Tag Archives: stress

Is Stress affecting your Hair?

Article by Diane Shawe

How can stress cause hair loss?

Hair loss has been a major concern for both genders in recent times. However, very few people actually know about the causes which include stress. Stress sometimes induces hair loss which is sometimes irreversible. There are various treatments which can treat and disguise hairloss.

The link between stress and hair loss

Stress can lead to Telogen Effluvium which is a medical condition leading to hair loss. Telogen effluvium is often responsible for large portions of hair loss, where the hair typically falls out in ‘handfuls’. Up to 70% of scalp hair can be lost through this condition. Telogen effluvium doesn’t actually cause hair loss, instead it causes the hair to stop growing.

Stress can also lead to a condition called Alopecia Areata. This causes white blood cells to attack the hair follicles in the scalp, leading to very instantaneous hair loss. Hair often falls out in patches, but total hair loss can affect the whole scalp in the space of a few weeks. In very extreme cases, alopecia areata can also affect body hair – causing it to fall out as well.

After hair has fallen out due to stress, it often grows back. However, in some instances it does not and treatment can be required. We can advise on multiple solutions to help prevent, slow down or disguise hair loss caused from stress.

Disguising hair loss during treatment

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We do advise that a visit tho your doctor is recommended to check for other related symptoms.

Managing Pressure and Maintaining work balance

How to manage pressure at work 1 day course

When things are extremely busy at work and you have your hands full with many tasks and dealing with difficult people, having skills you can draw on are essential for peace of mind and growth. This one-day course will help participants understand the causes and costs of workplace pressure, the benefits of creating balance, and how to identify pressure points. They will also learn how to apply emotional intelligence, increase optimism and resilience, and develop strategies for getting ahead.

This one-day workshop will help participants learn how to:

  • o   Apply a direct understanding of pressure points and their costs and payoffs
  • o   Speak in terms related to emotional intelligence, optimism, and resilience
  • o   Create a personalized toolkit for managing stressors and anger
  • o   Work on priorities and achieve defined goals

 Cick to book your seat now.

Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Under Pressure!

To begin the course, participants will explore the causes and costs of workplace pressure as well as the benefits of creating balance. Participants will also learn what their pre-assignment score means.

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

Next, participants will learn how to identify their pressure points and create an action plan to manage them. They will also learn some tips for facing problems and when to seek help.

Emotional Intelligence

In this session, participants will learn about the seven human emotions and Plutchik’s wheel of emotions. They will also learn how to validate emotions in others, build optimism, and develop resilience.

Coping Toolkit

This session will give participants some ways to manage stress, cope with anger, and express themselves assertively.

Getting Organised

To wrap things up, participants will learn some ways to get organised and reduce pressure set up a action plan.

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

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Why Stress can stop you from achieving excellence in 2013

managing your stress

managing your stress

Article by Diane Shawe M.Ed.

Take 5 minutes a day to keep your stress level down

Everything seems much faster, urgent and possibly unfulfilling! Just after Christmas and heading into the New Year it can often be a stressful time for lots of people for lots of reasons.

Stress is created by worrying about things in the future or things that have already happened, both of which you cannot change at the very moment you are worrying about it.

Before you read any further do this little test.  ‘At this very very moment whist you are reading this is there a problem affecting you reading this article at this moment in time that is stopping you from reading it? If your answer is ‘no’ then this is because you are living in the ‘NOW’

Living too much into the future or reliving the past are both causes of fear and pain. You would probably find yourself concerned with some of the following thoughts…

  • How can I stop the pain?
  • How can I switch your mind off,
  • How can I stop worrying?
  • How can I relax?
  • How can I be happy?

Well I invite you to explore two words ‘acceptance’ and ‘surrender’ a good place to start.

Become fully present is very empowering and helps you live in the higher order of thinking.

If only our lives was like typing when we can simply undo, delete or Hyperlink to a quick useful reference but alas, lots of things are unavoidable in life.  Never before has it become more important to find ways to decrease and prevent stressful incidents and decrease negative reactions to stress, especially as they can lead to short or long term illnesses.

Here are some of the things that can be done instantly by just remembering to be conscious of them.

Managing time

Time management skills can allow you more time with your family and friends and possibly increase your performance and productivity. This will help reduce your stress.

To improve your stress management:

  • Save time by focusing and concentrating, delegating, and scheduling time for yourself.
  • Keep a record of how you spend your time, including work, family, and leisure time.
  • Prioritise your time by rating tasks by importance and urgency.
  • Redirect your time to those activities that are important and meaningful to you.
  • Manage your commitments by not over- or under committing. Don’t commit to what is not important to you.
  • Deal with procrastination by using a day planner, breaking large projects into smaller ones, and setting short-term deadlines.
  • Examine your beliefs to reduce conflict between what you believe and what your life is like.
  • Build healthy coping strategies

It is important that you identify your coping strategies. One way to do this is by recording the stressful event, your reaction, and how you cope in a stress journal. With this information, you can work to change unhealthy coping strategies into healthy ones-those that help you focus on the positive and what you can change or control in your life.

Lifestyle

Some behaviors and lifestyle choices affect your stress level. They may not cause stress directly, but they can interfere with the ways your body seeks relief from stress. Try to:

  • Balance personal, work, and family needs and obligations.
  • Have a sense of purpose in life.
  • Get enough sleep, since your body recovers from the stresses of the day while you are sleeping.
  • Eat a balanced diet for a nutritional defense against stress.
  • Get moderate exercise throughout the week.
  • Limit your consumption of alcohol.
  • Don’t smoke.

Social support

Social support is a major factor in how we experience stress. Social support is the positive support you receive from family, friends, and the community. It is the knowledge that you are cared for, loved, esteemed, and valued. More and more research indicates a strong relationship between social support and better mental and physical health.

Changing your thinking pattern

When an event triggers negative thoughts, you may experience fear, insecurity, anxiety, depression, rage, guilt, and a sense of worthlessness or powerlessness. These emotions trigger the body’s stress, just as an actual threat does. Dealing with your negative thoughts and how you see things can help reduce stress.

  • Thought-catching helps you stop a negative thought to help eliminate stress.
  • Disproving irrational thoughts helps you to avoid exaggerating the negative thought, anticipating the worst, and interpreting an event incorrectly.
  • Problem solving helps you identify all aspects of a stressful event and find ways to deal with it.
  • Changing your communication style helps you communicate in a way that makes your views known without making others feel put down, hostile, or intimidated. This reduces the stress that comes from poor communication. Use the assertiveness ladder to improve your communication style.

Why Continued Personal Development is important

Lifelong learning it’s important to your continued growth and smiley to core with lives every changing environment, circumstances and economical. Everyday life can often present challenges and like any thing in life if you don’t equip yourself with the right tools trying to fix the problem with the wrong tools can itself be the greater source of frustration.

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