Tag Archives: technology

Tips For Women Entrepreneurs on How To Avoid Feeling Isolated As A Small Business

Female entrepreneurs share how to avoid feeling isolated

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (8)
‘Meeting up with mothers who were running small firms or freelancing made me feel connected to the real world again,’ says The Early Hour’s Anne Ridout

Annie Ridout had a one-year-old daughter when she launched her digital magazine for mothers, The Early Hour, in 2015.
“The only time that I could commit to writing and doing admin was during the baby’s nap times and evenings,” she says.

It meant that she had no free time to socialise and spent most days at home, alone.

She was left feeling incredibly lonely and unmotivated, but all that changed when she started to attend some networking events, including Mothers Meeting and The Step Up Club.

“Meeting up with other mothers who were running small firms or freelancing made me feel connected to the real world again,” she says. “I had women to talk to, moan with and get ideas from.”

At first, Ms Ridout found it intimidating, but soon realised that the key to networking is arriving prepared. “Do some research beforehand about the theme or subject – and think about what can you offer around it,” she says.

Don’t forget to ask for contact details, she adds, explaining that it’s not enough to just hand your card out:

“Send an email after the event saying that it was so lovely to meet them and ask to stay in touch – and don’t worry about coming across too keen; people will almost always be pleased to hear from you.”

Find a mentor

For Victoria Usher, founder of GingerMay PR, leaving the buzz of
an office and the comradeship of colleagues was unsettling when she started her own communications firm:

“It was a shock to realise that time-consuming tasks, such as admin and finances, needed to be factored into my schedule.”

Not having people around to discuss problems with was hard, she admits: “I felt lonely at points; I missed having a team.”

To help her through, she found a mentor, Jo Butcher, whom she met while working for Dentsu Aegis.

“We had a weekly Skype call and she would help me with
everything from brainstorming ideas to sense-checking my work,” explains Ms Usher. “It was comforting to know that there was someone at the end of the phone who had gone through the same and had a successful business to show for it.”

When looking for a mentor, try to find someone who has run a business in a similar field, but has grown it much bigger, she advises. It also helps if they have worked in the same role as you, so they truly understand the pressures that you’re facing.

'There were few people whom I could talk to about work,' says Lenka Lutonska
‘There were few people whom I could talk to about work,’ says Lenka Lutonska

Co-work with colleagues

Female business coach, Lenka Lutonska, thinks women in particular feel lonely when starting-up because they crave emotional connections with others – and that can be hard when working alone.

“When I started out, friends did not understand why I would leave a well-paid job, sell my house and sacrifice my lifestyle, only to work on a business with very little income,” she says. “There were few people whom I could talk to about work; my computer was my only companion.”

She decided to “buddy-up” with an old friend who had started their own business in a similar industry.

“We would create co-working days where she would come to my office for a day, or vice versa. We exchanged ideas, honest feedback, kept each other accountable and even partnered on projects,” says Ms Lutonska.

“Working not only became more enjoyable, but we also helped each other to become aware of our blind spots.”

She also started a Facebook group, which was initially made to attract clients but ended up becoming a great networking tool as word spread quickly and more women joined. Community members often ask for help with specific business issues.

“It can feel lonely to build a business on your own, and tough;
there’s always something that you don’t know.

“That’s why support groups are a fantastic source for tips and for socialising – they’re great for creating meaningful relationships with other entrepreneurs.”

Take a breather

A final tip comes from Sarah Cooke, owner of silicone jewellery company, Halia Rose, who suggests yoga classes.

“I do a regular class to get some time out to myself and stave off burnout, and I can chat to people about things totally unrelated to my business and get away from it for a while.”

Visit The Telegraph on Facebook for more fantastic tips

Why Black men will be Disproportionately Devastated by Industries drive towards Automation

 Black men and disproportionate employment

Black male graduates in London and throughout the UK are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts, figures suggest. In 2016 there was an unemployment rate of 18% for black male graduates aged 16 to 24 in the capital.

According to the data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the rate for their white counterparts was 10%. A government spokesperson said the employment rate for ethnic minorities was “at a record high”. So if the graduates, the brightest and best are having such a hard time what about the lower skilled or unqualified black men?

But for now lets focus on London. More than 83,000 young men in London are from black and mixed black ethnic groups, making up about one in five of young men in the capital.

Research by the National Audit Office (NAO) has found that along with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women, black men consistently have the lowest employment rates in the UK.

BBC London contacted 50 of London 500 top graduate employers last year across the banking, accounting, medical, legal and retail sectors. Eleven were able to provide data relating to their employment of black men specifically. Those 11 organisations recruited 1,803 graduates in 2016. Of those, 30 were black men.

The NHS leadership academy, for trainee managers, was among those which did not recruit any among its intake of 112 graduates.

Larry Elliott Economics Editor for the Guardian headlined on 4th April 2018 that Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD he goes on to write:

The west’s leading economic thinktank has warned its members that they are failing to prepare workers for an automation revolution that will leave 66 million people at risk of being replaced by machines in the coming years.

A new report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the most vulnerable – one in seven workers on average across the 32 countries studied – were less likely to be receiving help than those whose jobs were more secure.

The OECD said 14% of jobs in developed countries were highly automatable, while a further 32% of jobs were likely to experience significant changes to the way they were carried out.

Low-skilled people and youth were among those most at risk, according to the report, with the jobs at highest risk tending to be in low-skill sectors such as food preparation, cleaning and labouring. Workers in fully automatable jobs were more than three times less likely to have participated in on-the-job training, over a 12-month period, than workers in non-automatable jobs. Those most at risk were also less likely to participate in formal education or distance learning.

In September 2017 Mr Lammy a Tottenham MP reviewed the BAME people in the criminal justice system and found that in the UK black people who make up just 3% of the UK population make up 12% of the people in prison at a cost to the tax payer of £309m each year.

Whilst the report highlighted failings on the part of police forces, courts and prisons, it was identified that other issues like one parenthood, school exclusions, low income and high unemployment disproportionately affect some ethnic minority groups and have been linked to higher levels of criminality.

Is Adult Education for Graduates BrokenDiane Shawe author of ‘Is Adult Education Broken?’ states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat for all groups, but has always inexplicably affected the BAME groups. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”.

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Isaac Asimov quote sharpens our focus

“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

A recently published book by #DianeShaweAuthor ‘Is #Adult #Education Broken’?  explores the main failings in the educational system for an economy powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated. What are the lessons to be learnt?

Download a copy from #amazon today Claim you copy now

Is Mobile Technology re-wiring the brains of our Children?

Overload or Growth?

Overload or Growth?

Or is there hope in a BRAIN project funded by the President of the USA?

Well you do hear people say that mobile technology and smart tech is rewiring their brains brain, making a new breed of digital natives and even brain washing our children. The facts are that they will spend 11.5 hours a day using smart technology; whether that’s computers, tablets, television, mobile phones, or video games (and in my experience usually more than one at a time). That is a big chunk of their 15 or 16 waking hours. The media tend to exploit these facts and combine them with pseudo-science with outlandish claims of ‘brain rewiring’ and potential harm. I have heard this uttered in alarm, (usually by those concerned that children’s ability to learn and pay attention) and stated as a ‘good thing’ by others, convinced that a generation of digital natives has developed incredible powers of absorbing and applying information.

Indeed 4 years ago President Obama officially announced in 2013 that 100 million dollars in funding for arguably the most ambitious neuroscience initiative ever proposed. The project has the catchy name of Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies, or BRAIN, and aims to reconstruct the activity of every single neuron as they fire simultaneously in different brain circuits, or perhaps even whole brains. If you have seen Iron Man 3 there is marvellous moment when the evil Aldrich Killian (played by Guy Pearce) shows the beautiful Gwyneth Paltrow inside his brain in real time; a must see moment. The next great project, as Obama called it, could help neuroscientists understand the origins of cognition, perception, and other brain activities, which may lead to new, more effective treatments for conditions like autism or mood disorders and could help veterans suffering from brain injuries. It also might just help people realise why they need to choose a great course and real focus.

neuroscience and nerve system neuroscience brainSo what are facts about neuroscience and mobile smart technology? Can we learn effectively using smart devices? Well, when our minds are engaged in a simple or complex task, the information relevant to that task is held in our STM or short-term memory. According to the late but great psychologist, George Miller, this mental holding space can only contain four to seven pieces of information at a time. To be retained it needs to be transferred to the LTM (long term memory). We can only move information from short-term to long-term memory using our attention; we have to be paying attention to, and thinking about, a fact or a concept in order for it to be encoded in memory.

To encode properly you need to eliminate distractions, which are often caused by multitasking events. Young people report frequent media multitasking (texting, emailing, surfing the web, Twitter and Facebook) while also doing homework. Their belief is they can do it effectively, but research shows otherwise. In fact, research demonstrates that individuals who multitask the most are actually the worst at it. Whether we’re learning with a tablet, smart device or a book, it’s best to give it our best attention.

The rapid evolution of mobile technology has placed quite a burden on our concentration. The day is constantly being challenged by external sources. Even the most pressing of matters can be interrupted at any moment by a familiar buzzing in the pocket. This gives a friendly nudge to pay attention that the brain responds to and many find virtually impossible to resist; alarmingly even while driving. These all too frequent interruptions, coupled with growing expectations for immediate responses (emails responded to at 2am), will challenge our cognitive control system at its very core.

The cognitive control system is our ability to focus on accomplishing a task in the context of competing demands. You might want to look at a course that explains this in more depth. This special ability is what has allowed humans to achieve remarkable achievements, from developing languages and building complex societies.

It doesn’t matter that we think children are growing up digital natives and somehow addicted to technology. It simply doesn’t change how we come to understand new information. Basic understanding happens when we process new information in terms of its meaning, rather than its surface features. Understanding happens when we connect new information to what we know already.

It seems that the competing noise and multitasking distractions, will have a more significant negative impact for those with undeveloped or impaired focus and cognitive control. Those that easily lose focus such as children and us older adults, or in the presence of neurological or psychiatric conditions like ADHD or Alzheimer’s disease. There is no doubt that we have to be careful about the influence of unending data streams of interference on our minds. We need to make more informed decisions about how best to interact with the technologies around learners and how we use the technology positively every day. Perhaps the BRAIN project will guide us on new ways being effective learners.

The lesson seems to be that when we are engaged in something that requires high quality attention (like one of our excellent express courses in critical thinking we should conduct ourselves in a manner that is most appropriate for how our brains function: in the absolute focus mode.
So it seems that despite all the real concerns, technology is not rewiring young people’s brains or brain washing them. Indeed mobile smart technology must and can be harnessed to improve our minds. This will come as a relief to some and a disappointment to others. This new brain research will shed light on our understanding, our attention and focus systems and better memory that can now be applied to a new generation of humans, not so different from the ones who came before.

Mindfeed ebooks by Diane Shawe

Get a copy of Diane Shawe book from Amazon

 

 Shawe’s eBooks are available on Amazon right now at: https://www.amazon.com/Diane-Shawe/e/B0052WG8V6

About the Author

Diane Shawe is an author, speaker, trainer, mentor, consultant and entrepreneur with more than 15 years of experience. She has personally trained over 2800 people around the world in a variety of fields and has published a number of works. She has contributed to over 100 Kiva Entrepreneur’s around the world.

She was also one of the producers of a Day time Ladies Talk Show in 2015 and Host of one of the UK’s best loved Annual Hair Extensions Awards.

Diane also enjoys oil painting, sailing and clay pigeon shooting. She focuses on topics that she is passionate about in her writing and has attracted over 36,000 followers on her popular blog.

Media Contact
Company Name: AVPT Short Courses & Hair Extension Training Academy
Contact Person: Diane Shawe MEd
Email: Send Email
Phone: +44 208 1333120
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Website: http://www.academyexpresscourses.com

Diane Shawe speaks at Business Startup on the 6th & 7th June 2013

business startup show 2013

Welcome to AVPT Global! We will be exhibiting at the Business startup show on the 6th & 7th |June 2013. We will be showing you some of our popular courses, how to turn your mobile device into a learning and teaching tool and how to create a new career doing this.  We get people qualified in days, not years, through our soft skills training courses, which are globally accredited through IAO and are available online or in workshops. All online courses are supported with a personal tutor!

free ticketVisit us on stand 330

business startup show 2013 dIANE sHAWE

Text ‘EARNINGS’ to  0793 798 5077 to get a £100 voucher? Click the Banner!

Diane Shawe M.Ed MIoD IEBE

Hear Diane speak on How to use your mobile phone to learn and earn.

Diane previously spent six years working for the Department of Trade and Industry working with bodies that award funding to business start-ups. In this presentation she will share six ways to raise finance for your company without resorting to banks – important guidance in this period of economic constraint.

About Diane Shawe M.Ed MIoD IEBE

As the CEO of AVPT Global, which provides online fast-track training courses, Ms. Shawe utilises her expertise in education and business administration to oversee individual, one-on-one, group and corporate training. In addition, she ensures that staff members are reporting and achieving and that the business is meeting its target of student recruitment. Ms. Shawe also manages the quality of training, company finances and front-end marketing, while also maintaining the business profile. She has been in the educational field for the last 15 years and has successfully led her company for the past five.

Find out how Diane’s company has created the next best online career!

In addition to handling her day-to-day responsibilities with flair, Ms. Shawe has published several books, including: “How to Cyber Kiss your Business to Success,” and “100 Ways to Generate Quick Emergency Cash.” She believes that people should try to integrate the following practice into their daily lives: “never do anything as though you are a professional amateur.”

Her next publication is due out in June title ‘The digital face of Education’

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