Tag Archives: smartphone

How answering 77 questions could help you avoid business failure

Out Now: 77 Ways to avoid Potential Business Failure77 Questions to avoid business failure by Diane Shawe white background

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.” –Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple

Like you I Never Thought I Could answer 77 questions that would help me  avoid business failure  – But I Finally Discovered The Secret! Here’s How…

article by Diane Shawe Author

Are you ready? Is Entrepreneurship For You?
Are you the right person for your business idea?

In business, there are no guarantees. There is simply no way to eliminate all the risks associated with starting a small business – but you can improve your chances of success with good planning, preparation, and insight. Start by evaluating your strengths and weaknesses as a potential owner and manager of a small business. Carefully consider each of the following questions.

  • Are you a self-starter? It will be entirely up to you to develop projects, organise your time, and follow through on details.
  • How well do you get along with different personalities? Business owners need to develop working relationships with a variety of people including customers, vendors, staff, bankers, and professionals such as lawyers, accountants or consultants. Can you deal with a demanding client, an unreliable vendor, or a cranky receptionist if your business interests demand it?
  • How good are you at making decisions? Small business owners are required to make decisions constantly – often quickly, independently, and under pressure.
  • Do you have the physical and emotional stamina to run a business? Business ownership can be exciting, but it’s also a lot of work. Can you face six or seven 12-­hour work days every week?
  • How well do you plan and organise? Research indicates that poor planning is responsible for most business failures. Good organisation ­ of financials, inventory, schedules, and production ­ can help you avoid many pitfalls.
  • Is your drive strong enough? Running a business can wear you down emotionally. Some business owners burn out quickly from having to carry all the responsibility for the success of their business on their own shoulders. Strong motivation will help you survive slowdowns and periods of burnout.
  • How will the business affect your family? The first few years of business start­up can be hard on family life. It’s important for family members to know what to expect and for you to be able to trust that they will support you during this time. There also may be financial difficulties until the business becomes profitable, which could take months or years. You may have to adjust to a lower standard of living or put family assets at risk in the short-term.

So Before you start – Do you know the answer to these 77 questions?  Download your copy today it will be the best £3.99 you spend? 

I recommend you get a little notebook and start working on each question. For those you cannot answer, find the answer and make a note.  This is also an invaluabe excercise if you are already in business, it can help you clarify where you are today and help you plot where you need to get too and how to do it.

Get your exclusive copy today and save £3.00

Get your exclusive copy today and save £3.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to find out if you are right for your business, we have a surprise link hidden inside this little ebook.  All you have to do is Answer 10 questions and we will send you a full report which will also include your Personal Training Needs Analysis to develop your Entrepreneur skills.

Diane Shawe Author of 77 Question to avoid business failure Available from Amazon

Diane Shawe Author of 77 Question to avoid business failure Available from Amazon

The dangers of being out-thought and out- manoeuvre by your competitors

soft skills training for sales team by diane shaweBuyers Don’t Follow a Linear Path anymore so why ask your sales team to do the same?

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

The sales funnel relies on the theory that someone comes into the top of the funnel and sales fall out the bottom. But is that true in today’s world? Do we start at the top and make our way through to the end? Or do we start at the top, leave, jump levels, come back, leave again, come back at the beginning and some point come back and buy or totally just leave? Are sales people  following a linear purchase pattern or an erratic path of engagement that sometimes results in less and fewer sales?

Distraction is the Number One Barrier to Sale

Distraction is destroying the Sales Funnel. It’s clear that buyer behaviour is erratic, but they are also finicky and overloaded with information.. Distraction may very well be the number one barrier to a sale. We get distracted and abandon our cart. We stop reading the article that brought us to you. Simply put, any little distraction means we move on to something else and we may never come back. We are also finicky buyers, what we think one day may be dramatically changed by another piece of content that contradicts our previous opinion.

Let’s take a look at the Sales Funnel Concept.

The sales funnel has been around for as long as any of us has been in business. It is a tool that has been used to visualize everything from the sales process to marketing impact on an organization. I use to be a  fan of the sales funnel.  But the truth is, the traditional sales funnel model has been dead for years; we just haven’t come to accept it yet. They say a picture paints a thousand words, the problem is clients are overloaded with the same information.

SALES-Marketing-Funnels dead. avpt Diane Shawe

Buying patterns have changed drastically in the last decade. They’ve changed so much that they have truly broken the sales funnel as we know it.

Old habits die hard, so the big question is whether or not a sales funnel is still a viable model for sales concepts. Here are the biggest challenges I see with the sales funnel in today’s buying environment.

Selling the way your customer wants to buy…Not the way you like to sell

Sales Plan Mapping is all about Rapport.  Rapport is defined as:

“A state of mutual trust and respect existing between two or more people. Rapport is the primary basis for all successful communication.”

Sales Plan Mapping is all about Rapport.  Rapport is defined as: “A state of mutual trust and respect existing between two or more people. Rapport is the primary basis for all successful communication.”  To build rapport with someone you have not met face to face is a learned skill referred to as NLP.

Learning to Plan a Sales map requires knowledge in a new type of Consultative Selling.  Planning a Sale Map would mean learning new skills in 5 key areas:

  • Best Practices
  • Communication Skills
  • Strategy and Traction
  • Sales Project Management
  • Presentation

The strategic role of continuous education

One way to stay on top of a rapidly changing market is to implement a business strategy that maximises the synergies between lifelong learning and workforce productivity.

Without appropriate technological support, training programs appear to be less effective. No matter the size of your business, if you stand still and basque in your current success, this is surely the biggest route to new challenges.

Even though research has shown that E-Learning proves to be an excellent way to achieve quality results in a short timeframe, most users still only dabble with free flimsy or overbearing solutions that provide no tracking, evidence or further sign posting to continue competence training.

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

Getting the world back to work with skills we can trust

POINT OF NEED TRAINING

Point of Need Online-delivered learning, using mobile technology within a context of continuous education, is considered strategic because it:

  • Keeps the workforce appraised of their job functions’ developing requirements, enabling them to make a positive impact on their role individually and as a team and help that Organisation achieve its aims and goals
  • Aids succession planning, helping workers to acquire the knowledge and skills to help them progress within their Organisation
  • Allows Organisations to keep training budgets under tighter control, develop and retain existing employees and reduce the costs related to external human resources recruitment, selection and on-boarding

The current speed of change means that employees need to be trained continuously for Companies to avoid the dangers of being out-thought and out-manoeuvre by competitors especially on qualities such as leadership.

A poorly educated workforce results in decreased, indeed ever decreasing, levels of productivity and reduces their ability to deliver results. Ignorant and poorly skilled staff can’t (or, at least, shouldn’t) be promoted — since they don’t have the appropriate skills to help their company reach its business objectives. So Organisations need to go to the expense, in terms of time and trouble, of recruiting staff with new knowledge and competencies from outside the organisation to cover middle and senior level positions. It’s important to realise that not only does this practice have a negative impact on the organisation, regarding high costs per individual worker, but company results show that this approach isn’t always successful.

According to recent research (Lifelong Education and Labour Market Needs, published in The EvoLLLution online newspaper) examining the need for continuing education in the workforce, 64% of executives who are recruited externally fail within four years of joining the organisation.

Ideally, every company should have a Personal Training Needs Analysis plan in place for each of their employees. This project should engage the employee in identifying training programs that will enable the employees to develop the necessary knowledge and skills specific to them.

How can we help up-skill your sales team without them taking too much time of work?

Modernising your Sales Team – Project Manage Sales Mapping Whitepaper by Diane Shawe M.Ed

Disruptive cloud e-learning has positive implications for employers

start a short course with avpt using mobile phoneThe current speed of change means that employees need to be trained continuously in order for Companies to avoid the dangers of being out-thought and out-maneuvered by competitors.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

Real and tangible data proving the argument and the added value of E-Learning initiatives to stakeholders constantly endorse the use of online technologies to:

  • Keep the workforce appraised of their job functions’ developing requirements, enabling them to make a positive impact within their Organization and help that Organization achieve its aims and goals;
  • Aid succession planning, helping workers to acquire the knowledge and skills to help them progress within their Organization;
  • Allow Organisations to keep training budgets under tighter control, develop and retain existing employees and reduce the costs related to external human resources recruitment, selection and on-boarding.

This system of Training management — often referred to as a learning management system (LMS) — is a key element of an effective professional development plan as well as being a key element of an Organisation’s human resources strategy.

There seems to be universal agreement that the worldwide E-Learning market will show fast and significant growth over the next three years. The worldwide market for Self-Paced E-Learning reached $35.6 billion in 2011. The five-year compound annual growth rate is estimated at around 7.6% so revenues should reach some $51.5 billion by 2016. While the aggregate growth rate is 7.6%, several world regions appear to have significantly higher growth rates. According to recent regional studies, the highest growth rate is in Asia at 17.3%, followed by Eastern Europe, Africa, and Latin America at 16.9%, 15.2%, and 14.6%, respectively.

Each of the world’s regions has its idiosyncrasies In terms of the factors that drive this market. The U.S. and Western Europe markets are the most mature. The U.S.A. spent more on Self-Paced E-Learning than anywhere else in the world. Western Europe is the world’s second largest buying region for E-Learning products and services but Asia is predicted to outspend Western Europe in E-Learning terms by 2016. In 2012, Bersin & Associates stated that there were some 500 providers in the LMS market and only five of them have more than a 4% market share. According to this, the LMS market was expected to reach $1.9 billion in 2013. However the growth exceeded expectations, closing the year at $2.55 billion.

The Cloud is changing the way Organisations, Employees and Partners interact and collaborate. Within the Cloud solutions universe, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) is playing a major role. According to Gartner, SaaS will continue to experience healthy growth through 2014 and 2015, when worldwide revenue is projected to reach around $22 billion. Gartner has stated that many Enterprises are now replacing their legacy systems with SaaS-based CRM systems. Enterprise clients also report that SaaS-based CRM systems are delivering new applications that deliver complementary functions which are not possible with older, legacy CRM platforms.

Various surveys and analyses into the reasons behind this big growth in SaaS agree on at least three. SaaS brings:

  • Speed of implementation
  • Savings on capital expenditures
  • Savings in terms of operational expenses

The SaaS model is also playing a major role in helping to increase the size of the E-Learning market. Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), as well as large Corporations are making the adoption of a SaaS LMS a key priority. In particular, large Corporations are switching to a SaaS LMS from in-house LMS solutions or they are now using a SaaS LMS as a secondary learning system for special training purposes.

E-Learning is subjected to the influences of sales trends related to smart connected devices and the Internet megatrend (that is, the spread of the Internet in the world).

According to IDC, the number of PCs will fall from 28.7% of the device market in 2013 to 13% in 2017. Tablets will increase from 11.8% in 2013 to 16.5% by 2017, and smartphones will increase from 59.5% to 70.5%.

The new frontier to address is the trend towards Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) — where individuals take their personal (usually mobile) devices to workplaces. Increasingly, these seem to be being used to help their owners perform work activities (including formal training), both in and out of the workplace. Smartphones are the most common examples of these devices but employees often also use their tablets or laptops in the workplace.

While the corporate-training market has lagged behind other education-based sectors, it continues to represent a viable investment opportunity.

The corporate-training market is among the most cyclical within the education industry. Since 2010, employers’ total spending on training and the amount spent per employee — the key data used to measure this sector — have been declining. However, the corporate market related to outsourced services (net of all ancillary costs) has grown to reach 42% of total expenditure.

Download report here Strategies for Modernising Corporate Learning by Diane Shawe M.Ed Dec 2014

Within the training industry, the E-Learning sector has grown consistently in recent years. All its subsectors (Packaged Content, Platform, and Authoring tools) show positive annual growth. Market acceptance of E-Learning has resulted in its increased use for both large and small companies. SaaS/ Cloud E-Learning solutions are particularly suitable for Organizations ranging from SMEs to large institutions.

General budget constraints appear to be the main drivers of the shift towards using E-Learning. However, E-Learning is not merely a solution which is attractive during an economic downturn but it is also an efficient and cost-effective solution when workers — especially those in Organisations with a widely geographically distributed workforce — need to be brought up-to-speed quickly on relevant knowledge and skills.

With the inflow of an estimated $6 billion of venture capital over the past five years, E-Learning is being driven not only by startup dot-com entrepreneurs but also by big corporations, for-profit spin-off ventures, as well as big and small universities

AVPT, a disruptive Cloud E-Learning solutions provider with over 400 courses. We welcome the opportunity to further the conversation with you to discuss the white labelling of a LMS system populated with bespoke softskills courses or access to a

Our training initiatives (incorporating individual and group training activities) are monitored and managed via a consistent and reliable tracking system that can be stored, consulted and analysed as required. The system’s data will be useful for management reports on productivity and for assessing individuals’ career advancement.

Please contact us to learn more about how an integrated learning management system can empower your employees to greater effectiveness without incurring massive development cost and extensive lead time. www.startashortcourse.uk or call 0203 551 2621

Sources:

  • GSV, Education Factbook 2012
  • IBIS Capital, E-Learning lesson for the future
  • Tower Watson, Global Workforce study 2012
  • Accenture, Technology Vision 2014
  • BMO Capital Markets, US Education Research 2011
  • The EvoLLLution ,
  • Lifelong Education and Labor Market needs
  • Georgetown University, Projections of Jobs and Education requirements through 2018

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on outcomes

there's never been a better time to start a short coureTHE SPEED OF CHANGE IN MODERN BUSINESS DEMANDS A NEW APPROACH TO SUPPORTING LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE AT THE POINT OF NEED.

article by Diane Shawe M.Ed

“THE IMPORTANCE AND EVIDENCE -BASED APPROACH TO
LEARNING USING MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IS INFLUENCING HOW INVESTMENT IN CONTINUED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF A WORKFORCE IS ACHIEVED”

New market opportunities open and close at blinding speed, new competitors emerge overnight, product lifecycles are getting shorter, and customers are more knowledgeable and sophisticated. This fast-changing environment has led to requirement to change learning and training. However more often than not, the task of aligning the learning organisation to the business can be challenging and the perception of how the business views the learning organisation in terms of aligning to strategic initiatives is different to how the learning organisation perceives itself.

Downsizing has resulted in a mass drainage and outflow of skills as employees or contractors are let go. To ensure that an organisation can compete globally and remains at par with the technological changes in the global market committing to the investment of on-going skill training is often viewed as a potential unnecessary incision into the bottom line
Start a short course to grow

Corporates, enterprises and charities all wish to run their operations at the minimum costs allowed. We all recognise that in today’s environment, business moves faster than ever. Most organisations now recognise the importance of developing a strategic approach to learning and harnessing the internal skills of their teams. Moving away from more tactical based activities associated with training such as measuring skills-based behaviours, to focusing on acquisition of knowledge and learning transfer that result in individual and organisational performance improvements.

With the explosion of mobile technology, organisations need to take advantage of the benefits, scalability, and viability of using mobile e-learning, using smart phones, tablets, and notepads that offer a blended solution.

E-learning has the potential to fully integrate the benefits of personal freedom with connectivity (belonging to a purposeful group of learners). From an educational perspective the “e” in e-learning stands for more than electronic; it can also stand for extending and enhancing the learning experience.

Fulfilling the buyers requirements

Corporate strategy for modernising learning free report by Diane ShaweThe four pillars that go to underpin the buyer’s requirements and therefore still define the industry offerings are centred on the following: • Compliance and accreditation

  • Scalable and flexible whilst achieving a real reduction in Cost
  • Improving, tracking and measuring Learners’ performance
  • Real time management, alignment and communication to support on-going changes.
  • The ability to track and report learner performance remains uppermost in many procurers’ minds.

Isaac Asimov’s quote is now more urgent and relevant if corporates are to gain a lean and competitive advantage with a progressive highly skilled workforce for the 21st century.

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.”

Why strategies for modernising corporate learning should focus on outcomes rather than input by Diane Shawe M.Ed

Worldclass Free Business Growth Bootcamp with Bill Walsh in London

Do you need to fine tune your big business idea?  Are you looking for a partner? Then this is an event not to be missed!

Bill Walsh free Business Growth Seminar in London hosted by Diane Shawe

Bill Walsh has agreed to come to the UK from the US and give a free Business Growth Session whilst I host a business success panel.To post your question to the panelists Click here 

Come to this free event and learn how to launch & build an even more successful business with one of the World’s most successful Business Coach. Normally to attend one of his sessions would cost over £1,000

When you attend you will have the opportunity to put your questions to our Business Panelist and network
with local business executives.

The educational focus is on Business Growth – Public Speaking and how to create your own VIP Masterminds. Plus everyone will receive some amazing gifts just for attending!

Here’s why you should attend:

Bill Walsh will discuss:

How to Monetise your Intellectual Property
How to Build a 12-Month Success Plan
How to Connect & Do deals with the Ultra-Successful
How to Become laser focused & ultra-productive
How to Monetise your Passion

For Complimentary Tickets visit CLICK HERE

Sponsored by Diane Shawe CEO of AVPT Ltd.

get mentoring with diane shawe business start up loans

 

Bill Walsh New book out now Oblivion Get your copy now

Do you have questions about Business Start up and Growth Bootcamp with Bill Walsh Millionaire Coach? Click here to register your question

Does nine different kinds of intelligence make you any smarter?

In this article, I will talk about the different ways in which Multiple Intelligence Theory can be implemented in e-Learning to help the learner effectively acquire, retain, and utilise the information being provided within the e-Learning course.

the enquiry process to soft skills training april 2014

The Multiple Intelligence Theory was developed by Dr. Howard Gardner in 1983. Dr. Gardner, a noted psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, suggested that every human being interacts with their environment differently. We each possess nine different kinds of intelligence, but our experiences, cultural beliefs, and knowledge base determine their exact configuration.

What is “intelligence”, according to Multiple Intelligence Theory?

According to Gardner, there are three key elements that determine a person’s intelligence:

  1. The ability to create a service or product that will be valued in the person’s society of culture.

  2. A skill set that allows the person to solve real world problems that they may encounter in life.

  3. The ability to potentially create new solutions for problems or to utilize existing solutions. This typically involves the acquisition of new knowledge. 

Multiple Intelligence-Based Activities in eLearning

Multiple Intelligence Theory can be implemented in eLearning based upon the nine multiple intelligences. Let’s take a closer look at each category and which multiple intelligence-based activities can be utilized during instructional design to create the best possible eLearning experience for the learners:

  1. Musical (or Rhythmic) Intelligence
    This intelligence involves the capacity to think and learn in terms of music and rhythm, and to recognize and hear patterns. An activity that would appeal to this type of intelligence is a lesson that includes music or sound, such as a multimedia presentation. Try to use music that emphasizes the subject matter and creates a more immersive experience for the learner. Since there is more of an auditory aspect with this particular intelligence, lectures can also be very helpful. People who demonstrate a high degree of musical intelligence may be ideally suited for musical professions, such as composing or playing an instrument.

  2. Linguistic Intelligence
    This intelligence is associated with expression through language. These people tend to be able to eloquently convey their thoughts and to understand the words of others. Writers and speakers typically display a high degree of this sort of intelligence. Any activities that include discussion, such as online forums or group-based scenarios, are ideal for individuals who lean more toward linguistic intelligence.

  3. Mathematical (or Logical) Intelligence
    This involves the ability to identify principles or structures within a system. This intelligence is often associated with the logic or the manipulation of numbers.  Activities ideally suited for this intelligence may include diagrams, charts, or tables. Critical thinking scenarios are also useful with this group. Accountants and researchers often have a high level of mathematical intelligence.

  4. Kinesthetic (or Bodily) Intelligence
    Body Intelligence involves the use of a person’s entire body to figure out solutions or to create something. People who demonstrate a high degree of kinesthetic intelligence may be ideally suited for performing arts professions, such as dancing, or careers that require an innate knowledge of one’s own body, such as a doctor or athlete. Activities that are best suited for this sort of intelligence include games that involve hand-eye-coordination or interactive scenarios that require physical involvement. The thing to keep in mind about this group is that they are best able to learn when muscular movement is involved. So, include activities that require movement and physical response.

  5. Spatial Intelligence
    This intelligence pertains to a keen sense of space and how one can navigate those spaces. Activities that involve flow charts and graphics are ideal for this intelligence group, as well as games or multimedia that is visually appealing.  Architects, pilots, and sailors often have a high degree of spatial intelligence.

  6. Intrapersonal Intelligence
    This involves an in depth understanding of oneself, such as what you can accomplish and how you react to certain situations. As such, individuals with high intrapersonal intelligence often have a sense of what they should avoid and what they want to achieve in their lives. Professors and philosophers often possess high degrees of intrapersonal intelligence. Activities such as collaborative learning exercises (online forums) and chat programs enable intrapersonal intelligence learners to help others and to share experiences and ideas. This category responds well, first and foremost, to activities, which require introspection.

  7. Interpersonal Intelligence
    This is the capacity to understand and learn from others. People who demonstrate a high degree of intrapersonal intelligence may be ideally suited for service professions, such as teaching or politics. Those who identify more with this category of intelligence may benefit from group discussion activities and in depth questions that make them fully explore the topic. What’s important to remember about interpersonal intelligence is that these individuals are sensitive to others’ moods and feelings. They work well in-group settings and are often able to learn more effectively when collaborating.

  8. Naturalist Intelligence
    This intelligence involves the capacity to differentiate between living organisms and to view the connection between all natural things.  People with a high degree of naturalist intelligence usually have a close bond with nature. Botany and biology are two career fields that closely identify with this sort of intelligence. Activities that involve classification or organization appeal to these individuals.

  9. Existential Intelligence
    This particular intelligence was added later by Gardner, and is not commonly associated with learning environments, as it is geared more toward spiritual and philosophical views. For example, someone who has a high degree of existentialist intelligence may have a tendency to pose questions about life’s purpose or death. 

It’s important to note that instructional designers should not feel obligated to incorporate all of these multiple intelligence-based activities into their eLearning courses, just that it may be beneficial to offer a variety of multiple intelligence-based activities to more effectively illustrate the subject matter. If you are able to offer learners a diverse set of learning tools and eLearning strategies, then you gain the ability to increase comprehension and retention, not to mention enhance the overall eLearning experience.

Call us to enquiry about our soft skills courses

Call us to inquiry about our soft skills courses

BYOD! The change is here.

Bring Your Own Device

1 personal development beta students needed

Try out our LMS system today

Tim T Dingle BSc (Hons) MIBiol PGCE MBA Chief Development Officer at the Academy of Vocational and Professional Training.

AVPT Global is issuing a technological tsunami alert; feel the force of a very real wave of BYOD / BYOT and new mobile learning and learn how to avoid being swamped.

Here at AVPT Global we like to bring you some advanced news and perhaps a serious warning of impending change. I have worked in the education sector for 25 years and seen many changes in technology during that time. There is a clear and present need to improve the soft skills and learning of individuals- whether at School, University or in business. Already at AVPT we are using the latest technology to improve training and it is clear that mobile learning is massive. I came across the term bring your own device (BYOD) in a recent workshop for employers. It means the policy of permitting employees to bring personally owned mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smart phones) to their workplace and use those devices to access company information and applications. The term bring your own technology (BYOT) is being used more frequently in an educational context. It is a part of a supplementary school technology resourcing model, where the home and the school collaborate in arranging for use their own digital technology to be extended into the classroom to assist their teaching and learning and the organisation of their schooling.

The BYOD / BYOT ‘tsunami’ is rapidly coming over the horizon for educational institutions and businesses. BYOD is making significant inroads in the business world already with about 75% of employees in high growth markets such as Brazil and Russia and 44% in developed markets already using their own technology at work. In most cases, businesses simply can’t block the trend.

We believe that BYOD may help employees be more productive and become genuine Life Long Learners. It can and should increase employee morale and convenience by using their own devices and makes the company look like a flexible and attractive employer.  Many feel that BYOD can even be a means to attract new staff (and we all know how hard it is to get the right person on board): 44% of job seekers now view an organisation more positively if it supports their device.

AVPTGLOBAL almost 400 courses all globally accredited

AVPTGLOBAL almost 400 courses all globally accredited

We have found at AVPT that if businesses are to survive they will need to be proactive and really note and respond to the trends.  They will need to shape the largely inevitable development to the best advantage or try to surpass the deeds of King Canute and prevent the wave from swamping their institutions. Perhaps not surprisingly at this very early stage many of the early BYOT moves are making this mistake, are naïve, simplistic and preoccupied with the relatively mundane, showing little appreciation of what BYOT could entail.

We believe at AVPT global that there are least six global megatrends coming together that will impact on all businesses, schools, institutions to some form of BYOT. These megatrends relate to the normalised use of personal digital devices in every facet of life, the burgeoning digital and educative capacity of the student’s homes, cloud computing, parent digital empowerment, government’s increasing inability to fund state of the art personal technology for all and the inexorable evolution of schooling from its insular paper-based mode to one that is more digital and networked.

Fundamental to BYOT is that personal choice of the technology by the individual (whether in School, Higher Education and Business). While businesses /schools might and probably should provide advice, the final choice should rest with the individual. The will give an enhanced facility for the personalisation of learning in and outside the business and educational premises. That is the secret of the success of online mobile learners. In our online Learning Management System that can be used by the owner of device, at home, work or on the move (found out VTF are driving this change).The individuals are having their ownership of the technology and the information respected and absorbed.

Get qualified whilst on the move with AVPT

Get qualified whilst on the move with AVPT

So the future that BYOD / BYOT is creating will cause a profound educational change. It has immense potential that will assist change in the nature of schooling, teaching, learning and the relationship with homes and work. However, to realise this potential there has to be really strong leadership in education and businesses management. It has to change thinking and begin to understand what is needed terms of the power of mobile learning. Leaders have to take charge of the process, understand the possibilities and appreciate what is required for sustained success and development. At AVPT we see leaders training who are training to be proactive, learning about the forces impelling institutions to some form of BYOT. We see the need to appreciate the real potential for society in educational, social, economic, technical, administrative and political terms.

At the Academy of Vocational and Professional Training we believe these are still very early days with BYOT / BYOD. There isn’t much out there being written about these changes to mobile learning except in some pioneers in the field. The focus of most business and institutions is technical with little thought given the wider educational or financial implications. The greatest challenge with BYOT / BYOD will be human. The technical aspect is easy- and always will be. The key is to understand the historic significance of this development and to recognise that we are moving to a new model of mobile learning, teaching and institutional resourcing where everyone collaborates, facilitates and genuine accepts these changes.

AVPTLTD LOGO  6

Keep Taking the Tablets

Keep taking the tablets

Keep taking the tablets

-More Than 1 Billion Smart Devices Sold Last Year Changes Everything

article by: Tim T Dingle BSc (Hons) MIBiol PGCE MBA  CDO at AVPTGLOBAL

I can remember clearly (it was after all, only 3 years ago on April 3rd 2010) when Steve Jobs unveiled a unique consumer tablet with an unusual name. It had been one of his obsessions for years, even before the iPhone. Many people thought Apple would be better served by coming out with a netbook: you remember netbooks, don’t you?

According to the International Data Corporation[1], worldwide shipments of smart connected devices grew an amazing 29.1% year over year in 2012, crossing 1 billion units sold with a value of $576.9 billion. The market expansion was largely driven by 78.4% year-over-year growth in tablet shipments, which surpassed 128 million in 2012. Quite astonishing and I hope everyone had a great Christmas opening the tablets!

We all know that smart devices can deliver amazing functionality; from constant Internet and social media connection to brilliantly helpful apps. They are genuinely changing the way we operate as a society. The change is happening so rapidly and almost seamlessly that most of us probably don’t realise how much we use and rely on our smartphones and tablets.  How did the business world even operate without employees having constant access to their phones, email and the Internet? How did busy parents keep track of their schedules without a calendar that never leaves their side and actually reminds them of events?

apps galore!

apps galore!

If we pause to consider that now we can use apps to find the best meal when on the road, the nearest petrol station or to locate possible holdups on route. We don’t even have to watch TV or connect to an online news site to get instant national and local news. We can scan rail and plane tickets with our smart phones and check in with no paper for international flights. While smart devices are making everyday activities easier for consumers, some businesses are facing challenges to compete effectively. The challenge is being met by forward thinking companies like AVPT Global[2] who seek to use tablets and smart phone technology to be at the heart of online learning and push forward the rise of mLearning.

The iPad and other smart devices (including my brilliant Samsung Note 10.1) have had huge initial impact on access to information, business sales and social interaction. In fact the pioneering of this new category has in some ways been even more significant than the iPod and even the iPhone, because it has disrupted so many different device manufacturers. It has created a market opportunity for smart device manufacturers and created a challenge to other PC makers and even potentially influencing how we may watch television in the future. It has also extended digital content opportunities to make books and video on-the-go a more practical experience, ending the back breaking march of the child with books to school perhaps?

The iPad was the first device to successfully bridge the gap between the PC and smartphone for consumers. Since it landed in the first consumer’s hands more than 55 million iPads have been sold worldwide, used for watching (and streaming) movies, reading books, magazines and newspapers, Web surfing and playing games. Tablets are becoming familiar common coffee-table fixtures in households around the country. They’re also being stowed in the briefcases and bags of travellers, whether they’re going by car or by plane. And they’re increasingly carried by teachers, doctors, lawyers, real estate agents — a wide range of professionals who find they can do much of their work with a tablet. Put simply, the tablet has become the go-to PC substitute for a variety of activities.

A smarter way to study with www.avptglobal.com

A smarter way to study with http://www.avptglobal.com

People now leave their laptops behind more often, taking advantage of the tablet’s lighter weight, ubiquitous wifi (and 3G /4G) connectivity, its longer battery life and catalogue of useful applications. We are seeing some of the tasks traditionally performed on PCs and laptops, now being performed on the tablet. In fact, all five of the top activities (email, Web surfing, game-playing, social networking and online shopping) shifted towards the tablet in late 2011.

Many of these are activities we do on our smart phones, of course, but doing them on the tablet is not only more pleasurable visually, it leads to entirely new behaviours. Watching video (be it movies, TV or YouTube) is definitely one of the preferred uses of tablet owners who also have smartphones, as is Web surfing and email, according to new research from Nielsen. In a great piece of research called, “Tablets are for meals. Smartphones are for snacks,” Nielsen[3] shows how 10 per cent or less of smartphone owners opt to do those activities on their phones. Social networking (both Facebook and Twitter) is also better done on a tablet than smartphone, as is writing emails. Aside from making phone calls, the only activity right now where the smartphone beats the tablet is instant messaging. But even 18 per cent said they’re doing that on their tablets. It appears that mobile phones tend to be the gateway drug in emerging markets where consumers typically move on to a tablet.

The IDC report that grabbed the headlines last week (1.2 billion smart devices), goes on to say that it expects global smart connected device unit shipments to surpass 2.2 billion units by 2017. Consumers and business buyers are now starting to see smartphones, tablets, and PCs as a single continuum of connected devices separated primarily by screen size. Each of these devices is primarily used for data applications and different individuals choose different sets of screen sizes in order to fit their unique needs. These kinds of developments are creating exciting new opportunities that will continue to drive the smart connected devices market forward in a positive way. The first step on the long road to mLearning is just beginning and the potential for individuals and companies to grasp the opportunity is seen by only a few.

Taking the Tablets has never been so exciting.

AVPT-Logo-ALL-INFO


[2] The Academy of Vocational and Professional Training www.avptglobal.com

[3] Dan Lee, Director of Product, Digital Nielsen July 18th 2012

Shops track customers via mobile phone

Signals given off by phones allow shopping centres to monitor how long people stay and which stores they visit

Customers in shopping centres are having their every move tracked by a new type of surveillance that listens in on the whisperings of their mobile phones.

The technology can tell when people enter a shopping centre, what stores they visit, how long they remain there, and what route they take as they walked around.

The device cannot access personal details about a person’s identity or contacts, but privacy campaigners expressed concern about potential intrusion should the data fall into the wrong hands.

The surveillance mechanism works by monitoring the signals produced by mobile handsets and then locating the phone by triangulation – measuring the phone’s distance from three receivers.

smarter way to connectIt has already been installed in two shopping centres, including Gunwharf Quays in Portsmouth, and three more centres will begin using it next month, i-send co has learnt.

The company that makes the dishes, which measure 30cm (12 inches) square and are placed on walls around the centre, said that they were useful to centres that wanted to learn more about the way their customers used the store.

A shopping mall could, for example, find out that 10,000 people were still in the store at 6pm, helping to make a case for longer opening hours, or that a majority of customers who visited Gap also went to Next, which could useful for marketing purposes.

In the case of Gunwharf Quays, managers were surprised to discover that an unusually high percentage of visitors were German – the receivers can tell in which country each phone is registered – which led to the management translating the instructions in the car park.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) expressed cautious approval of the technology, which does not identify the owner of the phone but rather the handset’s IMEI code – a unique number given to every device so that the network can recognise it.

But an ICO spokesman said, “we would be very worried if this technology was used in connection with other systems that contain personal information, if the intention was to provide more detailed profiles about identifiable individuals and their shopping habits.”

Only the phone network can match a handset’s IMEI number to the personal details of a customer.

Liberty, the campaign group, said that although the data do not meet the legal definition of ‘personal information’, it “had the potential” to identify particular individuals’ shopping habits by referencing information held by the phone networks.

Owners of large buildings currently have to rely on manual surveys to find out how customers use the space, which can be relevant to questions of design such as where the toilets should be located or which stores should be placed next to one another.

Other types of wireless technology, such as wi-fi and Bluetooth, can be used to locate devices, but the regular phone network signal is preferable because it is much more powerful and fewer receivers are needed to monitor a given area.

Phone networks have long been capable of gauging the rough location of a handset using three phone masts, but the margin error can be as great as 2km. The process is also less efficient when the phone is indoors.

“You’re basically going to know that that person has been in Starbucks,” Toby Oliver, the company’s chief technology officer, said.

Even when the owner is not using it, a mobile phone makes contact with the network every couple of minutes, which is enough for the receivers to get a reading on its position.

Source: http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article3945496.ece