Tag Archives: training

Tips For Women Entrepreneurs on How To Avoid Feeling Isolated As A Small Business

Female entrepreneurs share how to avoid feeling isolated

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (8)
‘Meeting up with mothers who were running small firms or freelancing made me feel connected to the real world again,’ says The Early Hour’s Anne Ridout

Annie Ridout had a one-year-old daughter when she launched her digital magazine for mothers, The Early Hour, in 2015.
“The only time that I could commit to writing and doing admin was during the baby’s nap times and evenings,” she says.

It meant that she had no free time to socialise and spent most days at home, alone.

She was left feeling incredibly lonely and unmotivated, but all that changed when she started to attend some networking events, including Mothers Meeting and The Step Up Club.

“Meeting up with other mothers who were running small firms or freelancing made me feel connected to the real world again,” she says. “I had women to talk to, moan with and get ideas from.”

At first, Ms Ridout found it intimidating, but soon realised that the key to networking is arriving prepared. “Do some research beforehand about the theme or subject – and think about what can you offer around it,” she says.

Don’t forget to ask for contact details, she adds, explaining that it’s not enough to just hand your card out:

“Send an email after the event saying that it was so lovely to meet them and ask to stay in touch – and don’t worry about coming across too keen; people will almost always be pleased to hear from you.”

Find a mentor

For Victoria Usher, founder of GingerMay PR, leaving the buzz of
an office and the comradeship of colleagues was unsettling when she started her own communications firm:

“It was a shock to realise that time-consuming tasks, such as admin and finances, needed to be factored into my schedule.”

Not having people around to discuss problems with was hard, she admits: “I felt lonely at points; I missed having a team.”

To help her through, she found a mentor, Jo Butcher, whom she met while working for Dentsu Aegis.

“We had a weekly Skype call and she would help me with
everything from brainstorming ideas to sense-checking my work,” explains Ms Usher. “It was comforting to know that there was someone at the end of the phone who had gone through the same and had a successful business to show for it.”

When looking for a mentor, try to find someone who has run a business in a similar field, but has grown it much bigger, she advises. It also helps if they have worked in the same role as you, so they truly understand the pressures that you’re facing.

'There were few people whom I could talk to about work,' says Lenka Lutonska
‘There were few people whom I could talk to about work,’ says Lenka Lutonska

Co-work with colleagues

Female business coach, Lenka Lutonska, thinks women in particular feel lonely when starting-up because they crave emotional connections with others – and that can be hard when working alone.

“When I started out, friends did not understand why I would leave a well-paid job, sell my house and sacrifice my lifestyle, only to work on a business with very little income,” she says. “There were few people whom I could talk to about work; my computer was my only companion.”

She decided to “buddy-up” with an old friend who had started their own business in a similar industry.

“We would create co-working days where she would come to my office for a day, or vice versa. We exchanged ideas, honest feedback, kept each other accountable and even partnered on projects,” says Ms Lutonska.

“Working not only became more enjoyable, but we also helped each other to become aware of our blind spots.”

She also started a Facebook group, which was initially made to attract clients but ended up becoming a great networking tool as word spread quickly and more women joined. Community members often ask for help with specific business issues.

“It can feel lonely to build a business on your own, and tough;
there’s always something that you don’t know.

“That’s why support groups are a fantastic source for tips and for socialising – they’re great for creating meaningful relationships with other entrepreneurs.”

Take a breather

A final tip comes from Sarah Cooke, owner of silicone jewellery company, Halia Rose, who suggests yoga classes.

“I do a regular class to get some time out to myself and stave off burnout, and I can chat to people about things totally unrelated to my business and get away from it for a while.”

Visit The Telegraph on Facebook for more fantastic tips

How My Teacher Almost Dashed My Dreams Of Writing

wear your pretty shoes well by diane shawe884346925..jpg

When I was 8 years old I remember my teacher Mr Lester ripping up my homework and accusing me of copying the story I wrote for my homework that week. I remember it was a story about being lost in the woods at night, I use to be afraid of the dark back then.

I cried and said I hadn’t copied it, he gave me detention on top of that and called me a liar.

I was so embarrassed and ashamed I never did well in English Literature again just to spite him I thought but really he had squashed my confidence.

16 books later all published on Amazon with my most recent which took 3 years to write and a healthy vibrant blog with over 35k followers which I have been nurturing since 2010

Do you think adults in position of influence realise what they can do to a child?

Never let negative people define who you are or what you want to become.

Coaching is also important and if you want to propel your vision coaching can help you stay laser focused with a strategic plan

Download your copy on #amazon today https://goo.gl/gm9t2U

Diane Shawe’s eBooks are available on Amazon right now at: https://www.amazon.com/Diane-Shawe/e/B0052WG8V6

Here’s the Main Reasons Adult Education is Broken and I’ll Prove It To You

Is Adult Education Broken?

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (4)

Adult education has become undervalued in an overpriced educational infrastructure.

The people who need the most help are already systematically ripped off by greedy loan companies, NHS parking, having to pay charges for drawing out their own money from private ATM machines in poorer boroughs, pre-paid electric meter’s to name but a few.

The more you seem to need help the more you seem to have to pay.

Off course, the arguments are always about risk, but to compound on top of their needs, a premium, just to make sure the risk is compensated for is questionable indeed. But another kind of ripping off is taking place. ‘Free online education’ you may ask ‘why is this a rip-off people”?
I will answer this from my perspective initially and then make further arguments as to why we should be very concerned about this un-policed, unchallenged butchery of the values originally infused into our adult educational system.

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (2)So if you all but think Adult Education is Broken and all but given up, this book spills the beans on what has gone wrong, what questions need to be addressed and if certain issues are tackled by Government, then there’s Hope,

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:

“No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into
          account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be.”

So the big Question is – What has happened?

  • Why have these large institutions priced education out of some fundamental principles?
  • Why on the other spectrum are all these free courses flooded the market?
  • How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning?
  • How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with or without experience and not just for the youth?

It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (5)
“If unemployment formed a country it would be the 5th largest in the world”

                                                  Isaac Asimov

 
Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area.  Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an every changing economy.

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those
                                     who can best manage change.”                       Darwin

Throughout the ages, every human society has experienced challenges adjusting to population growth, maintaining structural order and creating channels for future generations. How well a society prepares the next generation for survival is imperative for the society as a whole but we have stalled in this process.

There seems to be a range of systemic failures such as

: failure to find a formula to develop teachers convergent and divergent Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (3)facilitating skills
: failure to consider cultural relevance
: failure to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills
: failure to prepare about taking personal responsibility
: failure to provide adequate technology and supporting curriculum
: failure to encourage international engagement
: failure to manage growth of academic misconduct

Diane Shawe Author states that “the traditional belief that we must prepare ourselves to be ‘employable’ is under threat. The counter argument encourages us to ‘gear up’ for earning our own money, rather than seeing income as someone else’s responsibility”

With the population dramatically aging and low-level jobs increasingly swallowed up by machinery, entrepreneurship will be a necessity for many, rather than a lifestyle choice for some.

SMEs are of course already leading this charge but in order to gear up for the future we need to start off by asking a serious question, defining criteria’s and examining trends, impact these trends will have and plan a way to jointly prepare current and future generations to be both employable and entrepreneurial.

We are living in a new economy—powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. And we are entering the new century with an opportunity on our side but huge problems that require new thinking.

claim free course now

Is Adult Education Broken by Diane Shawe Author (12)

Click to find out more about creating your own On Demand Digital Course Library

How to create a digital on demand course library

 

 

£8000 worth of Scholarship to be given to four students in 45minutes.

Image

Maya receiving her certificate at the house of Lords

E-Learning hub, the Academy of Vocational and Professional Training, targets scholars by launching a ‘Dragon’s Den’ style initiative

Launching Friday 12th October 2012 on stand 315 at the Youth Enterprise Live Initiative at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, young people will be encouraged to pitch the reasons they deserve a scholarship to a group of experts, Dragon’s Den style! Potential scholars will be battling it out for the chance to acquire a scholarship worth over £2,000 from The Academy of Vocational and Professional Training (AVPT). Four of the candidates will be chosen on the day, to mark the launch of the Scholarship Den with Channel 4 recording the day’s events.

AVPT supports young adults by offering them affordable and quick globally accredited soft skills qualifications. Diane Shawe, Founder and CEO says: “Our courses range from £250 to £4,500, which can be done either online or at one of our fast track training workshops. However, we respect that some students aren’t in the financial position to pay this money, and that’s why we have created the Scholarship Den.”

AVPT has found that many graduates are struggling to take their first, all important, steps on the career ladder as potential employers worry that graduates do not have enough experience. Tim Dingle, Chief Development Officer, explains how AVPT can help graduates overcome this issue, “Many students and young people are stuck in a catch 22. Employers aren’t willing to take the risk on inexperienced individuals and graduates aren’t able to gain experience. AVPT specialise in courses that are prepared at NVQ level 4. The courses are packaged in a chunk-able format so that blended learning can take place whilst the student is on the move and help young people into work quickly.”

APVT Global launches Scholarship Den

The ‘Chunk-able format’ in which the courses are designed in, allows students to work on the move using their tablet, smartphone or notebook, rather than committing to a 2000-word essay and most courses can even be completed in just one month!

On September 21st 2012, AVPT’s first intake of students received their awards at the House of Lords with certificated globally accredited by the International Accreditation Organisation (IAO). Lord Ahmed congratulated the students and recognised that e-learning has a place in helping all types of people continue in life-long blended learning.

As the m-learning hub continues to grow, AVPT is now working with apprenticeship schemes to provide apprentices with the key skills they require. With this new initiative and the Scholarship Den’s launch, looking forward it is set to be a very busy and successful year!

To find out more information about the Academy of Vocational and Professional Training please visit http://www.avptglobal.com or call 0203 551 2621.

Academy of Vocational and Professional Training presents its students certificates at the House of Lords

Rachel Fanshawe receives her certificate from Baroness Uddin

The Academy of Vocational & Professional Training held it’s first graduation ceremony on Friday 21st September in the Grand Committee room at the House of Lords.  The first intake of 38 was presented their certificates by Baroness Uddin of which six students from Oman was awarded certificates in Leadership Skills, Crisis Management and effective feedback.

All the courses supplied by AVPT are globally accredited by the International Accreditation Organisation (IAO) who granted AVPT full accreditation in June 2012.  Diane Shawe the CEO was delighted and wanted to mark this very special occassion for the first lot of students to benefit from this global accreditation.

Afterwards, Lord Ahmed (founder of the

Lord Ahmed & Diane Shawe CEO

Entrepreneurship Committee in the House of Lords) offered up congratulations and was delighted that technology could inspire and be a constructive vehicle to help vocational training through m-learning.

Diane Shawe founder & Chief Executive Officer launched this global service which offers more than 240 outstanding interactive on-line and express classroom courses, covering a wide variety of subjects. The courses are flexible, scalable and student centered. Diane and her team are committed to supporting the global lifelong learning experience.

The Academy of Vocational and Professional Training is a globally accredited organisation whose courses and certificates are recognised around the world. Tim Dingle Chief Development Office states “In these times of economic and educational uncertainty it makes sense to gain qualifications that can improve life chances, and we believe that our online blended learning methodology uses fully trained virtual tutors will aid super-learning through our latest e-learning management strategies”.

AVPT’s courses work for anyone who wishes to learn rapidly, whether unemployed, redundant, disabled, retired, graduate, single mothers, ex-forces, lawyers or those simply wishing to up-skill or become one of the growing number of online Virtual Tutor Facilitator.

Academy of Vocational & Professional training will be exhibiting at stand 315. They are the key sponsors for the education section and will be delivering 8 seminar and workshops at the Youth Enterprise live on the 12th & 13th October 2012.  Tickets are available online free of charge.

www.expresstrainingcourses.com

Why 2013 is going to be a bumper year to become a Virtual Teacher

Become a Virtual Teacher Facilitator

I originally blogged way back in 2010 that the growth for professional trainers was going to grow.  But I have since spotted a gap in the market which is now becoming a growing trend throughout 2012.

So why is 2012/13  going to be a different type of bumper year for training organisations or consultant who can help the  unemployed individuals upgrade into a new skill that will help them generate their own income?

Well usher in the new breed of Virtual Teachers!  If your not up to speck with the new direction and growth in the market then you could really find yourself on the old fashion self by 2016!  Make no mistake, becoming a trainer is all about running a business.   Being up to date with the latest techniques, developments, trends and needs is just as essential if you decided to set up a coffee shop.

Institutions of higher learning increasingly embrace on-line education, with 65.5 percent of chief academic officers now calling on-line education ‘critical’ to their institutions! long-term strategy, an opinion that’s risen more than 15% over eight years.

Like any business you still have to source new customers, gain glowing appraisals and testimonials, get your pricing right, court the right type of publicity and sustain credibility.  Oh! and let’s not forget making a profit.

We all know it takes a certain kind of self belief and courage to set up any type of business in today’s climate. You could even make a claim based on sheer desperation, the need to do something to generate an income.

But it even takes more courage to leave your destiny in the hands of many of the businesses today, no matter what their global or brand status might be. Most people are now being spurred into self employment due to the levels of redundancies, job insecurities and the need to meet ongoing expenses.

Participants are more interested in the qualifications and or skills they will gain in the subject at hand, and the experience you have in doing jobs similar to theirs and your track record in ‘doing’ rather than ‘talking about’ the topic.

What is really important is your ability to engage with participants around this experience and help them to translate that into action. That is where the true value often lies for them. Of course we know that there are academic trainers and teacher courses which award accredited or private certificates.

Choosing the entrepreneurial route can bring great benefits, but there are also challenges.

What are some of the considerations before you decide to set up, invest or replicate another successful business model?

  1. Be candid about your strength and weaknesses. What do you have to bring to the table?
  2. Do as much homework as you can before taking the plunge
  3. Look carefully into all aspects of owning and running a business and sound out anyone you know who has already done it.
  4. Be prepared to change your idea or abandon outdated school of thoughts.
  5. Don’t be scared to appraise negative feedback, all businesses have a negative and positive aspect to them.
  6. Prepare a business or marketing plan. You’ll save yourself a lot of time, money and stress if you understand as much about the theoretical side of the business as well as the vocational aspects

Ask yourself these key questions before launching your business:

a) Is there a demand, how long will the demand last, is it scalable, can you bolt it onto anything else, can you partner?

b) Have you got the full support of your family? Your decision is likely to impact on them, so talk to them first. Don’t be put off by their own fears, if you can actively offer up reassurances of how you can cope with whatever concerns them, then will be serve to give both them and yourself the confidence to move forward.

c) Speak to any contacts you have in the sector you plan to work in. If you are going to invest in a Franchise, they try to get some feedback from any previous candidates who have made the investment.

d) Check out the competition. If there isn’t any, why not? You may not have rivals but will you have any customers?

e) Are you prepared to work the long hours to get the business off the ground?

f) Do you have the necessary skills? Can you cope with paperwork? Can you cope with criticism?

g) What about funding? Talk to several banks and consider various options, be careful though, they are not assisting many businesses today they are more interested in protecting their own levels of risk and increasing their profits. Some of the smaller banks might be of interest as they might treat you more like a customer than a commodity.

h) Could your training course attract funding on behalf of the student? This might make it simple for them to enter your training services if some of the costs could be supplemented.

i)  Are you clear at delivering information, can you present subject matters or theory step by step, what training would you need to boost your technique, confidence and presentation skills.  Could you get funding for your own training?

Important advice about redundancy money

If you are considering using your redundancy money, make sure you set aside enough for household bills and other costs. It is important that you think of your redundancy money as your cushion until you get yourself back on your feet.

  1. Invest what you feel you can afford to risk or lose but do so where you have some knowledge and a passion for the subject involved.
  2. Try not be over powered by flash organisations offering huge earning potential subject to you parting with lots of your own money.
  3. Don’t rely on the referrals and testimonial they supply to you.  Do some of your own research.
  4. Remember every business has to start small and keep lean before it can grow to a stable long term business
  5. Don’t rely on marketing short-cuts, this can be very expensive and  not very productive.

More and more people are looking for good quality training courses that can add value to their life, career portfolio and career longevity.

It has been proven that most recessions bring an influx of new businesses, entrepreneurs and even millionaires. One of these new areas of business is the growth of the non surgical hair replacement and hair enhancement sector.

The UK and Europe has a shortage of properly trained trainers who can deliver a variety of hair extension and hair enhancement technique to the non professional and professionally qualified sector.

An opportunity now exists for anyone wanting to enter the vocational training market with a service that has far reaching benefit and impressive revenue streams.

An opportunity exists throughout the UK today to establish your own virtual training school in this very selective and much needed service. Visit our website to read a little more about how you can make the first steps to becoming a Virtual Trainer