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10 Essential Questions For Managing & Controling The Conversation And Advancing The Sale Toward Your Close by Diane Shawe

It can be challenging at the best of times to understand what your prospect wants in order to tailor your product or services to their needs.

The secret is that once a client’s needs are understood and a relationship is established, asking for business becomes an extension of the roles of counselor and problem-solver possibly a familiar and comfortable roles for business entrepreneurs.

With these 10 questions firmly in place, practice them so that asking for business may not be so daunting. Use these questions to bring the focus of the sales conversation back to YOUR goals

Diane Shawe copy of ebook from coffee break series1. “Let Them Know You Are Listening”

Repeat back what your customer has said. Make sure you show youare listening to their EMOTIONS as well as their words and logic.

So what I hear you saying is that you are a little bit _______?

Tell me more about that feeling. OK, what do you think we could do about that?

2. “Get Their Opinion”

Everybody loves to think that their opinion is valued. By getting prospect’s opinion you find out what they are most interested in, and more importantly you will learn what NOT to discuss or emphasize

In your opinion, does this idea fit the goals of your company?

Why or why not?

3. “Narrow It Down”

Sometimes customers will get confused by too many options. If you can narrow down their decision to fewer choices, then they are less likely to put off a buying decision.

If I was a magician and I could just magically give you the perfect package of your choice, which one would it be?

4. “Show Optimism”

Try to get a positive response from your customer. Optimistic suggestions and questions will usually get optimistic responses

I am sure that you won’t mind me downloading this product detail sheet, would you? …

If you knew it would help you to make a better decision about which model is right for you?

5. “Be Negative To Elicit A Positive Response”

Predict a negative outcome in order to give your customers a chance to help you, or give you more information.

If you predict a negative outcome, your customers may even offer up solutions that would not have thought of otherwise.

You’re not interested in our free bonuses, are you?

6. “Super Polite Flattery Favors”

Be polite, and people will respond. Add a little flattery and then don’t be afraid to ask a favour I know your job is super complicated and you have a lot on your plate right now.

Instead of having to deal with selling your boss on this idea,

how about you just let me to the heavy lifting?

7. “Get Them Talking Again”

Keep the conversation going to avoid “uncomfortable silences.” Bring them back around, and keep them talking.

What exactly do you mean by that?

That’s really very, very interesting.

Would you mind telling me more?

8. “Brain stormers”

Get your prospect to think about the rewards and benefits of using or owning your product or service. Get them to think about various possibilities.

Get them to think creatively.

Have you thought about how easy this will be, and how much time this will save you once you get it going?

Just imagine all that extra time you’ll have to focus on what’s important!

Imagine what could you do with that extra time?

Let’s make a quick list

9. “Take Their Temperature”

Find out exactly how they feel – both positive and negative. This will obviously give you more information on which benefits to pitch, and how to close the sale.

Q The way you see it, in what different ways are we BETTER than the competition?

In what ways do you think we are WEAKER?

10. “Focus on identifying and solving their problems”

Find out exactly what they are concerned about which stimulated them to enquire about your services or product further. This will give yyou more information and better help you to tailor your proposal an quotation.

Q How did you see this product or service solving your main concerns

Or

Q what main concerns did you see our services or product solving?

Bargaining vs Negotiating

Although people often think that negotiating is the same as bargaining, it is not.

Negotiating is a process, and bargaining is one stage of that process. There are three other stages of negotiating, and even those are tempered by timing, intuition, and flexibility to the process.

I am not going to list all of the, but I will set out some of the real nuggets you should put in place to establish a firm ground for all considerations.

1. Do your Research

When doing research and preparing for negotiations, there are three important considerations:

  • Collecting facts
  • Knowing priorities
  • Knowing principles

The facts that you collect are all the direct and indirect information that you will need to back you up during negotiations. With access to information today, it is a much simpler task than ever to accumulate all kinds of data and statistics.

For example, if you are preparing to purchase a vehicle or a house, plenty of information is available, such as comparable properties and prices.If you are preparing to negotiate a raise, or are negotiating salary increases at work, then comparable wage statistics, the history of the organisation and its mission and values, previous experiences in the collective bargaining process, and strategic plans are all important concepts to understand.

2. Focus on your priority

Knowing priorities means having a good understanding of what you want from the negotiation. You also need to know what the other party wants. Understanding your principles, both as a negotiator
and as an individual, will help you to form and present a case that is compelling and believable.

Understanding the principles of the other party can also be very helpful to you. A little more research can help you to understand what the organisation’s beliefs are, how they have approached previous negotiations, what terms seem to be more important to them than others, and what terms they could be willing to be flexible with.

3. Identifying Your Walk Away Position (WAP)

When you establish your priorities, make sure you have a clear understanding of your Walk Away Position (WAP). What is the least that you will accept (or the highest price that you are willing to
pay)?

Establish your WAP value in your mind and keep it clearly available so that you do not get caught up in the heat of negotiating, either ending up with something you never wanted, or turning
down a deal that was better than your WAP.

If you are negotiating on someone else’s behalf, make sure that you know their WAP so that you do not make any mistakes in negotiating for them.

4. Identifying Your Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (BATNA)

In addition to your WAP, you also need a Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (BATNA) in your plan. Sometimes an issue can be settled before the bargaining phase begins if it meets your
criteria as a BATNA.

For example, if you are planning to purchase a home – which is often a very emotional decision – and the realtor comes to you with an offer that you can live with, and you get the home you want without having to participate in any heavy bargaining or entering into a price war, then you may have reached your BATNA.

Not all negotiations have to be bargained; sometimes, when you negotiate, you can lose the opportunity to get what might have been a BATNA if you had not been after such a bargain.

5. Working Within the Zone of Possible Agreement (ZOPA)

The Zone of Possible Agreement (ZOPA) is an area of overlap where the desired outcomes of both parties reside, and where both parties can live with the outcome. Once you reach a ZOPA, the finer details need to be worked out within the scope of what both parties
have already found is potentially working for them.

For example, if your business forecasting allows for a 2% salary increase each year for the next three years, and similar companies in your industry are offering the same, and the union is asking for 7% over four years, then youmay be within the ZOPA.In general, there are three possible outcomes to a negotiation.

  • Lose-Lose
  • Win-Lose
  • Win-Win

6. Getting Everyone’s Perspective

Gathering perspective is something that can take place throughout the negotiation process. It begins in the research phase, where the negotiator considers the needs of the members of an organisation
in conjunction with the strategic vision and mission of the negotiation.

This does not mean that everyone will get what they want in an agreement; rather, it means that all points of view are considered. There is no point in entering negotiations and reaching an agreement that ignores a section of stakeholders or breaks the law.

Gathering perspective can be a considerable undertaking, depending on the size and scope of the operation. This is one area where outside resources can be utilised (an outside firm conducting employee satisfaction surveys, for example)Diane Shawe Author available from amazon and google books

10 Traits That Help Kill a Potential Sale by Diane Shawe

Learn to develop positive communication style

Learn to develop positive communication style

Here are 10 tips on how not to leave 10 Strong worst impressions.

Article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

1. Not knowing your Audience

Trying to sell something to someone that you don’t really know, you don’t know if there is a need or indeed if they have already got what you are selling will kill a potential sale or recommendation.

Persuasive people know their audience inside and out, and they use this knowledge to speak their audience’s language. Everyone is different, and catching on to these subtleties goes a long way toward getting them to hear your point of view.

2. Not getting Connected

The person you are speaking with is a person, not an opponent or a target. No matter how compelling your argument, if you fail to connect on a personal level, he or she will doubt everything you say.

People are much more likely to accept what you have to say once they have a sense of what kind of person you are.

Note: In a negotiation study, Stanford students were asked to reach agreement in class. Without instruction of any kind, 55% of the students successfully reached agreement. However, when students were instructed to introduce themselves and share their background before attempting to reach agreement, 90% of the students did so successfully.

3. Being Pushy

If you tend to come across as too aggressive, don’t be impatient and overly persistent. Pushy people are a huge turn off. The in-your-face approach starts the recipient back pedalling, and before long, they’re running for the hills.

Persuasive people establish their ideas assertively and confidently, without being aggressive or pushy. Focus on being confident but calm. Persuasive people don’t ask for much, and they don’t argue vehemently for their position because they know that subtlety is what wins people over in the long run. Know that if your idea is really a good one, people will catch on if you give them time. If you don’t, they won’t catch on at all.

4. Being Mousy

Constantly seeking approval because you present your ideas as questions or as though they need approval. Using phrases like “I think” or “It is possible that.” makes them seem flawed and unconvincing.

If you tend to be shy, focus on presenting your ideas as statements and interesting facts for the other party to mull over. Also, remove qualifiers from your speech. When you are trying to be persuasive.

5. Negative Body Language

Being unaware of your body movements, posture and gestures can send out the wrong messages.

Get your mindfeed copy today. Available from Amazon

Becoming conscious of your gestures, facial expressions, and tone of voice (and making certain they’re positive) will engage people and open them up to your arguments

6. Sounding unclear and vague

It is not impressive to use phrases such as ‘A little bit of this and that’ when asked what you do.

Persuasive people are able to communicate their ideas quickly and clearly. When you have a firm grasp on what you’re talking about, it’s fun and easy to explain it to those who don’t understand. A good strategy here is to know your subject so well that you could explain it to a child.

7Not coming across as Genuine

Some of the above points could have the result of making you come across and not being genuine. Being genuine and honest is essential to being persuasive. No one likes a fake. People gravitate toward those who are genuine because they know they can trust them. When was the last time you met someone you did not think was genuine and a) welcomed them with opened arms b) had something positive to say about them?

Persuasive people know who they are. They are confident enough to be comfortable in their own skin. By concentrating on what drives you and makes you happy as an individual, you become a much more interesting and persuasive person than if you attempt to win people over by trying to be the characteristics of what is trending on twitter.

8. Not acknowledging that others have a Point of View

Stubbornly sticking to your point of view will demonstrate that you might not be a active listener. An extremely powerful tactic of persuasion is to concede the point. Admit that your argument is not perfect. This shows that you are open minded and willing to make adjustments. You want your audience to know that you have their best interests at heart. Try using statements such as, “I see where you are coming from,” and “That makes a lot of sense.” This shows that you are actively listening to what they are saying, and you won’t just force your ideas upon them. Persuasive people allow others to be entitled to their opinions and they treat these opinions as valid. They do this because it shows respect, which makes the other person more likely to consider their point of view.

9. Asking stupid Questions

How many times have you experienced being asked a ‘non’ question?

The biggest mistake people make when it comes to listening is failing to hear what’s being said because they are focusing on what they’re going to say next or how what the other person is saying is going to affect them. People like to know you’re listening, and something as simple as a clarification question shows not only that you are listening but also that you care about what they’re saying. You’ll be surprised how much respect and appreciation you gain just by asking questions.

10. Leaving a Strong worst Impression

Research shows that most people decide whether or not they like you within the first seven seconds of meeting you. They then spend the rest of the conversation internally justifying their initial reaction. This may sound terrifying, but admit it, you have done this yourself subconsciously! By knowing this, you can take advantage of it to make huge gains in your likeability and ability to persuade. First impressions are intimately tied to positive body language. Strong posture, a firm handshake, a smile, and opening your shoulders to the person you are talking to will help ensure that your first impression is a good one.

Conclusion

People naturally (and unconsciously) mirror the body language of the person they’re talking to. If you want people to like you and believe in you, smile at them during a conversation, and they will unconsciously return the favour and feel good as a result. Persuasive people smile a lot because they have genuine enthusiasm for their ideas. This has a contagious effect on everyone they encounter. Doing this one thing will help to align all the other points and you will be happy when researching your ideal audience.

About the Author

15 Must-Own Books No Serious Entrepreneur Should Ignore

Need help getting organized? Want to learn how to take a business into a global marketplace? Looking for ways to improve leadership skills? Then check out The Little Coffee Break Mindfeed eBooks from IQ 2 EQ by Diane Shawe. This collection of eBooks exposes readers to new ideas and proven strategies, and each can be completed on a lunch break, over breakfast, or while enjoying a cup of coffee.

According to author Diane Shawe, “The idea for the short, powerful eBooks came to my mind when I realized how often people need to brush up on topics, but do not always have time to sit down to read 200 pages. As a result, I have authored several short yet effective eBooks that get right to the point with tips and advice.”

Diane Shawe’s eBooks are available on Amazon right now at: https://www.amazon.com/Diane-Shawe/e/B0052WG8V6

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