Tag Archives: online teaching

Outsourcing your knowledge

Albert EinsteinWhy knowing less helps you to do more.

Diane Shawe M.Ed. 

When you think about the power of your brain and how we learn, memorise and recall all those facts, it can get very confusing. Having taught for nearly 25 years and trained some of the brightest professionals over last 10 years, I believe that knowledge is divided in two distinct areas. We can either know about a subject ourselves or we know where we can retrieve information on that subject. The massive amount of information available online has opened an infinite library of easily and quickly retrievable information with simple search engines. I like to think of it as an organic external hard drive, an outsourced memory we can plug in at any time. Some have argued that the internet dilutes the most traditional kind of knowledge: knowing a subject ourselves. They argue that in some way it makes our brains less efficient, diminishing our intelligence and destroying our inner hard drives and memory.

You may remember (if you are of a certain age) that when you were young, you knew by heart the phone number of your closest friends. Since the introduction of digital directories on smartphones there is no longer any reason to memorise numbers by heart.   On the other hand, how many hundreds more contacts do you have now compared to then thanks to the digital directories? In reality, how much more connected are you? The real deal of the information age is not that it allows us to know more, but that it allows us to know less in terms of depth of what we know, as mentioned by David Brooks, a New York Times columnist, in his famous 2006 NY Times article[1] The Outsourced Brain.

neuroscience brain“Memory? I’ve externalised it.” He said, “I am one of those baby boomers who are making this the “It’s on the Tip of My Tongue Decade.” But now I no longer need to have a memory, for I have Google, Yahoo and Wikipedia. Now if I need to know some fact about the world, I tap a few keys and enjoy the vast resource of the external mind.”

I think the positive side of this is that we are free to expand our awareness of subjects we did not have space, or availability, to explore before. Our memory now has a different function: it is a digital index that remembers the existence of a subject and what are the best leads to find information on that subject. I too had thought that the magic of the information age was that it allowed us to know more facts. Then I realised that the magic of the information age is that it allows us to know less.

It provides us with external cognitive servants, silicon memory systems if you will, with collaborative online filters, consumer preference algorithms and networked knowledge. We thus can give these servants the massive raw data and liberate ourselves to think, explore and be creative. You can use your brain to learn new skills, the soft skills that are the true measure of success.

Your outsourced memory (the internet, the cloud and more) allows you to be aware of the existence of information you would never have come across before when you were limited to what your inner memory could hold. It allows you to increase the quantity (and thus the quality) of the information that you can process because you do not always have to worry about memorising every single detail of it. It allows you to use more brain power in linking concepts and applying them rather than remembering them. It empowers you to think and process information faster because your brain has the space to hold links to so much different information, and in doing so it expands your subjective time. Back in the analogue era, the difference between a deep brain and a shallow brain was the availability of information and the choice of whether to take in that information or not came second.

As an educationalist and technophile, combined with my outsourced memory I have the capacity to think deeper. Now that (nearly) everything is available, the power is back to you: it is up to you to take responsibility of what content goes into your mind and how you use your outsourced memory.

Now you have begun to outsource your brain and now have room to do something rather special with your neo-cortex. Enjoy.

 

Is free online courses dumbing down adult education?

Ignorance is not bliss

Ignorance is not bliss

Is free online courses dumbing down adult education?

Adult education has become under-valued in an overpriced educational infrastructure.

The people who need the most help are already systematically ripped off by greedy loan companies, NHS parking, having to pay charges for drawing out their own money from private ATM machines in poorer boroughs, pre-paid electric meter’s to name but a few.  The more you seem to need help the more you seem to have to pay.

Off course the arguments are always about risk, but to compound on top of their needs, a premium, just to make sure the risk is compensated for is questionable indeed.

But another kind of ripping off is taking place. ‘Free online education’ you may ask ‘why is this a rip off?’

I will answer this from my prospective initially and then make further arguments as to why we should be very concerned about this unpoliced, unchallenged butchery of the values originally infused into our adult educational system.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.”

What has happened?  Why have these large institutions priced education out of some fundamental principles?

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area.  Fundamentally, we need to innovate what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an ever changing economy. It is evident that computers can do that for us!

What should a 21st Pedagogy for Adult Education Look Like?

A 21st century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills.

We need to make sure that the type of education can keep a population in work or self-employment, performing meaningful tasks relevant to todays and tomorrow needs within a community.

I believe that education has to become student centric and move away from solely institutional constructs that are not fluid to change.

There has always been a great deal of lip service given to the idea of learning by doing, but not much has been done about it. In fact, John Dewey remarked in 1916, in his book, Democracy and Education:  

“Why is it that, in spite of the fact that teaching by pouring in, learning by passive absorption, are universally condemned, that they are still so entrenched in practice? That education is not an affair of “telling” and being told, but an active constructive process, is a principle almost as generally violated in practice as conceded in theory”


I think it is imperative that this century focuses on Adult Transformative Learning because, if we don’t, we are already seeing the internet unintenionally affect the minds of some of our  impressional adults who have no sence of usefulness within our society and can be easily motivated in learned stimulative blended information that could be perceived as devisive withing many communities.

“Transformative learning is a structured way forward in time of crisis when Individuals face Collective Challenges”

                                                 Diane Shawe M.Ed.

During the last twenty years, the use of the word “crisis” seems to have increased around the world. Referring to sudden and intense political, economic, social, psychological, cultural or environmental changes, this term emerges now more frequently in everyday vocabulary.

According to transformative learning theory, the emergence of a crisis represents a potential opportunity for personal and/ or collective transformation, grounded in the capacity of individuals and groups to revisit the perspectives through which they interpret their own experience.

Considering recent history, how does the emergence of social, economic, political, cultural, intellectual or environmental crisis manifest an opportunity, or an expression, of transformative learning?

In the mean time I think that some of these fundlemental questions need to be addressed:

  • How does the experience of individual or collective crisis affect the way one learns to critically interpret one’s own experiences?
  • What are the learning resources required in order to overcome the experience of individual or collective crisis?
  • What kinds of learning opportunities facilitate the management of personal and collective transformations triggered by a crisis?
  • What are the emerging issues and how do they affect research on transformative learning?

How can we effectively deal with some of these burning question when we are constantly dumbing down Adult education?

If you would like a copy of  my full essay on this topic fill in the form below to request a copy be sent to you.

Traction Alopecia – How You Can Stop It and is it Reversible by Diane Shawe

traction alopecia how to stop itAre YOU a Likely candidate for Traction Alopecia?

Anyone can be affected by traction alopecia – young or old, male or female. It’s more common within certain groups of the population, because they are more likely to use some of the hairstyling techniques listed above.

The reason I raise this article is because we are all living longer and some of the current fashionable trends in the younger groups are contributing to traction alopecia. Read about Clip ins and how they cause Traction Alopecia

For example, women and girls are more likely to notice the problem due to braids and weaves. Ballerinas – who tend to wear their hair pulled into very tight ponytails – sometimes suffer from traction alopecia around the hairline as a result.

In a nutshell – if you have a habit of doing something on a frequent basis that puts your hair under some sort of strain, then you are a candidate for traction alopecia.

Read on to discover the many ways you can prevent it from happening, or stop further damage if you’ve already noticed a problem.

Traction Alopecia Symptoms

Have you ever undone a ponytail and found your scalp feels sensitive to the touch afterwards?

Does untying your hair feel like a relief?

Does your scalp itch after you’ve had braids or a weave put in?

Have you ever taken painkillers because your hair is secured so tightly it’s given you a headache?

All of these are warning signs that your hair is under way too much tension. Your body is trying to tell you something… and you need to listen!

If not, the next thing you’ll notice is that sections of your hair are actually missing, or worryingly sparse. You can often see this more clearly around the hairline or behind the ears, but it can often happen around the crown, too. It really depends on what was causing the tension in the first place.

Some people even notice pustules (blisters filled with pus) or papules (little pimples) where the hair is under a lot of tension. This is because of the irritation being caused to the scalp and is a clear indicator that the follicles just can’t cope with the strain.

Can Traction Alopecia be Reversed?

Yes and no.

If you spot the warning signs of traction alopecia early enough and you put a stop to whatever’s causing it, then your hair will stop falling out and should – with time, patience and loving care – be completely restored to its former glory.

But if the hair follicles have been so badly traumatised for such a long period of time that they have scarred over, then the hair will not grow back by itself. Areas of the scalp where this is the case will likely look shiny.

In cases like this, you’ll need to think about some sort of surgical restoration – speak to your dermatologist to establish whether or not your traction alopecia has caused permanent scarring and to discuss the surgical options available to you.

When Traction Alopecia Compounds Other Hair Loss Problems

traction_alopecia_caused_by_hair_clipin_diane_shawe

If you are wearing a hairpiece – such as a clip on topper – to mask other hair problems like androgenetic alopecia, then you need to be very careful not to compound your problem with traction alopecia!

The best option is to ensure that the clips of your topper are firm, but not too tight, and that you rotate them. We also recommend undoing a couple of the clips when you’re at home – it gives your scalp a little rest from the tension.

Traction Alopecia Recovery Time

Most experts agree that your hair should recover within 6 to 9 months of you removing the cause of the problem.

If you’ve followed the guidelines given here and you are still not seeing regrowth, then it’s likely that the damage to your follicles was permanent – a fact your doctor/dermatologist can confirm. In that case, you might like to discuss the possibility of a hair transplant, which will effectively mask the problem.

What are the Causes of Traction Alopecia?

Traction alopecia is a type of hair loss that happens over time. It’s caused by putting the hair under constant strain or tension and is usually caused by one or more of the following…

  • Very tight ponytails or pigtails
  • Tight braids or cornrows
  • Dreadlocks
  • Extension (single) braids
  • Hair weaves or wigs attached with glue, clips or tape
  • Certain hair clips, slides or barrettes that hold the hair tightly and are worn in the same position every day
  • Headbands – even fabric ones – worn day after day
  • Tight hairpieces
  • Tight headgear like cycling helmets that are worn frequently or for long stretches of time and tend to rub or pull repeatedly on the same area of hair
  • Repeated use of hair rollers
  • Repeated pulling of the hair with the hands (this is an emotional condition called trichotillomania)

If you use or do any of the above, then you may find that the constant tension they cause has led to areas of thinning hair – usually around the temples or behind your ears. Alternatively, you might notice that the part in your hair looks wider than it used to.

If so, then it’s quite likely that you’re suffering from traction alopecia.

There’s more to this condition than hair simply breaking off. Instead, the constant tension in the affected area either pulls out the hairs’ roots completely, or causes the follicles to become inflamed. As time goes by, the damage to the follicles causes them to become atrophied (wasted away)… and if you don’t put a stop to the cause of the problem, they will reach the point where they no longer produce hair at all.

Reference: DermHairClinic – Traction Alopecia

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Get your copy today from amazon.co.uk

Traction Alopecia Treatment

As discussed above, ‘treatment’ for traction alopecia is only effective before you’ve arrived at the stage of permanent damage.

But the good news is that ‘treatment’ – if you’ve caught the condition early enough – can be as simple as changing whatever hair styling and hair care practices you were using and really learning to CARE for this precious asset… your hair!

Wearing a weave

One of the biggest ironies about traction alopecia is that it’s the most common cause of hair loss for women wearing hair extension is due to the application being too tight when weaves and hairpieces are applied… yet those weaves and hairpieces are often used in the first place to enhance hair that may seem thin, or lacking in volume.

Weaves are generally applied through braiding, fusion, netting or bonding – and the sad fact is that any or all of these methods can lead to traction alopecia if used extensively, over long periods of time.

To minimize the risk of traction alopecia, or to try to prevent further damage and encourage regrowth, have your weave fitted by a state licensed professional. Yes, it may be more expensive, but you – and your hair – are worth it! Someone properly trained in hair care will keep damage to a minimum and will be able to spot potential problems and nip them in the bud.

The same goes for hair extensions, which can also cause hair loss problems in the lower half of the scalp. Have them fitted by a trained professional – don’t try to fit them yourself or have a friend do them for you.

Speak to your hairdresser about taking care of your scalp – some women find it difficult to maintain good scalp hygiene because the weave or extensions make it awkward… unfortunately, though, this can make the problem of traction alopecia worse.

When chemicals are the culprits

There’s a kind of alopecia called CCCA (central cicatricial centrifugal alopecia), also known as hot comb alopecia, or follicular degeneration syndrome. It’s almost exclusively seen in African American women and it’s often confused with female pattern baldness, because it starts at the crown and spreads to the surrounding areas.

The cause?

A mixture of too much stress (traction) on the hair along with the use of harsh chemicals like dyes, relaxers and bleaches. The chemicals actually damage the keratin structure of the follicle itself, causing hair LOSS, not just hair damage.

In fact, research conducted in 2008 showed that the highest prevalence of traction alopecia was in women with relaxed hair.

If you suspect this is a condition that’s affecting you, speak to your dermatologist. In addition to removing the cause of the traction and stopping the use of chemicals in your hair, you may be tested for any bacterial or viral infection and possibly be prescribed topical steroids, antibiotics or topical minoxidil to encourage regrowth.

NOTE: If you must use a relaxer on your hair, have it done professionally. Specialists are seeing more and more problems caused by home relaxer kits, because it’s tempting to leave the chemicals on longer than necessary, or accidentally use a stronger formula than you really need. (Make sure they have been certified)

Braiding, ponytails, pigtails and locs

The 2008 research into the prevalence of traction alopecia in African girls and women showed that braiding caused more problems than chemicals (although the two together were worse still).

Starting up a hair extension business Diane ShaweConstant, tight braiding – or other styles like ponytails that place hair under chronic tension – can affect any ethnic group. So it’s very important to take a new approach to styling hair that doesn’t rely on placing the hair under extreme tension.

The ideal solution, of course, is to allow the hair to be completely natural, without using any kind of clips, slides or ties.

The reality, though, is that this just isn’t possible for most of us. Our hair may either be unmanageable and wild looking when allowed to ‘do its own thing’ – or, like us, you may live in a climate where it’s simply too hot to have your hair hanging around your face all day.

The answer is that you can continue to secure back your hair, but you MUST change the way you do it from one week to the next. Traction alopecia is usually the result of CONTINUALLY putting the hair under EXACTLY the same tension in the same place, day after day.

How to Avoid Traction Alopecia (and still have beautiful hair!)

Change the location of your ponytail often – wear it high, low, on one side, then the other. Don’t wear a ponytail at all if your hair isn’t really long enough to need one… otherwise you’ll probably be pulling your too-short hair really hard in order to secure it.

Avoid using clipped in ponytails – the weight of them can – quite literally – tear out your hair.

Always use fabric covered hair bands – avoid bare rubber bands like the plague! And remove bands, clips and ponytail holders from the hair at night – this is when you may be putting your hair under tension without even realizing it.

Invest in satin pillowcases. They cause less friction on your hair than cotton or nylon ones – and, as an added bonus, they’re believed to help reduce wrinkles too!

Change the location of your partas often as you can. Even a simple part in the hair can trigger a problem when worn in the same position day after day.

Don’t retwist the roots of dreadlocks – watch this video for first-hand experience of how damaging this can be!

If you use hairspray or hair gel, wash it out before you next brush your hair.Brushing dried hairspray and gels out of your hair is damaging to the shaft and may cause further hair loss.

Make sure your hair is hydrated. If you’re in a dry climate – or you use air conditioning or central heating – the lack of moisture in the air can make your hair brittle and more likely to break

Other related Hair Loss Article by Diane Shawe

Bad habits that damage Hair Extensions by Diane Shawe

BAD HABITS THAT DO YOUR HAIR AND HAIR EXTENSIONS MORE HARM THAN GOOD

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

There are common habits we knowing do that damages our hair. For instance like using a flat iron at the highest possible tempreture that will surely harm your hair.

Less common however is ponytails, super tight buns or braids, the sun, birth control pills, hair extension glues and hair extension clips and micro rings made from Nickel.

Let’s first talk about using flat irons or curling irons. These man-made styling equipment are very drying to hair extensions and not to mention, harmful too hair. This is because the temperature and heat in the irons are to unreasonably hot for the hair so you end up cooking your delicate hair whilst drying it out at the same time.

using hot iron damages hair extensionsHair ironing will damage the state of your already process hair extensions. It does not just dry the hair from head to tip, it makes your hair become frizzy and hard to manage especially if the hair is blended you end up melting the synthetic bonded in with the real hair which become crinkly. Once hair extension becomes too damaged, it is very hard to rejuvenate them back as they were already ‘dead hair’.

Trimming or cutting the damaged hair will work, but then you end up losing the length of your hair extension which would have cost you a lot of money to install in the first place. Doing hair treatments is crucial to hydrating the hair.  Hair treatments such as oil treatments are good for your natural hair but can end up making hair extensions heavy, clumpy and then eventually matting by themselves.

Hair extension Clip-in can also damage your hair if left in for over 5 hours a day

Diet also plays a role in the health of your hair too. Eating too much food that has little or no beneficial nutrition to your hair will cause your hair to be brittle and weak. Foods with good source of omega-3 is good for your hair whilst your hair extensions require a good non oil based leave in conditioner twice a day to keep it hydrated.

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Pick up a a copy today from Amazon

Getting started in the Hair Extension business

If you want to find out more about becoming a hair extension consultant, hair loss consultant or hair extension trainer, download our course prospectus for more information about the Hair extension training academy.

 

THE THREE REASONS COMPANY STORIES FALL SHORT OF EXPECTATIONS

Develop your interviewing skills

Develop your interviewing skills

The company story is a composite of how you represent yourself to employees, supplier, customers, and the general public.

It is tied closely to your reputation, reinforced by your integrity, and defined by your behavior. Your story is the essence of who you are, what you believe in, and how you act out your character in a business play. Think of your story as if it were presented in a theater. Your story can be a comedy, a tragedy, or a musical. There will be a cast of characters, some good, others not so good, each telling their own version of the story.

article by Diane Shawe

Most organisations are in trouble because their main characters in the play, the managers or owners, tell stories that don’t  hang  together. Three problems are associated with their composite company story. First, the story is badly told; second, it is not acted out in a coherent manner; and third, it doesn’t ring true. The sales department is living one story while operations follows a different theme. Finance has its own world while marketing occupies still another cloud. Is it any wonder employees are confused? They seem to be working for different companies simultaneously.

When a Story Is Badly Told

A badly told story has its roots in an incomplete business plan. Most organisations have bits and pieces of the items making up the plan. Managers are usually proud they have a philosophy statement posted in the lobby. They point in triumph to the value statements listed in the company literature. Somewhere you will be shown a vision. Each of these elements is appropriate and necessary in both a well-constructed business plan and an authentic story.

If a single element is missing from the plan, the story is incomplete. The danger of an incomplete story is evidenced when the flaws show up in execution of the plan. An incomplete business plan results in a frag- ile document presenting a story that doesn’t ring true. An incomplete model implodes.

When there is no vision statement for instance in a story. any well-written plan with all the pieces will not stack up if the vision portion is lacking.

Time management Mindfeed 4 by Diane ShaweWhen the Story Pieces Don’t Add Up

Failure to virtually linked to the elements  also contributes to an incomplete story. Because the parts and pieces are not interconnected there is no coordinated, disciplined implementation. It is possible to actually have the elements working against each other. For example, values may contradict the philosophy. The vision and mission could be disconnected. Principles could be developed that cancel each other. These disconnected behaviors cause customers and employees to hold the company management suspect. They sense something is not right or it is just not working.

When the Story Isn’t Believable

Another equally fatal flaw in telling a story is to be incongruent. For example, you claim to love customers then treat them badly. You claim to value employees yet they become targets of opportunity for reengineering or down sizing, even in good times. You profess to provide the best products in your industry yet they don’t work as advertised.

People are astute and getting smarter especially with the powerful smartphone in the palm of their hands. They pick up on the fact you don’t live your own company hype. Your story simply isn’t believable. Consider public awareness of a company’s environmental protection position. Let one incident occur then watch the media have a field day with the inconsistencies. Politicians suffer the same fate when they make public promises they cannot keep. They become inconsistent with their story, telling each special interest group what the group needs to hear.

The Antidote to a Badly Managed Story

There is an antidote for a badly managed story. The key is building a congruent story by eliminating the very issues that create incon- gruence. The first step is to get a business plan in place. To do it as defined in this text, you will be forced to deal with the key planning elements as discrete elements and then again as an integrated framework. This is the only known process to make the message authentic, congruent, and believable.

Being authentic requires truth and hard work. It requires an acknowledgment of who you really are in terms of what you believe in, how you behave, and what you expect. If yours is a lethargic organisation, don’t claim high performance. Being authentic means identifying all the problems in your system, communicating to employees that you know the problems, and finally telling them how you intend to fix those problems. Everyone must share this hard work across the range of business activities and down the management structure. Everyone must participate in careful organisational analysis and the required actions to fix the problems.

Being congruent requires constant vigilance on the part of the whole management team. This means you must do what you say— every single time. There are situations where you will slip. Honest mistakes are okay. Employees do not expect their management to be perfect. They do expect them to live up to their word and match word and deed.

Reaching a state where you and your management team are believed is a journey with history working against you. A mis management example made public doesn’t help your case. Building trust to counter this history is not an overnight event. After your story is completed, communicated, and demonstrated you will experience hesitance and resistance from employees. They won’t be quick to jump on your train. There will be a test period to see if you really meant what you said or if this was simply an annual pep talk from upper management. Remember two points: Employees have heard it all before, and actions speak louder than words.

10 Tips for Becoming a Social Media Influencer by Diane Shawe

10 tips on becoming social media influencer by Diane ShaweAre you trying to become a social media influencer?

article by:

CEO at AVPT Ltd. Business Growth Training Provider & CPD Approved by SRA. Startup Loan Mentor

To be considered an influencer, people need to see you as a resource. Consider your audience and share content that they’ll find useful. Post original articles, plus posts from other trusted sources.

Publishing on social media is a great way to share expert knowledge and develop your influencer status.

In this article I’ll share ten tips that can help you become a social media influencer.

Discover ten tips for becoming a social media influencer.

1: Focus on one area and one specialism

To become an influencer, master a specific topic within your niche. If you cast your net too wide, it will be difficult to gain the level of knowledge necessary to be considered an expert.

If your goal is to be an expert in the digital space and become known as an influencer, there are plenty of things you can do to raise your profile. Develop your expertise and use social media to raise yourself to influencer status. To help you find your focus here are some points to consider.

What do you think?
What is your niche?
What platforms get the most engagement?
How have you developed your reputation as an influencer?
In what ways will you engaged your audience and shared your expertise

Either focus on one social media industry such as social media marketing or public relations, or on a single platform like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest or Instagram. The Vine is also good for short video clips from your Youtube account.

1: Master one topic to become a true expert.

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Start small and learn as much as you can about your desired niche through research and experimentation. That way, you’ll be able to discover the ins and outs of your specialty and form your own ideas, as opposed to simply restating others’ opinions. This is a very important step on your way to influencer status.

Oh and try not to drill down too much in your articles, more and more people access using a mobile device so think about what you would want to see if it was you reading someone else’s blog.

2: Subscribe to Platform Blogs

Social media is unique because it is in constant flux. Stay on top of the latest platform updates, such as algorithm changes, new analytics and added features, as they can drastically change a social channel and the way it’s navigated.

Whether you want to be viewed as the authority on a social channel or a broader industry, read platform blogs regularly: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Instagram. There’s no better way to keep tabs on any social media channel.

3: Familiarise and Read Relevant Blogs Daily

In addition to platform blogs, read other information outlets to gain valuable insights into your niche. Study news, expert opinions and case studies that are published or shared by people you trust.

Makes subscribing to and reading multiple blogs easy.

By using a tool like Feedly to subscribe to a variety of relevant industry blogs, you will benefit from different viewpoints and helpful advice.

4: Do you use your Alert Settings?

Reading press releases, news alerts and relevant posts is key to staying informed. When you know what’s happening, you can keep your followers in the know.

Since it is impossible to keep track of all of the information from platform blogs and your favourite outlets, invest time into creating alerts directly related to your specialism. A couple of tools that make it easy to stay on top of relevant news are Google Alerts and Social Mention.

5: Populate Your Blog

There is nothing worse than a blog that is several weeks out of date! Write blog posts and publish consistently. You should shoot to publish at least two to three times each week.

To stay on track, create an editorial calendar and stick to it.

Partner with other influencers and reblog them. Interview them, (over the phone, on skype or send them 5 questions to answer. Invite them to contribute to your blog or run a promotion together that gets shared on everyone’s sites.

6: Publish on LinkedIn

In addition to your own blog, re-create your posts on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. Cut and paste your previously published blog posts and add a headline, image and keywords. (I hope you have a linkedin account)

Remember, people generally assume LinkedIn posts are only from the most influential thought leaders. Now, when people in your network and beyond see your articles on LinkedIn, it is likely they will view you as an authority too.

Share your knowledge and get noticed by publishing on LinkedIn.

Through its publishing platform, LinkedIn has created a prime opportunity for influencers to get noticed.

7: Use Sharing tools to share Valuable Content

I repeat again, share content. Once you’ve determined your focus and have implemented a system for keeping on top of the latest news and information within your niche, start sharing high-value influencer content with your audience via social media.

8: Seek out and Contribute to Other Sites

One of the quickest ways to gain influencer status is to contribute your unique content to other blogs and publications. Guest posting increases your visibility, bolsters your credibility and increases traffic to your own blog.

After your content is published, let people in your network know. Tweet a link, share it on Facebook, tell your other online communities and add it to your LinkedIn profile publications. Dare I say it but +google plus is fast becoming a really influential content showcase. Have you got your account set up yet?

9: Be Seen Engaging Online

To be an influencer, you need to be seen and also be engaging. Social media influencers regularly take part in relevant conversations across a variety of networks. Attend and participate in Twitter chats and webinars (and host Twitter chats too), answer questions on Quora and share ideas in LinkedIn groups. Be constructive and you don’t always have to be controversial for the sake of it.

10: Safeguard your Reputation

This area is not often looked at, getting misquoted, having the wrong type of media attached to your blog can often flag up in the search engine above all of your positive content.

Make sure you sign up to a online reputation notify. They are good because they sweep the internet each week and give you a report on any new content found linked to you or uploaded by you. I use www.naymz.com It’s worth becoming a premium user.

Sharing your knowledge is how you’ll truly stand out as an influencer.

How can we help?

We have a Social Media Course that you might find very beneficial. Visit www.shortcourses.expert or give us a call and we will send you the course outline. 0208 1333120

Daily mindfeeds will help you discover the truth behind every single choice you make as a human being!

“ Daily miTime management Mindfeed 4 by Diane Shawendfeeds can help develop your Awareness based on Facts Which Can Have Amazing Benefits For Your Life And Success!”

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

From low to high, every day and each week we experience several degrees of emotions such as: embarrassment, disgrace, feeling guilty, apathy, sorrow, dread, want, anger, pride, bravery, disinterest, willingness, acceptance, understanding, love, delight, peace, enlightenment.

Altho we  jump in and out of different emotions throughout each week, generally there’s a prevailing “normal” state that we live in or preceive it to be normal.

The truth is:

If You Want To Skyrocket Your Success With Business And Improve Your Overall Life…You Need To Have A Look At You Daily Mindfeed!

Why do most people have a tendency to not achieve the success they desire or deserve in their business and overall life?

well there is a saying “Garbage in, Garbage Stays!”

Which brings us to the next important aspect here:

You Can Have Better Success In Business And Life If  You Put Some Energy Into Your Daily Mindfeed!

People who struggle in business and life will find these things in common:

They don’t know Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and how it fits into their own daily life.
They have no idea how to handle failure and guilt
They are living in flight mode instead of Fight Mode
They also don’t understand the anatomy of Fear

 

Stress Management Strategies Mindfeed 6 by Diane ShaweWhat did Abraham Maslow Hypothesis

 

Psychologist Abraham Maslow first introduced his concept of a hierarchy of needs in his 1943 paper “A Theory of Human Motivation”1 and his subsequent book, Motivation and Personality.2 This hierarchy proposes that individuals are motivated to fulfill basic needs before moving on to extra needs.

Maslow thought that these needs are like instincts and play a major role in motivating conduct.  I am not going to set out each need but concentrate on one in partcular.

Why is Self- Actualising Needs Important?

This is the highest level of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Self-actualising individuals are self-conscious, concerned with personal growth, less worried with the opinions of other people and interested in satisfying their potential  WHY.

Daily constructive Mindfeed can often be viewed as the mental and spiritual ingestion needed to perpetuate self awareness, happiness and success.

80% students get qualified sothey can get a job, promotion or start a business

 

 

 

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If all the unemployed formed a country it would be the fifth largest in the world. Why does this matter?

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

Why the grip held by outdated educational institutions based on historical prestige needs to take a back seat and become student centric!

Article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

If we hadn’t had the most recent global economical crisis and the unrest in certain war torn regions had not occurred, there might have been 62 million more jobs in the world today, according to the International Labor Organisation as it is, there are over 200 million people looking for work across the globe.

To add to our worries: 75 million of these are young people, eager to take that first firm foothold in the ladder of success. We cannot allow them to become a “lost” generation.

The Great Recession has been particularly hard on older workers also, who have had difficulty finding new jobs after being unemployed for long spells. This is especially troubling because of their pressing needs for health care and retirement preparation.

It is also doubtful that the long-term unemployed are going to become more effective jobseekers simply by being forced to visit a Job centre daily if indeed they have a job centre in some parts of the world. But I am going to site that back in 1996, when the Jobseeker’s Allowance was introduced, the requirement to visit a Job centre every two weeks and provide detailed evidence of active job search did not raise overall job search effort among the unemployed.

If explicit job search requirements were not effective in a period of rapidly growing labour demand and falling unemployment, there is no good reason to expect them to be effective in the aftermath of a severe recession and one cannot certainly make a claim to recovery based on one geographical location sprinkled with opportunities driven by technology and property prices.

So clearly, jobs must be a preeminent priority in the years ahead. The major test of the new technological era is simple: can it provide decent livelihoods for all people?

Technology and rising inequality feeds into a broader concern: Technological advance creates a small cohort of big winners, leaving everybody else behind.

Certainly, those with the lowest skills are having the toughest time in today’s economy.

And yet, we also need to discuss what kind of growth this “right track” leads to. Will it be solid, sustainable, and balanced—or will it be fragile, erratic, and unbalanced?

To answer this question, we need to look at the patterns of economic activity in the years ahead, and especially the role of education, technology and innovation in driving us forward.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said: “No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.” Isaac Asimov

So I have chosen a big topic and what I want to address in my blog today, in the form of three questions:

1. First, what does this new technological era mean for the economy, especially for jobs?

2. Second, how does it relate to one of the scourges of our age—rising inequality?

3. Third, what about some solutions, including vocational education and what I refer to as the growing need to foster a new thinking around “Entreployability”

The Interlinkages between Technology and the economy

Innovation is pushing ahead at warp speed. We are certainly living through one of the most exciting periods in human history. The pace of change is so fast that even the technology of five years ago seems prehistoric.

Those of you who are students probably do not even remember a time when phones were not smart, when cameras contained film, when texts meant school books, and when wireless was a word used for old-fashioned radio!

This advance is centered on the rise of a global digital network—the “hyperconnected world”—combined with the rise of genuine machine intelligence. Today’s smart phones are more powerful than yesterday’s supercomputers. We see cars driving themselves, printers making complicated three-dimensional parts, and robots doing the most complex tasks. “Science fiction” is rapidly becoming “science fact”.

What does this all mean for our lives and livelihoods, for our common economic future?

If the previous revolutions were about using machines for brawn, this is about using machines for brains. And since technology is powering a giant leap in global interconnectivity, these are “connected” brains! Just look at some of the trends.

Certainly, we can see some worrying trends. For a start, the effects of new machine technology are not showing up in productivity statistics—at least not yet—and productivity is by far the most important driver of long-term economic growth.

Now I am not an expert on the Economy, but we are all touched by it and using common sense I for one can see that there is a looming problem. For instance one of the biggest worries is how technological innovation affects jobs put simply will machines leave even more workers behind?

You may not want to give this a second glance but even seasoned professionals can find themselves cast adrift on an unfamiliar ocean.

Rising inequality

My second point about rising inequalities is going to be brief. But here’s a little statistic for you to consider. According to Oxfam, almost half the world’s wealth is owned by one percent of the population and, stunningly, the bottom half of the world’s population owns the same as the richest 85 people in the world.

What is causing such a convulsion in the distribution of income? There is no single factor here, although it seems clear that technology is one of the major factors—it can create huge rewards for the extraordinary visionaries at the top, and huge anxieties for the ordinary workers at the bottom. The speed at which information is sent around the world means that the average disgruntled people who make up the 5 largest country can amplify unrest as they all voice their fears to the small percentage of the world wealth holders.

What about some solutions?

So finally what is the purpose of education in today’s 21 Century, I quote Jane Stanford of Standford University — “with a “spirit of equality”. One of her goals for the university was “to resist the tendency to the stratification of society, by keeping open an avenue whereby the deserving and exceptional may rise through their own efforts from the lowest to the highest stations in life”.

What has happened? Why have these large institutions priced education out of these fundamental principles?

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our humanity? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people?

It is clear that at the moment Educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material. It is evident that computers can do that for us! A 21st century educational system must focus on the areas where humans can outclass computers—such as in cognitive skills, interpersonal skills, fine motor skills, or sophisticated coding skills. Maybe we need to remind ourselves of the purpose of education and vocational education. I summarise in my words the following:

The purpose of education

The first and foremost purpose of education is to educate and give everyone equal opportunity as a means to succeed in life. Education is a way of igniting and enlightening the thought of an individual.

It should help learners to discriminate between knowledge and ignorance, help to create a spark and create the sense of realisation with logic and a way to reason why the other things are illogical.

The purpose of vocational education

Every man must have a vocation – a trade, a business, or a profession – (if they are able too) in order to earn his livelihood so that they can support themselves, their family and people who cannot help themselves in our society. There are institutions for imparting various types of specialised training to help people qualify for this. The specialist is in demand everywhere, – in the office as well as in factories, in educational institutions and governments.

Conclusion.

The traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility.

With the population dramatically ageing and low-level jobs increasingly swallowed up by machinery, entrepreneurship will be a necessity for many, rather than a life-style choice for some.

SMEs are of course already leading this charge but in order to gear up for the future we need to start off by asking a serious question, defining criteria’s, and examining trends, impact these trends will have and plan a way to jointly prepare current and future generations to be both employable and entrepreneurial.

We are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. And we are entering the new century with opportunity on our side but huge problems that require new thinking.

The Question we should all ask ourselves?

Do you think you have another 20 – 30 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Do you think you have another 30 – 50 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Do you think you have another 50 – 70 years to live Yes [ ] No [ ]

Have you considered what you are going to do for the next 40- 70 years?

What will the job market look like in the next 20 years?

What will you be able to do to solve your problem which could be unemployment and patchy income streams?

What will you be able to do that will solve someone’s problem for which they will pay you a fee?

If computers might even replace our intelligence, they can never replace the capacities that make us truly human: our creativity and innovation, our passion.

So education must be the bridge between the present and future, the old and the new. But we must also build an enduring platform. By that I mean a new way of thinking about the global economy—the “new ©Entreployability the way forward.

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This is helping an individual to develop their ‘©Entreployability assets’ which comprise of their knowledge (i.e. what they know), skills (what they do with what they know) and attitudes (how they do it).

To help them keep busy or at work; engaging their skills and attentions to employ themselves independently and maintain work.

To help them organise and manages their own business, contracts or employability.

To help them be available to be hired, provide them with a safe platform to encourage them to supply soft or hard skill for solving problems or being of service for which they will be paid by another party.

Making sure that the skill they have can be updated to help support them firstly, their family and community and economy.

Why employers and training organisations need to take heed of this global trend

Diane Shawe CEO AVPT

Diane Shawe CEO

The Changing face of Skills and Training

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed CEO

In a report conducted by Kelly Global Workforce Index in 2013 over 120,000 respondents from 31 countries across the Americas, EMEA an APAC regions where asked several questions about Skills and Training.

When asked to identify the main motivation for earning new skills or undertaking training, the largest share of employees 57% cited the opportunity for promotion with their current employer. A further 47% cited the opportunity to work in another organisation, and 42% planned to enter a new field of work.

Globally, 60% of worker are either actively seeking further education or training (23%) or considering it (37%).  The APAC region stands out as a skilling hotspot, with 69% of those surveyed either considered or seeking further training for a new field.

Across the globe, there are markedly different approaches to the notion of additional training and professional development. The highest rates of planned upskilling are predominantly in developing economies, while the lowest rates tend to be in some of the most prosperous nations.

Russia heads the list for training intensity, with an astonishing 92% planning some form of training. Also high on the list are Thailand, Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, Puerto Rico and Malaysia.

Surprisingly the lowest rates of planned training are in France, Luxembourg, the US and Switzerland.

Among professional and technical employees, those most likely to be actively seeking to upgrade their skills are in Math, Engineering and IT, while the least likely are in Science, Health Care and Education.

Investing in Training that Works

For training to be meaningful it needs to be relevant and practical – not “training for training sake”.

When asked to identify the mot desirable means of furhering their skills, the overwhelming preference was for on-the-job experience and training, identified by 70% of respondents, significantly ahead of the next hightest ranked “continued education and training” cited by 58%

Building a durable Skills base

The last two decades have radically altered the way skill are acquired and developed. Skill are no longer “front-end loaded” onto a career. Rather they are increasingly embedded as part of lifelong learning and development.

The upgrading and renewal of skills plays a critical role in personal and professional development. It also has a vital role in broader workforce development, which is the cornerstone of organisational efficiency and productivity.

All skills have a finite life, and in industries subject to high rates of technological change and innovation, the lifespan of skills is becoming shorter. Increasingly, new skills will need to be learned and deployed throughout a working life.

It is clear that decisions about training and professional development are now an integral part of the employment equation, and have an important bearing on employee moral, performance and retention.

What Employers can do

  • Consider opportunities for training and personal development.
  • Help to build a culture of continuous learning so that employees are encouraged to develop and use new skills
  • Encourage employees to think about career plans and the type of skills and training they need to stay equipped.
  • Consider training as a key element in employee attraction and retention.
  • Champion individuals who have devoted time to upskilling so they can become ambassadors for an organisation.

The landscape has changed

The scale and duration of the downturn has forced may employees to look afresh at the whole area of training and professional development – one that was previously guided by employers.  Employees now recognise that they cannot solely rely on an employer to direct in this important element of their lives.

A new generation of workers is taking on much greater responsibility for their training and professional development, including the way it is provided and funded.

The global economic shock-waves have unleashed a new orthodoxy and a unforeseen outcomes has a new generation of employees are more independent, globally focused and adaptive.  The new challenges for global employers is to understand why the landscape has changed and prudently look beyond the present and where the best skilled workforce will be and what work will look like in 10 or 15 years.

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses

 

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