

Ignorance is not bliss

Ignorance is not bliss

Is free online courses dumbing down adult education?

Adult education has become under-valued in an overpriced educational infrastructure.

The people who need the most help are already systematically ripped off by greedy loan companies, NHS parking, having to pay charges for drawing out their own money from private ATM machines in poorer boroughs, pre-paid electric meter’s to name but a few.  The more you seem to need help the more you seem to have to pay.

Off course the arguments are always about risk, but to compound on top of their needs, a premium, just to make sure the risk is compensated for is questionable indeed.

But another kind of ripping off is taking place. ‘Free online education’ you may ask ‘why is this a rip off?’

I will answer this from my prospective initially and then make further arguments as to why we should be very concerned about this unpoliced, unchallenged butchery of the values originally infused into our adult educational system.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.”

What has happened?  Why have these large institutions priced education out of some fundamental principles?

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area.  Fundamentally, we need to innovate what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an ever changing economy. It is evident that computers can do that for us!

What should a 21st Pedagogy for Adult Education Look Like?

A 21st century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

We need to make sure that the type of education can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs within a community.

I believe that education has to become student centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

There has always been a great deal of lip service given to the idea of learning by doing, but not much has been done about it. In fact, John Dewey remarked in 1916, in his book, Democracy and Education:  

“Why is it that, in spite of the fact that teaching by pouring in, learning by passive absorption, are universally condemned, that they are still so entrenched in practice? That education is not an affair of “telling” and being told, but an active constructive process, is a principle almost as generally violated in practice as conceded in theory”


I think it is imperative that this century focuses on Adult Transformative Learning because, if we don’t, we are already seeing the internet unintenionally affect the minds of some of our  impressional adults who have no sence of usefulness within our society and can be easily motivated in learned stimulative blended information that could be perceived as devisive withing many communities.

“Transformative learning is a structured way forward in time of crisis when Individuals face Collective Challenges”

                                                 Diane Shawe M.Ed.

During the last twenty years, the use of the word “crisis” seems to have increased around the world. Referring to sudden and intense political, economic, social, psychological, cultural or environmental changes, this term emerges now more frequently in everyday vocabulary.

According to transformative learning theory, the emergence of a crisis represents a potential opportunity for personal and/ or collective transformation, grounded in the capacity of individuals and groups to revisit the perspectives through which they interpret their own experience.

Considering recent history, how does the emergence of social, economic, political, cultural, intellectual or environmental crisis manifest an opportunity, or an expression, of transformative learning?

In the mean time I think that some of these fundlemental questions need to be addressed:

  • How does the experience of individual or collective crisis affect the way one learns to critically interpret one’s own experiences?
  • What are the learning resources required in order to overcome the experience of individual or collective crisis?
  • What kinds of learning opportunities facilitate the management of personal and collective transformations triggered by a crisis?
  • What are the emerging issues and how do they affect research on transformative learning?

How can we effectively deal with some of these burning question when we are constantly dumbing down Adult education?

If you would like a copy of  my full essay on this topic fill in the form below to request a copy be sent to you.

10 Top Tips on How to Influence Online buying by Diane Shawe

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The trends and predictions are already in for 2016. Many digital advancements will be made in 2016, from the rise of mobile messaging apps to mobile commerce finally gaining some mojo. 

You the reader even you are becoming more savvy and intend to be heard when things are not going right.  Smartphone use is driving up the number of inbound calls to businesses. Voice-activated search has been rising steadily. Consumers are talking to personal assistants through their smartphones and cars, and those “assistants” are getting smarter. And with the rise of smart watches and connected home devices, they’re talking to a wider variety of devices from various locations.

Marketers need to be prepared and ready to optimise digital content for speech-based (not keyword) queries and learn how to make sure that content can be discovered by personal assistants.

– So what about small businesses, the lone sole trader, what can you do to influence online buying?

  1. Change your ads Your prospects could get bored seeing the same ad all the time. Statistics show people usually see the same ad 7 times before they actually buy. Just change them enough to keep them from being over-exposed. For example, if your ad said. “FREE Killer Marketing E-book!”, you could change it later on to “FREE Sizzling Marketing E-book!”
  2. Give people a deadline to order. Tell people if they order by January 15 2016, they will get a discount or free bonuses. This will create an urgency so they don’t put off buying. Another example, “Order before 8:00 p.m. and get a second product of your choice for free!”
  3. Publish testimonials on your ad copy. They will give your business credibility and you’ll gain people’s It’s important to include the person’s full name and location with the testimonial.
  4. Allow people to make money reselling the product or Tell people they can join your affiliate program if they order. You could pay them per sale, per click, per referral, etc. Just provide them with proven and tested marketing materials, detailed statistics and plenty of affiliate training.
  5. Offer a buy-one, get-one-free deal. If you sell more than one product, this type of deal works People will feel they are getting more for their money and will order quicker. You could also offer them a ‘buy one, get one half’, ‘buy two, get the third one free’, ‘buy two, get a free watch’.
  6. Have them sign up to get access to download a free e-book. The subject of the e-book should be related to your target audience. You could have them sign up to a opt-in list or your regular The e-book should have high perceived value so they’ll take the time to sign up. Landing pages are really good for this.
  7. Give your visitors a free membership inside your Members Only web site or closed membership group on LinkedIn or Facebook. Have them sign up to receive a user name and password or an exclusive invitation. Members groups are particularly good on LinkedIn and your blogs because each time you post some news they get an automatic update.
  8. Offer your visitors free consulting via e-mail. Have them fill out a web form to e-mail you with their When you answer their questions, include an offer for a product you sell or highly recommend products that could help them. You could join the product’s affiliate program to earn commission if they take your advice.
  9. Give people free bonuses when they order your product or The free bonuses could be books, jewelry, reports, newsletters, etc. Make their bonuses sound extra valuable by listing their retail value, either separately or together in one amount, or limiting how long you will offer the bonuses. (you can partner with free gift websites)
  10. Provide free package and postage with all orders. If you can’t afford it, you could offer free P&P on orders over a specific You could also offer a rebate on their P&P costs. Most customers probably won’t send in the rebate card unless it’s a huge shipping cost, for example, £30 or more

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Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on outcomes

there's never been a better time to start a short coureTHE SPEED OF CHANGE IN MODERN BUSINESS DEMANDS A NEW APPROACH TO SUPPORTING LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE AT THE POINT OF NEED.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

“THE IMPORTANCE AND EVIDENCE -BASED APPROACH TO
LEARNING USING MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IS INFLUENCING HOW INVESTMENT IN CONTINUED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF A WORKFORCE IS ACHIEVED”

New market opportunities open and close at blinding speed, new competitors emerge overnight, product lifecycles are getting shorter, and customers are more knowledgeable and sophisticated. This fast-changing environment has led to requirement to change learning and training. However more often than not, the task of aligning the learning organisation to the business can be challenging and the perception of how the business views the learning organisation in terms of aligning to strategic initiatives is different to how the learning organisation perceives itself.

Downsizing has resulted in a mass drainage and outflow of skills as employees or contractors are let go. To ensure that an organisation can compete globally and remains at par with the technological changes in the global market committing to the investment of on-going skill training is often viewed as a potential unnecessary incision into the bottom line
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Corporates, enterprises and charities all wish to run their operations at the minimum costs allowed. We all recognise that in today’s environment, business moves faster than ever. Most organisations now recognise the importance of developing a strategic approach to learning and harnessing the internal skills of their teams. Moving away from more tactical based activities associated with training such as measuring skills-based behaviours, to focusing on acquisition of knowledge and learning transfer that result in individual and organisational performance improvements.

With the explosion of mobile technology, organisations need to take advantage of the benefits, scalability, and viability of using mobile e-learning, using smart phones, tablets, and notepads that offer a blended solution.

E-learning has the potential to fully integrate the benefits of personal freedom with connectivity (belonging to a purposeful group of learners). From an educational perspective the “e” in e-learning stands for more than electronic; it can also stand for extending and enhancing the learning experience.

Fulfilling the buyers requirements

Corporate strategy for modernising learning free report by Diane ShaweThe four pillars that go to underpin the buyer’s requirements and therefore still define the industry offerings are centred on the following: • Compliance and accreditation

  • Scalable and flexible whilst achieving a real reduction in Cost
  • Improving, tracking and measuring Learners’ performance
  • Real time management, alignment and communication to support on-going changes.
  • The ability to track and report learner performance remains uppermost in many procurers’ minds.

Isaac Asimov’s quote is now more urgent and relevant if corporates are to gain a lean and competitive advantage with a progressive highly skilled workforce for the 21st century.

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.”

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on outcomes rather than input by Diane Shawe M.Ed

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Why the legal profession is changing – Part-time partners

CPD on the move with expresscourses

CPD on the move with expresscourses

Only 9.4% of equity partners in law firms are women, despite equal numbers of men and women entering the profession

Article by Nicky Richmond Guardian Professional,

The statue of justice at the Old Bailey court in London. Photograph: Martin Argles for the Guardian

In the world of big law, equity partnership is broadly equivalent to being on a board of directors. In the top 100 law firms in the UK, just 9.4% of equity partners are women. This is even lower than the percentage of board members at FTSE 250 companies who are women, at 9.6%.

Given that equal numbers of women and men enter the legal profession, why is it that so many women don’t reach equity partnership? The Women’s Business Council – set up to advise the government on how to get more women into executive positions – came up with some interesting conclusions in a recent report.

They reveal an overwhelmingly masculine, patriarchal corporate culture, and point to the double burden of work and domestic responsibilities, the “anytime, anywhere” model of management and, a particular curse in the UK, the long hours working culture wired into city law firms.

A large proportion of women who drop out of law do so because they decide to have a family. Many women feel that they simply cannot combine the demands of life in a law firm with the demands of their families.

It’s little surprise they reach this depressing conclusion; at most law firms it is either full-time or nothing. A law firm may offer a woman a career downgrade to ‘support lawyer’ status but for many the cut in remuneration for part-time working or a lesser role are options not worth considering. Factor in the expense of childcare, and it’s little wonder many women conclude that the high cost simply isn’t worth it.

The goal of a partnership becomes more distant for many women once they decide to have a family. In many firms there is no route to partnership for lawyers who work part time. It just isn’t allowed. This is not only morally wrong, it is nonsensical.

There is no reason why a part-time lawyer – female or male – cannot make an outstanding contribution as a partner in their practice. Critical to a woman’s decision as to whether or not she returns to work following maternity leave must be the availability of flexible working. This means flexibility in both hours and location.

In order for things to change in law firms, firms must prioritise retaining their best people for as long as possible. This could include accommodating requests for part-time or flexible working. Given the demands of clients this isn’t always easy, but in most cases – with a real will on both sides – it can be done.

I work for a law firm that is owned equally between men and women. This is key to the day-to-day operations. A number of our lawyers work on a part-time basis. Some work certain days from home, others are consultants who hardly ever come into the office. We try to accommodate people’s real lives and ultimately, it’s the service to the client that counts.

Equality in the law will not happen on its own. In the 25 years I have been in practice I have seen all sorts of attempts to deal with ‘the women issue’, but evidently none of them have worked. Suddenly, however, it has become clear to City law firms that losing women is losing them money. So now, in line with the government’s recommendations, some of those firms have introduced their own targets for senior women. Money talks, and that’s what will drive the change.

AVPT CPD PRESSED FOR TIME LAW FIRMS

Does nine different kinds of intelligence make you any smarter?

In this article, I will talk about the different ways in which Multiple Intelligence Theory can be implemented in e-Learning to help the learner effectively acquire, retain, and utilise the information being provided within the e-Learning course.

the enquiry process to soft skills training april 2014

The Multiple Intelligence Theory was developed by Dr. Howard Gardner in 1983. Dr. Gardner, a noted psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, suggested that every human being interacts with their environment differently. We each possess nine different kinds of intelligence, but our experiences, cultural beliefs, and knowledge base determine their exact configuration.

What is “intelligence”, according to Multiple Intelligence Theory?

According to Gardner, there are three key elements that determine a person’s intelligence:

  1. The ability to create a service or product that will be valued in the person’s society of culture.

  2. A skill set that allows the person to solve real world problems that they may encounter in life.

  3. The ability to potentially create new solutions for problems or to utilize existing solutions. This typically involves the acquisition of new knowledge. 

Multiple Intelligence-Based Activities in eLearning

Multiple Intelligence Theory can be implemented in eLearning based upon the nine multiple intelligences. Let’s take a closer look at each category and which multiple intelligence-based activities can be utilized during instructional design to create the best possible eLearning experience for the learners:

  1. Musical (or Rhythmic) Intelligence
    This intelligence involves the capacity to think and learn in terms of music and rhythm, and to recognize and hear patterns. An activity that would appeal to this type of intelligence is a lesson that includes music or sound, such as a multimedia presentation. Try to use music that emphasizes the subject matter and creates a more immersive experience for the learner. Since there is more of an auditory aspect with this particular intelligence, lectures can also be very helpful. People who demonstrate a high degree of musical intelligence may be ideally suited for musical professions, such as composing or playing an instrument.

  2. Linguistic Intelligence
    This intelligence is associated with expression through language. These people tend to be able to eloquently convey their thoughts and to understand the words of others. Writers and speakers typically display a high degree of this sort of intelligence. Any activities that include discussion, such as online forums or group-based scenarios, are ideal for individuals who lean more toward linguistic intelligence.

  3. Mathematical (or Logical) Intelligence
    This involves the ability to identify principles or structures within a system. This intelligence is often associated with the logic or the manipulation of numbers.  Activities ideally suited for this intelligence may include diagrams, charts, or tables. Critical thinking scenarios are also useful with this group. Accountants and researchers often have a high level of mathematical intelligence.

  4. Kinesthetic (or Bodily) Intelligence
    Body Intelligence involves the use of a person’s entire body to figure out solutions or to create something. People who demonstrate a high degree of kinesthetic intelligence may be ideally suited for performing arts professions, such as dancing, or careers that require an innate knowledge of one’s own body, such as a doctor or athlete. Activities that are best suited for this sort of intelligence include games that involve hand-eye-coordination or interactive scenarios that require physical involvement. The thing to keep in mind about this group is that they are best able to learn when muscular movement is involved. So, include activities that require movement and physical response.

  5. Spatial Intelligence
    This intelligence pertains to a keen sense of space and how one can navigate those spaces. Activities that involve flow charts and graphics are ideal for this intelligence group, as well as games or multimedia that is visually appealing.  Architects, pilots, and sailors often have a high degree of spatial intelligence.

  6. Intrapersonal Intelligence
    This involves an in depth understanding of oneself, such as what you can accomplish and how you react to certain situations. As such, individuals with high intrapersonal intelligence often have a sense of what they should avoid and what they want to achieve in their lives. Professors and philosophers often possess high degrees of intrapersonal intelligence. Activities such as collaborative learning exercises (online forums) and chat programs enable intrapersonal intelligence learners to help others and to share experiences and ideas. This category responds well, first and foremost, to activities, which require introspection.

  7. Interpersonal Intelligence
    This is the capacity to understand and learn from others. People who demonstrate a high degree of intrapersonal intelligence may be ideally suited for service professions, such as teaching or politics. Those who identify more with this category of intelligence may benefit from group discussion activities and in depth questions that make them fully explore the topic. What’s important to remember about interpersonal intelligence is that these individuals are sensitive to others’ moods and feelings. They work well in-group settings and are often able to learn more effectively when collaborating.

  8. Naturalist Intelligence
    This intelligence involves the capacity to differentiate between living organisms and to view the connection between all natural things.  People with a high degree of naturalist intelligence usually have a close bond with nature. Botany and biology are two career fields that closely identify with this sort of intelligence. Activities that involve classification or organization appeal to these individuals.

  9. Existential Intelligence
    This particular intelligence was added later by Gardner, and is not commonly associated with learning environments, as it is geared more toward spiritual and philosophical views. For example, someone who has a high degree of existentialist intelligence may have a tendency to pose questions about life’s purpose or death. 

It’s important to note that instructional designers should not feel obligated to incorporate all of these multiple intelligence-based activities into their eLearning courses, just that it may be beneficial to offer a variety of multiple intelligence-based activities to more effectively illustrate the subject matter. If you are able to offer learners a diverse set of learning tools and eLearning strategies, then you gain the ability to increase comprehension and retention, not to mention enhance the overall eLearning experience.

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses

Call us to inquiry about our soft skills courses

Leading Training Provider ‘AVPT’ Approved To Deliver CPD ‘Soft Skills’ Courses To The UK Legal Industry

CPD does not have to be hard anymore

CPD does not have to be hard anymore

Press Release  Press Release

London UK, Thursday 3rd April 2014 – A national organisation specialising in the delivery of vocational and professional training has been approved to deliver recognised ‘soft skills’ courses to the legal profession, following formal assessment and accreditation by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority.

The Academy of Vocational and Professional Training (AVPT) now offer ‘soft skill’ courses within the legal sector after successfully becoming the latest organisation in the UK to reach the expecting standards required by the national regulatory body. Not only are the courses approved and recognised industry wide, but also count towards CPD certification of course candidates.

Within professional development arenas, it is now widely accepted the development of ‘soft skills’ within a workforce plays a significant part in the performance and continued success of companies and organisations across every niche. This has lead to an upsurge in organisations looking to complement the traditional ‘hard skill’ base with ‘soft skill’ development programmes.

Law firms begin to up skill their staff with soft skills

Law firms begin to up skill their staff with soft skills

In contrast to the occupational ‘hard-skills’ – those needed to physically undertake a role, ‘soft skills’ focus on the personal characteristic traits which allow individuals to excel in the work place, such as communication, empathy, emotional intelligence and social interaction.

As the legal industry settles after a fundamental reshaping which has resulted in a considerable increase in competition from smaller firms and individuals, law firms across the country are adapting their approach by improving the soft skill abilities of their employees and partners. Modernisation has helped them recognise the importance of technology in the learning environment to overcome geographical, language barriers and time constraint when up-skilling their entire business, so as to become more customer and user friendly.

The current range of ‘soft skill’ development packages for the legal profession have been specifically tailored to meet the needs and requirements of clients working in legal niches. Skills such as HR, Marketing with Social Media, Information management, Leadership & Management skills, Business development, Negotiations and customer services to name but a few from the list of 300 which can now count towards their annual CPD requirements.

Diane Shawe, CEO of AVPT commented “in 2013 the Legal Services Policy Institute estimate as many as 3,000 high street law firms (or 35% of the total) will have to disappear in the subsequent upheaval, law firms with good local reputations will be able to withstand competition if they can successfully reach the demands of clients for greater convenience and ease of access to services by generating greater efficiencies within their practices.”

AVPT is the only UK globally accredited online and workshop based provider of over 300 Soft Skills courses, which uses a cutting edge proprietary online learning management system. Workshop courses are professionally executed in 1-3 days which are delivered as foundation to expert levels.

AVPTLTD LOGO  6As a provider of Soft Skill training courses which are accredited by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority and globally by the IAO, AVPT are now offering CPD applicable courses to the legal profession. For further information please visit the official website at www.academy-of-vocational-and-professional-training.comor get in touch using the details shown with this release.

Is there really a global skill race?

new rules of engagement towards long term employability-Entreployability the new breed by Diane Shawe jan 2014If there is a global skill race, who’s winning?

Governments all over the world want their countries to have high-value, high-skill economies, and they realise that the first step towards this aim is to have a well-educated workforce. In the UK, an appreciation of the connection between economic success and education has led to widening participation in university, as well as lifelong learning, being politicised as a priority.

But many Commentary from the organisations such as the Teaching and Learning Research Programme shows that this policy prescription may not be enough to avert a significant attack on skilled and professional employment in the UK.

Policy-makers have yet to appreciate the fundamental shifts which are now taking place in the way companies use skilled people. Large firms are increasingly aware that emerging economies, especially but not exclusively India and China, are building up their education systems at a rapid rate. Leading corporations are abandoning the idea that high-end activities such as research and design have to go on in the high-cost economies of Europe, North America or Japan. Instead, they are developing ways in which high-value work can be standardised, as manual work already has been. Once this is achieved, high-skill people in low-cost countries suddenly become an attractive option for multinationals.

This means that we may be entering an era in which many of the young people now investing heavily in their education across the developed world may struggle to attain the comfortable jobs and careers to which they aspire. They risk being bypassed by decisions to send work that would once have come their way naturally to people in Asia and elsewhere, who bring the same skills to employers at much lower prices.

We know that many people would argue that UK employers should provide work for UK people, but with the global competitive markets forcing prices down, UK employers need to remain competitive if they are indeed wanting to sell any of their services.

The Challenge

At least 26 million unemployed people have been looking for work across Europe during the long, hot summer of 2013. They will not be the only ones looking.

Millions of school and university leavers will join them in the search. Millions more are looking for more work than they already have – another part-time job, or a full-time job in place of part-time work.

And millions of others are not registered as unemployed but are also searching for paid work to supplement their income: pensioners in need; partners of someone in work whose wage has fallen; students who are studying full-time but cannot survive without a job on the side; children who are officially too young to work but whose families need the money.

Four key components that contribute to the challenges we all face ahead:

  1. Multi-Generational Workplace
  2. Technological Development
  3. Inexperienced
  4. Globalisation

13 Questions governments around the world will need to address that will affect you and your children’s children.

In order to help shape the
debate over labour and entrepreneurial policy for the twenty-first century we need to get involved in asking these questions throughout our communities, educational institute’s and economists. Questions such as:

  1. How do we ensure that workers get the skills they need to succeed in the twenty-first century workplace? (Not just the young people but those unemployed now)
  2. Will employers hire and train workers who initially lack skills?
  3. What happens to the worker laid off from a manufacturing job at age 55 —does he get training in new technologies or is he stuck in lower-wage jobs like groundskeeper, security guard, and warehouse stock controller?
  4. How do we make sure that people with disabilities have access to the technologies that facilitate their participation in the workplace?
  5. How will e-commerce impact employment?

To find out more, order your copy of ‘The new rules of engagement for long term employability’ By Diane Shawe

new rules of engagement towards long term employability-Entreployability the new breed by Diane Shawe jan 2014